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Faxen-Irving, G., Falahati, F., Basun, H., Eriksdotter, M., Vedin, I., Wahlund, L.-O., . . . Freund-Levi, Y. (2018). Does Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Differ between Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Cohabiting Proxies?. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 61(2), 515-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Differ between Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Cohabiting Proxies?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 515-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low tissue levels of the major marine ω3 fatty acids (FAs) DHA and EPA are found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated if healthy proxies to AD patients have higher levels of these ω3 FAs. We observed lower levels of EPA and DHA in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from 64 AD patients compared with 16 cognitively healthy proxies. No significant difference was observed when pairwise comparisons were made between a subset of 16 AD patients and their co-habiting proxies. Larger studies are needed to replicate these findings and to determine if they could depend on FA intake or differences in metabolism.

Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, cognition, cohabitants, DHA, EPA, omega 3 fatty acids, subcutaneous adipose tissue
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343881 (URN)10.3233/JAD-170359 (DOI)000422844100004 ()29154271 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilStiftelsen Gamla TjänarinnorSwedish Society of MedicineThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the Demented
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Gomes, F., Schuetz, P., Bounoure, L., Austin, P., Ballesteros-Pomar, M., Cederholm, T., . . . Bischoff, S. C. (2018). ESPEN guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid internal medicine patients. Clinical Nutrition, 37(1), 336-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ESPEN guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid internal medicine patients
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 336-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background & aims: Polymorbidity (also known as multimorbidity)-defined as the co-occurrence of at least two chronic health conditions - is highly prevalent, particularly in the hospitalized population. Nonetheless, clinical guidelines largely address individual diseases and rarely account for polymorbidity. The aim of this project was to develop guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid patients hospitalized in medical wards.

Methods: The methodology used for the development of the current project follows the standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines. It started with an initial meeting of the Working Group in January 2015, where twelve key clinical questions were developed that encompassed different aspects of nutritional support: indication, route of feeding, energy and protein requirements, micronutrient requirements, disease-specific nutrients, timing, monitoring and procedure of intervention. Systematic literature searches were conducted in three different databases (Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library), as well as in secondary sources (e.g. published guidelines), until April 2016. Retrieved abstracts were screened to identify relevant studies that were used to develop recommendations, which were followed by submission to Delphi voting rounds.

Results: From a total of 4532 retrieved abstracts, 38 relevant studies were analyzed and used to generate a guideline draft that proposed 22 recommendations and four statements. The results of the first online voting showed a strong consensus (agreement of >90%) in 68% of recommendations and 75% of statements, and consensus (agreement of >75-90%) in 32% of recommendations and 25% of statements. At the final consensus conference, a consensus greater than 89% was reached for all of the recommendations.

Conclusions: Despite the methodological difficulties in creating non-disease specific guidelines, the evidence behind several important aspects of nutritional support for polymorbid medical inpatients was reviewed and summarized into practical clinical recommendations. Use of these guidelines offer an evidence-based nutritional approach to the polymorbid medical inpatient and may improve their outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2018
Keywords
Guidelines, Polymorbidity, Multimorbidity, Nutritional support, Hospitalized patients
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349831 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.06.025 (DOI)000425564200044 ()28802519 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
von Berens, Å., Koochek, A., Nydahl, M., Fielding, R. A., Gustafsson, T., Kirn, D. R., . . . Södergren, M. (2018). "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe”. Experiences from a health-promoting intervention in community dwelling older adults — A qualitative study. Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, 22(4), 541-548
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe”. Experiences from a health-promoting intervention in community dwelling older adults — A qualitative study
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 541-548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Studies show that regular exercise in combination with nutritional support can be effective in managing sarcopenia, which is age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Qualitative investigations of participants' experiences from interventions in this domain are scarce. In this study, we explored older persons' experiences from an intervention designed to prevent sarcopenia, with the aim of capturing the participants' thoughts and opinions.

Design: A qualitative study embedded in the multicenter randomized clinical trial The Vitality and Vigor in the Elderly study, VIVE2. Focus group interviews were conducted. Manifest and latent content analyses were performed.

Participants: Community dwelling older adults (n=20) 71-86 years of age with minor limitations in mobility.

Results: The experiences from the intervention were categorized and interpreted in one overall theme "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe". The theme encompasses the categories psychological effects of participating in the intervention, physical effects of participating in the intervention, the importance of social support and the importance of a tailored set-up. The participants described their motives for participating in the intervention as being based on concerns regarding the negative health effects of continuing a sedentary lifestyle, difficulties of getting started on their own and lack of confidence in accomplishing change on their own. Participants also expressed that one main objective for participating was to lose weight.

