uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 199) Show all publications
Jensen, G. L., Cederholm, T., Correia, M. I., Gonzalez, M. C., Fukushima, R., Higashiguchi, T., . . . Van Gossum, A. (2019). GLIM Criteria for the Diagnosis of Malnutrition: A Consensus Report From the Global Clinical Nutrition Community. JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 43(1), 32-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GLIM Criteria for the Diagnosis of Malnutrition: A Consensus Report From the Global Clinical Nutrition Community
Show others...
2019 (English)In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This initiative aims to build a global consensus around core diagnostic criteria for malnutrition in adults in clinical settings.

Methods: The Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) was convened by several of the major global clinical nutrition societies. Empirical consensus was reached through a series of face‐to‐face meetings, telephone conferences, and e‐mail communications.

Results: A 2‐step approach for the malnutrition diagnosis was selected, that is, first screening to identify at risk status by the use of any validated screening tool, and second, assessment for diagnosis and grading the severity of malnutrition. The malnutrition criteria for consideration were retrieved from existing approaches for screening and assessment. Potential criteria were subjected to a ballot among GLIM participants that selected 3 phenotypic criteria (non‐volitional weight loss, low body mass index, and reduced muscle mass) and 2 etiologic criteria (reduced food intake or assimilation, and inflammation or disease burden). To diagnose malnutrition at least 1 phenotypic criterion and 1 etiologic criterion should be present. Phenotypic metrics for grading severity are proposed. It is recommended that the etiologic criteria be used to guide intervention and anticipated outcomes. The recommended approach supports classification of malnutrition into four etiology‐related diagnosis categories.

Conclusions: A consensus scheme for diagnosing malnutrition in adults in clinical settings on a global scale is proposed. Next steps are to secure endorsements from leading nutrition professional societies, to identify overlaps with syndromes like cachexia and sarcopenia, and to promote dissemination, validation studies, and feedback. The construct should be re‐considered every 3–5 years.

Keywords
assessment, diagnosis, malnutrition, screening
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375844 (URN)10.1002/jpen.1440 (DOI)000455817700006 ()30175461 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Grönstedt, H., Vikström, S., Cederholm, T., Franzen, E., Seiger, Å., Wimo, A., . . . Boström, A.-M. (2018). A study protocol of Older Person's Exercise and Nutrition Study (OPEN) - a sit-to-stand activity combined with oral protein supplement - effects on physical function and independence: a cluster randomized clinical trial. BMC Geriatrics, 18, Article ID 138.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study protocol of Older Person's Exercise and Nutrition Study (OPEN) - a sit-to-stand activity combined with oral protein supplement - effects on physical function and independence: a cluster randomized clinical trial
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Poor nutrition and age per see add to the development of sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and strength, which contributes to increased risk of impaired activities of daily living (ADL) and reduced independence. Protein deficiency plays an important role in the development of sarcopenia. In order to increase the muscle mass protein intake should be combined with physical exercise. A daily physical activity, the sit-to-stand exercise, has been proven to decrease older persons' dependence in ADL. Our study aims to evaluate the effects of the sit-to-stand exercise in combination with a protein-rich nutritional supplement, on physical function and independence in frail nursing home residents. The resident's perceptions and experiences of the intervention and the staff's experiences of supporting the resident to complete the intervention will also be explored.

Methods: The study is a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial which will be performed in nursing homes at two municipalities in Sweden. We will recruit 120 residents, age 75 or older and able to stand up from a seated position. Residents (n = 60) randomized to the intervention group will perform the sit-to-stand exercise at four occasions daily and will be offered a protein-rich oral supplement, twice a day. The intervention period will last for 12 weeks and measures of physical function, nutritional status, quality of life and health economy will be performed at baseline and at 12-weeks follow-up. The primary outcome will be the number of chair rises performed in 30 s. The control group will receive standard care. Data will be analysed by intention-to-treat analysis and with mixed effect models. During the last part of the intervention period individual interviews with the residents, on the topic of feasibility with the OPEN concept will be held. Likewise, focus-group-interviews with staff will be performed.

Discussion: The residents' physical and mental health could be expected to improve. Even the work situation for staff could be positively affected. One innovative feature of the OPEN study is the simple intervention consisting of a basic daily activity that can be performed by several nursing home residents with the support of existing staff and available resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2018
Keywords
Interview, Mobility, Nursing home, Nursing staff, Nutrition, Older person, Oral nutritional supplement, Physical function, Quality of life, Sit-to-stand
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358526 (URN)10.1186/s12877-018-0824-1 (DOI)000435392100003 ()29898671 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stiftelsen Gamla Tjänarinnor
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Laguzzi, F., Risérus, U., Marklund, M., Vikström, M., Sjögren, P., Gigante, B., . . . Leander, K. (2018). Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women. Clinical Nutrition, 37(6, Part A), 2001-2010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 6, Part A, p. 2001-2010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background & aims: Alcohol consumption is considered to affect circulating fatty acids (FAs) but knowledge about specific associations is limited. We aimed to assess the relation between alcohol consumption and serum FAs in 60-year-old Swedish men and women.

Methods: In a random sample of 1917 men and 2058 women residing in Stockholm county, cross-sectional associations between different categories of alcohol consumption and FAs were assessed using linear regression; beta(1) coefficients with 95% confidence interval (Cl) were calculated. Self-reported alcohol consumption was categorized as none, low (<= 9.9 g/day) (reference), moderate (10-29.9 g/day) and high (>= 30 g/day). Moderate alcohol consumption was further subdivided into consumption of beer, wine, liquor and their combinations. Thirteen serum cholesterol ester FM were measured by gas chromatography and individual FM were expressed as percentage of total FAs.

Results: Increasing alcohol consumption was associated to linear increase of saturated myristic acid, monounsaturated FAs and n-6 polyunsaturated (PUFA) arachidonic acid, whereas linear decrease was noted for saturated pentadecanoic acid and for n-6 PUFA linoleic acid. With non-linear associations, increasing alcohol consumption also associated to decreased saturated stearic acid, n-6 PUFA dihomogamma-linolenic acid, and n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid and increased saturated palmitic acid, n-6 PUFA gamma-linolenic acid and n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid. Among types of beverages, wine consumption was associated with n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (beta(1) 0.59; 95% CI: 030;0.88) and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30;0.78), and docosahexaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.06; 95% CI: 0.00;0.12).

Conclusions: These findings may give important basis for further investigations to better understand biological mechanisms behind the dose-dependent associations between alcohol consumption and health outcomes observed in many previous studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2018
Keywords
Ethanol, Alcohol drinking, Alcoholic beverages, Wine, Beer, Fatty acids
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375579 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.09.007 (DOI)000455069400023 ()29032841 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 52120133894Swedish Research Council, 09533Stockholm County Council, 20150163Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150581
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Faxen-Irving, G., Falahati, F., Basun, H., Eriksdotter, M., Vedin, I., Wahlund, L.-O., . . . Freund-Levi, Y. (2018). Does Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Differ between Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Cohabiting Proxies?. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 61(2), 515-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Differ between Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Cohabiting Proxies?
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 515-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low tissue levels of the major marine ω3 fatty acids (FAs) DHA and EPA are found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated if healthy proxies to AD patients have higher levels of these ω3 FAs. We observed lower levels of EPA and DHA in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from 64 AD patients compared with 16 cognitively healthy proxies. No significant difference was observed when pairwise comparisons were made between a subset of 16 AD patients and their co-habiting proxies. Larger studies are needed to replicate these findings and to determine if they could depend on FA intake or differences in metabolism.

Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, cognition, cohabitants, DHA, EPA, omega 3 fatty acids, subcutaneous adipose tissue
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343881 (URN)10.3233/JAD-170359 (DOI)000422844100004 ()29154271 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilStiftelsen Gamla TjänarinnorSwedish Society of MedicineThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the Demented
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
von Berens, Å., Fielding, R. A., Gustafsson, T., Kirn, D., Laussen, J., Nydahl, M., . . . Koochek, A. (2018). Effect of exercise and nutritional supplementation on health-related quality of life and mood in older adults: the VIVE2 randomized controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 18, Article ID 286.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of exercise and nutritional supplementation on health-related quality of life and mood in older adults: the VIVE2 randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, article id 286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and absence of depressive symptoms are of great importance for older people, which may be achieved through lifestyle interventions, e.g., exercise and nutrition interventions. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effects of a physical activity program in combination with protein supplementation on HRQoL and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling, mobility-limited older adults. Methods: In the Vitality, Independence, and Vigor 2 Study (VIVE2), community-dwelling men and women with an average age of 77.55.4 years, some mobility limitations and low serum vitamin D levels (25(OH)Vit D 22.5-60 nmol/l) from two study sites (Stockholm, Sweden and Boston, USA) were randomized to receive a nutritional supplement or a placebo for 6 months. All took part in a physical activity program 2-3 times/week. The primary outcome examined in VIVE2 was 400 M walk capacity. HRQoL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF36), consisting of the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS), and depressive symptoms were measured using The Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). In the sensitivity analyses, the sample was divided into sub-groups based on body measures and function (body mass index (BMI), appendicular lean mass index (ALMI), handgrip strength and gait speed). Results: For the whole sample, there was a significant improvement in both MCS, mean (95% CI) 2.68 (0.5, 4.9) (p 0.02), and CES-D -2.7 (-4.5, -0.9) (p 0.003) during the intervention, but no difference was detected between those who received the nutritional supplement and those who received the placebo. The results revealed no significant change in PCS or variation in effects across the sub-categories. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a six-month intervention using a physical activity program had positive effects on mental status. No additional effects from nutritional supplementation were detected.