Conclusion: In this study we have captured the experiences of older adults with minor mobility limitations who participated in a lifestyle intervention. The experiences are interpreted in one overall theme "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe". The central understanding of the participants' experiences was that the intervention affected them in several ways, both psychologically and physically, and that supporting factors included the social support, which became a prerequisite for success. A noticeable finding was the discrepancy between the motive of the participants, to lose weight, and the aim of the study, to improve muscle function. The expectation to lose weight seems to reflect what is commonly known as to be healthy. To our knowledge, at least in Sweden, there are no campaigns or public information highlighting the risks of sarcopenia and the complex issue of if, and when weight loss is desirable for older individuals. This finding highlights the importance of providing such information to this target group. The findings in this study provide valuable knowledge for research teams, practitioners and decision makers when designing and setting objectives for health-promoting interventions for older individuals.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342680 (URN)10.1007/s12603-017-0981-5 (DOI)000428385500013 ()29582895 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Jensen, G. L. & Cederholm, T. (2018). Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition: Progress Report From ASPEN Clinical Nutrition Week 2017. JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 42(2), 266-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition: Progress Report From ASPEN Clinical Nutrition Week 2017
2018 (English)In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 266-267Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Keywords
malnutrition, screening, assessment, diagnosis
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351599 (URN)10.1177/0148607117707761 (DOI)000425094500001 ()28453391 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Englund, D. A., Kirn, D. R., Koochek, A., Zhu, H., Travison, T. G., Reid, K. F., . . . Fielding, R. A. (2018). Nutritional Supplementation With Physical Activity Improves Muscle Composition in Mobility-Limited Older Adults, The VIVE2 Study: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 73(1), 95-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutritional Supplementation With Physical Activity Improves Muscle Composition in Mobility-Limited Older Adults, The VIVE2 Study: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
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2018 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nutritional supplementation and physical activity have been shown to positively influence muscle mass and strength in older adults. The efficacy of long-term nutritional supplementation in combination with physical activity in older adults remains unclear.

Methods: Mobility-limited (short physical performance battery [SPPB] ≤9) and vitamin D insufficient (serum 25(OH) D 9–24 ng/mL) older adults were recruited for this study. All subjects participated in a physical activity program. Subjects were randomized to consume a daily nutritional supplement (150 kcal, 20 g whey protein, 800 IU vitamin D, 119 mL beverage) or placebo (30 kcal, nonnutritive, 119 mL). In a prespecified secondary analysis, we examined total-body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), thigh composition (computed tomography), and muscle strength, power, and quality before and after the 6-month intervention.

Results: One hundred and forty-nine subjects were randomized into the study [mean (standard deviation, SD) age 78.5 (5.4) years; 46.3% female; mean (SD) short physical performance battery 7.9 (1.2); mean (SD) vitamin D 18.7 (6.4) ng/mL]. After the intervention period both groups demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, body composition, and thigh composition. Nutritional supplementation lead to further losses of intermuscular fat (p = .049) and increased normal muscle density (p = .018).

Conclusions: Six months of physical activity resulted in improvements in body composition, subcutaneous fat, intermuscular fat, and strength measures. The addition of nutritional supplementation resulted in further declines in intermuscular fat and improved muscle density compared to placebo. These results suggest nutritional supplementation provides additional benefits to mobility-limited older adults undergoing exercise training.

Keywords
Exercise, Elderly, Protein, Vitamin D, Sarcopenia
National Category
Geriatrics Nutrition and Dietetics Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348793 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glx141 (DOI)000425534800014 ()28977347 (PubMedID)
Note

Special Issue: SI

Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-04-24Bibliographically approved
von Berens, Å., Cederholm, T., Fielding, R. A., Gustafsson, T., Kirn, D., Laussen, J., . . . Koochek, A. (2018). Physical performance and serum 25(OH)vitamin D status in community dwelling old mobility limited adults: A cross-sectional study. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 22(1), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical performance and serum 25(OH)vitamin D status in community dwelling old mobility limited adults: A cross-sectional study
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2018 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives:

To examine the potential association between serum 25(OH) vitamin D and theperformance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) including the sub-components; five repeatedchair stands test, 4 meters walk test and balance in older mobility-limited community-dwelling men and women.

Design:

A cross sectional study was performed in American and Swedish subjects who were examined forpotential participation in a combined exercise and nutrition intervention trial. Logistic regression analysis andlinear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association for 25(OH)D with the overall score onthe SBBP, chair stand, gait speed and balance.

Participants:

Community-dwelling (mean age 77.6 ± 5.3 years)mobility limited American (n=494) and Swedish (n=116) females (59%) and males.

Measurements:

The SPPB(0-12 points) includes chair stand (s), gait speed (m/s) and a balance test. Mobility limitation i.e., SPPB score ≤9 was an inclusion criterion. A blood sample was obtained to measure serum 25(OH)vitamin D concentrations.

Results:

No clear association of 25(OH)D with SPPB scores was detected either when 25(OH)D was assessedas a continuous variable or when categorized according to serum concentrations of <50, 50-75 or <75 nmol/L.However, when analyzing the relationship between 25(OH)D and seconds to perform the chair stands, asignificant quadratic relationship was observed. Thus, at serum levels of 25(OH)D above 74 nmol/L, higherconcentrations appeared to be advantageous for the chair stand test, whereas for serum levels below 74 nmol/Lthis association was not observed.

Conclusion:

This cross- sectional study lacked clear association betweenserum 25(OH)D and physical performance in mobility limited adults. A potentially interesting observation wasthat at higher serum levels of 25(OH)D a better performance on the chair stand test was indicated.

Keywords
older adults, physical function, serum 25(OH)D, community- dwelling, SPPB
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317333 (URN)10.1007/s12603-016-0849-0 (DOI)000426898700001 ()
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
Miguel, S., Champ, C., Day, J., Aarts, E., Bahr, B. A., Bakker, M., . . . Geurts, L. (2018). Poor cognitive ageing: Vulnerabilities, mechanisms and the impact of nutritional interventions. Ageing Research Reviews, 42, 40-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poor cognitive ageing: Vulnerabilities, mechanisms and the impact of nutritional interventions
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2018 (English)In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 42, p. 40-55Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Ageing is a highly complex process marked by a temporal cascade of events, which promote alterations in the normal functioning of an individual organism. The triggers of normal brain ageing are not well understood, even less so the factors which initiate and steer the neuronal degeneration, which underpin disorders such as dementia. A wealth of data on how nutrients and diets may support cognitive function and preserve brain health are available, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological action in both normal ageing, age-related cognitive decline, and in the development of neurodegenerative disorders have not been clearly elucidated.

Objectives: This review aims to summarise the current state of knowledge of vulnerabilities that predispose towards dysfunctional brain ageing, highlight potential protective mechanisms, and discuss dietary interventions that may be used as therapies. A special focus of this paper is on the impact of nutrition on neuroprotection and the underlying molecular mechanisms, and this focus reflects the discussions held during the 2nd workshop ‘Nutrition for the Ageing Brain: Functional Aspects and Mechanisms’ in Copenhagen in June 2016. The present review is the most recent in a series produced by the Nutrition and Mental Performance Task Force under the auspice of the International Life Sciences Institute Europe (ILSI Europe).

Conclusion: Coupling studies of cognitive ageing with studies investigating the effect of nutrition and dietary interventions as strategies targeting specific mechanisms, such as neurogenesis, protein clearance, inflammation, and non-coding and microRNAs is of high value. Future research on the impact of nutrition on cognitive ageing will need to adopt a longitudinal approach and multimodal nutritional interventions will likely need to be imposed in early-life to observe significant impact in older age.