Keywords
Physical activity, Nutritional supplementation, Health-related quality of life, Depressive symptoms
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371048 (URN)10.1186/s12877-018-0976-z (DOI)000450883300001 ()30463527 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Gomes, F., Schuetz, P., Bounoure, L., Austin, P., Ballesteros-Pomar, M., Cederholm, T., . . . Bischoff, S. C. (2018). ESPEN guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid internal medicine patients. Clinical Nutrition, 37(1), 336-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ESPEN guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid internal medicine patients
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 336-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background & aims: Polymorbidity (also known as multimorbidity)-defined as the co-occurrence of at least two chronic health conditions - is highly prevalent, particularly in the hospitalized population. Nonetheless, clinical guidelines largely address individual diseases and rarely account for polymorbidity. The aim of this project was to develop guidelines on nutritional support for polymorbid patients hospitalized in medical wards.

Methods: The methodology used for the development of the current project follows the standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines. It started with an initial meeting of the Working Group in January 2015, where twelve key clinical questions were developed that encompassed different aspects of nutritional support: indication, route of feeding, energy and protein requirements, micronutrient requirements, disease-specific nutrients, timing, monitoring and procedure of intervention. Systematic literature searches were conducted in three different databases (Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library), as well as in secondary sources (e.g. published guidelines), until April 2016. Retrieved abstracts were screened to identify relevant studies that were used to develop recommendations, which were followed by submission to Delphi voting rounds.

Results: From a total of 4532 retrieved abstracts, 38 relevant studies were analyzed and used to generate a guideline draft that proposed 22 recommendations and four statements. The results of the first online voting showed a strong consensus (agreement of >90%) in 68% of recommendations and 75% of statements, and consensus (agreement of >75-90%) in 32% of recommendations and 25% of statements. At the final consensus conference, a consensus greater than 89% was reached for all of the recommendations.

Conclusions: Despite the methodological difficulties in creating non-disease specific guidelines, the evidence behind several important aspects of nutritional support for polymorbid medical inpatients was reviewed and summarized into practical clinical recommendations. Use of these guidelines offer an evidence-based nutritional approach to the polymorbid medical inpatient and may improve their outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2018
Keywords
Guidelines, Polymorbidity, Multimorbidity, Nutritional support, Hospitalized patients
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349831 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.06.025 (DOI)000425564200044 ()28802519 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
von Berens, Å., Koochek, A., Nydahl, M., Fielding, R. A., Gustafsson, T., Kirn, D. R., . . . Södergren, M. (2018). "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe”. Experiences from a health-promoting intervention in community dwelling older adults — A qualitative study. Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, 22(4), 541-548
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe”. Experiences from a health-promoting intervention in community dwelling older adults — A qualitative study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 541-548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Studies show that regular exercise in combination with nutritional support can be effective in managing sarcopenia, which is age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Qualitative investigations of participants' experiences from interventions in this domain are scarce. In this study, we explored older persons' experiences from an intervention designed to prevent sarcopenia, with the aim of capturing the participants' thoughts and opinions.

Design: A qualitative study embedded in the multicenter randomized clinical trial The Vitality and Vigor in the Elderly study, VIVE2. Focus group interviews were conducted. Manifest and latent content analyses were performed.

Participants: Community dwelling older adults (n=20) 71-86 years of age with minor limitations in mobility.

Results: The experiences from the intervention were categorized and interpreted in one overall theme "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe". The theme encompasses the categories psychological effects of participating in the intervention, physical effects of participating in the intervention, the importance of social support and the importance of a tailored set-up. The participants described their motives for participating in the intervention as being based on concerns regarding the negative health effects of continuing a sedentary lifestyle, difficulties of getting started on their own and lack of confidence in accomplishing change on their own. Participants also expressed that one main objective for participating was to lose weight.

Conclusion: In this study we have captured the experiences of older adults with minor mobility limitations who participated in a lifestyle intervention. The experiences are interpreted in one overall theme "Feeling more self-confident, cheerful and safe". The central understanding of the participants' experiences was that the intervention affected them in several ways, both psychologically and physically, and that supporting factors included the social support, which became a prerequisite for success. A noticeable finding was the discrepancy between the motive of the participants, to lose weight, and the aim of the study, to improve muscle function. The expectation to lose weight seems to reflect what is commonly known as to be healthy. To our knowledge, at least in Sweden, there are no campaigns or public information highlighting the risks of sarcopenia and the complex issue of if, and when weight loss is desirable for older individuals. This finding highlights the importance of providing such information to this target group. The findings in this study provide valuable knowledge for research teams, practitioners and decision makers when designing and setting objectives for health-promoting interventions for older individuals.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342680 (URN)10.1007/s12603-017-0981-5 (DOI)000428385500013 ()29582895 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Jensen, G. L. & Cederholm, T. (2018). Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition: Progress Report From ASPEN Clinical Nutrition Week 2017. JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 42(2), 266-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition: Progress Report From ASPEN Clinical Nutrition Week 2017
2018 (English)In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 266-267Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Keywords
malnutrition, screening, assessment, diagnosis
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351599 (URN)10.1177/0148607117707761 (DOI)000425094500001 ()28453391 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Vellas, B., Fielding, R. A., Bens, C., Bernabei, R., Cawthon, P. M., Cederholm, T., . . . Cesari, M. (2018). IMPLICATIONS OF ICD-10 FOR SARCOPENIA CLINICAL PRACTICE AND CLINICAL TRIALS: REPORT BY THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH TASK FORCE. JOURNAL OF FRAILTY & AGING, 7(1), 2-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IMPLICATIONS OF ICD-10 FOR SARCOPENIA CLINICAL PRACTICE AND CLINICAL TRIALS: REPORT BY THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH TASK FORCE
Show others...
2018 (English)In: JOURNAL OF FRAILTY & AGING, ISSN 2260-1341, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 2-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Establishment of an ICD-10-CM code for sarcopenia in 2016 was an important step towards reaching international consensus on the need for a nosological framework of age-related skeletal muscle decline. The International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force met in April 2017 to discuss the meaning, significance, and barriers to the implementation of the new code as well as strategies to accelerate development of new therapies. Analyses by the Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium are underway to develop quantitative definitions of sarcopenia. A consensus conference is planned to evaluate this analysis. The Task Force also discussed lessons learned from sarcopenia trials that could be applied to future trials, as well as lessons from the osteoporosis field, a clinical condition with many constructs similar to sarcopenia and for which ad hoc treatments have been developed and approved by regulatory agencies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EDITIONS SERDI, 2018
Keywords
Sarcopenia, frailty, obesity, disability, intervention studies, prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368780 (URN)10.14283/jfa.2017.30 (DOI)000446932800001 ()29412436 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Dent, E., Morley, J. E., Cruz-Jentoft, A. J., Arai, H., Kritchevsky, S. B., Guralnik, J., . . . Vellas, B. (2018). International Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sarcopenia (ICFSR): Screening, Diagnosis and Management. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 22(10), 1148-1161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sarcopenia (ICFSR): Screening, Diagnosis and Management
Show others...
2018 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1148-1161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Sarcopenia, defined as an age-associated loss of skeletal muscle function and muscle mass, occurs in approximately 6 - 22 % of older adults. This paper presents evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for screening, diagnosis and management of sarcopenia from the task force of the International Conference on Sarcopenia and Frailty Research (ICSFR).

Methods: To develop the guidelines, we drew upon the best available evidence from two systematic reviews paired with consensus statements by international working groups on sarcopenia. Eight topics were selected for the recommendations: (i) defining sarcopenia; (ii) screening and diagnosis; (iii) physical activity prescription; (iv) protein supplementation; (v) vitamin D supplementation; (vi) anabolic hormone prescription; (vii) medications under development; and (viii) research. The ICSFR task force evaluated the evidence behind each topic including the quality of evidence, the benefit harm balance of treatment, patient preferences/values, and cost-effectiveness. Recommendations were graded as either strong or conditional (weak) as per the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Consensus was achieved via one face-to-face workshop and a modified Delphi process.

Recommendations: We make a conditional recommendation for the use of an internationally accepted measurement tool for the diagnosis of sarcopenia including the EWGSOP and FNIH definitions, and advocate for rapid screening using gait speed or the SARC-F. To treat sarcopenia, we strongly recommend the prescription of resistance-based physical activity, and conditionally recommend protein supplementation/a protein-rich diet. No recommendation is given for Vitamin D supplementation or for anabolic hormone prescription. There is a lack of robust evidence to assess the strength of other treatment options.

Keywords
Sarcopenia, diagnosis, therapy, muscle strength, aged, 80 and over, practice guideline
National Category
Geriatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373240 (URN)10.1007/s12603-018-1139-9 (DOI)000453666100003 ()
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3705-0725

Search in DiVA

Show all publications