Keywords
Cognition, Preventive diet, Cognitive decline, Neuroprotection, Neuro-inflammation, Plant-food bioactives
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355830 (URN)10.1016/j.arr.2017.12.004 (DOI)000427343100004 ()29248758 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Verlaan, S., Maier, A. B., Bauer, J. M., Bautmans, I., Brandt, K., Donini, L. M., . . . Cederholm, T. (2018). Sufficient levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and protein intake required to increase muscle mass in sarcopenic older adults - The PROVIDE study. Clinical Nutrition, 37(2), 551-557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sufficient levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and protein intake required to increase muscle mass in sarcopenic older adults - The PROVIDE study
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 551-557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Inadequate nutritional intake and altered response of aging muscles to anabolic stimuli from nutrients contribute to the development of sarcopenia. Nutritional interventions show inconsistent results in sarcopenic older adults, which might be influenced by their basal nutritional status. Objective: To test if baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and dietary protein intake influenced changes in muscle mass and function in older adults who received nutritional intervention. Methods and design: Post-hoc analysis was performed in the PROVIDE study that was a randomized controlled, double blind trial among 380 sarcopenic older adults. This study showed that those who received a vitamin D and leucine-enriched whey protein medical nutrition drink for 13 weeks gained more appendicular muscle mass (aMM), and improved lower-extremity function as assessed by the chair stand test compared with controls. To define low and high groups, a baseline serum concentration of 50 nmol/L 25(OH)D and baseline dietary protein intake of 1.0 g/kg/d were used as cut offs. Results: At baseline, participants with lower 25(OH)D concentrations showed lower muscle mass, strength and function compared with participants with a high 25(OH)D, while the group with lower protein intake (g/kg/day) had more muscle mass at baseline compared with the participants with higher protein intake. Participants with higher baseline 25(OH)D concentrations and dietary protein intake had, independent of other determinants, greater gain in appendicular muscle mass, skeletal muscle index (aMM/h(2)), and relative appendicular muscle mass (aMM/body weight x 100%) in response to the nutritional intervention. There was no effect modification of baseline 25(OH)D status or protein intake on change in chair-stand test. Conclusions: Sufficient baseline levels of 25(OH)D and protein intake may be required to increase muscle mass as a result of intervention with a vitamin D and protein supplement in sarcopenic older adults. This suggests that current cut-offs in the recommendations for vitamin D and protein intake could be considered the "minimum" for adults with sarcopenia to respond adequately to nutrition strategies aimed at attenuating muscle loss. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Oral nutritional supplement, Sarcopenia, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Protein intake, Muscle mass
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351696 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.01.005 (DOI)000428483200016 ()28132725 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Olsson, E., Becker, W., Karlström, B., Cederholm, T. & Sjögren, P. (2017). Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men. Experimental Gerontology, 92, 52-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men
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2017 (English)In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 92, p. 52-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The accuracy of predictive equations for calculating resting energy expenditure (REE) in elderly people has been questioned. Aging is associated with progressive declines in REE, which partly is explained by loss of fat free mass (FFM). Against this background we aimed to identify the most accurate predictive equation for REE in octogenarian men, taking body composition into account and using indirect calorimetry as reference value. REE was measured in 22 men (mean age 82.6 +/- 0.3 years) and compared with six predictive equations: two based on FFM and four based on body weight, height and/or age. FFM was derived from Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analyses. Spearman's rank correlations showed a moderate to high positive monotonic correlation (r = 0.62 to 0.79) between measured and calculated REE (all p < 0.005).The mean calculated REE was significantly different from measured REE for all equations except Mifflin-St Jeor. A calculated REE within 10% of measured REE was considered acceptable and the equations of Mifflin-St Jeor, WHO and Harris-Benedict captured 64%, 50% and 45% of the participant, respectively. The Mifflin-St Jeor equation had the lowest root mean square error (138 kcal), followed by the equation by Harris-Benedict (189 kcal) and WHO (220 kcal). The equations from Luhrmann, Henry and Cunningham predicted REE rather poorly in our study subjects, with e.g. <40% of the individuals within 10% of measured REE. Our results indicate that the Mifflin-St Jeor equation (using FFM) is the most accurate equation estimating REE in these octogenarian men. Harris-Benedict or WHO equations are potential alternatives if information on FFM is unavailable, although their accuracy on an individual level is limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323020 (URN)10.1016/j.exger.2017.03.013 (DOI)000400530400009 ()28323025 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2010-70X-2141401-3, 2011-2427
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Barazzoni, R., Deutz, N. E., Biolo, G., Bischoff, S., Boirie, Y., Cederholm, T., . . . Calder, P. C. (2017). Carbohydrates and insulin resistance in clinical nutrition: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert group.. Clinical Nutrition, 36(2), 355-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbohydrates and insulin resistance in clinical nutrition: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert group.
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 355-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Growing evidence underscores the important role of glycemic control in health and recovery from illness. Carbohydrate ingestion in the diet or administration in nutritional support is mandatory, but carbohydrate intake can adversely affect major body organs and tissues if resulting plasma glucose becomes too high, too low, or highly variable. Plasma glucose control is especially important for patients with conditions such as diabetes or metabolic stress resulting from critical illness or surgery. These patients are particularly in need of glycemic management to help lessen glycemic variability and its negative health consequences when nutritional support is administered. Here we report on recent findings and emerging trends in the field based on an ESPEN workshop held in Venice, Italy, 8-9 November 2015. Evidence was discussed on pathophysiology, clinical impact, and nutritional recommendations for carbohydrate utilization and management in nutritional support. The main conclusions were: a) excess glucose and fructose availability may exacerbate metabolic complications in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and can result in negative clinical impact; b) low-glycemic index and high-fiber diets, including specialty products for nutritional support, may provide metabolic and clinical benefits in individuals with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes; c) in acute conditions such as surgery and critical illness, insulin resistance and elevated circulating glucose levels have a negative impact on patient outcomes and should be prevented through nutritional and/or pharmacological intervention. In such acute settings, efforts should be implemented towards defining optimal plasma glucose targets, avoiding excessive plasma glucose variability, and optimizing glucose control relative to nutritional support.

Keywords
Carbohydrates, Clinical nutrition, Insulin resistance
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317128 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2016.09.010 (DOI)000399624700003 ()27686693 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3705-0725

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