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Sanchez-Rodriguez, D., Annweiler, C. & Cederholm, T. (2019). A translational approach for the clinical application of recently updated definitions of malnutrition (GLIM) and sarcopenia (EWGSOP2). Maturitas, 122, 89-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A translational approach for the clinical application of recently updated definitions of malnutrition (GLIM) and sarcopenia (EWGSOP2)
2019 (English)In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 122, p. 89-90Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380665 (URN)10.1016/j.maturitas.2018.11.013 (DOI)000461403200014 ()30497786 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Hill, T. R., Verlaan, S., Biesheuvel, E., Eastell, R., Bauer, J. M., Bautmans, I., . . . Aspray, T. J. (2019). A Vitamin D, Calcium and Leucine-Enriched Whey Protein Nutritional Supplement Improves Measures of Bone Health in Sarcopenic Non-Malnourished Older Adults: The PROVIDE Study. Calcified Tissue International, 105(4), 383-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Vitamin D, Calcium and Leucine-Enriched Whey Protein Nutritional Supplement Improves Measures of Bone Health in Sarcopenic Non-Malnourished Older Adults: The PROVIDE Study
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2019 (English)In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 383-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alterations in musculoskeletal health with advanced age contribute to sarcopenia and decline in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength. This decline may be modifiable via dietary supplementation. To test the hypothesis that a specific oral nutritional supplement can result in improvements in measures of bone health. Participants (n 380) were participants of the PROVIDE study, a 13-week, multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind, 2 parallel-group study among non-malnourished older participants (≥ 65 years) with sarcopenia [determined by Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; 0-12) scores between 4 and 9, and a low skeletal muscle mass index (SMI; skeletal muscle mass/BW × 100) ≤ 37% in men and ≤ 28% in women using bioelectric impedance analysis] Supplementation of a vitamin D, calcium and leucine-enriched whey protein drink that comprises a full range of micronutrients (active; 2/day) was compared with an iso-caloric control. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin; OC, procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide; P1NP) and resorption (carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks; CTX), insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and total-body BMD were analysed pre- and post-intervention. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased from 51.1 ± 22.9 nmol/L (mean ± SD) to 78.9 ± 21.1 nmol/L in the active group (p < 0.001 vs. control). Serum PTH showed a significant treatment difference (p < 0.001) with a decline in the active group, and increase in the control group. Serum IGF-1 increased in the active group (p < 0.001 vs. control). Serum CTX showed a greater decline in the active group (p = 0.001 vs. control). There were no significant differences in serum OC or P1NP between groups during the intervention. Total body BMD showed a small (0.02 g/cm2; ~ 2%) but significant increase in the active group after supplementation (p = 0.033 vs. control). Consuming a vitamin D, calcium and leucine-enriched whey protein supplement for 13 weeks improved 25(OH)D, suppressed PTH and had small but positive effects on BMD, indicative of improved bone health, in sarcopenic non-malnourished older adults.

Keywords
Vitamin D, Leucine, Intervention, Bone turnover, BMD, PROVIDE Study
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395421 (URN)10.1007/s00223-019-00581-6 (DOI)000486260300004 ()31338563 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
van Egmond, L., Tan, X., Sjögren, P., Cederholm, T. & Benedict, C. (2019). Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study. Nutrients, 11(5), Article ID 1029.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 1029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, little is known about how dietary patterns may link to measures of sleep quality in older subjects, who often suffer from sleep problems. Here, we investigated, in an older male population from Sweden (n = 970; aged 71 +/- 1 year), whether adherence to the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI; based on recommendations from the World Health Organization) or the Mediterranean Diet (MD) is linked to sleep disturbances. The diet scores were calculated using a seven-day food diary, and self-reported sleep initiation or maintenance problems were assessed by questionnaires. When adjusted for potential confounders, no associations between dietary scores and sleep parameters were found. In contrast, low consumption of milk and dairy products one of the dietary features of the MD was associated with better subjective sleep initiation. This association was, however, not found in men with adequate reports of daily energy intake (similar to 54% of the cohort). To summarize, our findings do not suggest that older men can mitigate perceived difficulties to fall and stay asleep by adhering to either the HDI or MD. Whether low consumption of milk and dairy products can facilitate sleep initiation must be confirmed in future studies by utilizing objective measures of sleep such as polysomnography. Finally, when investigating associations between dietary patterns and sleep, particular attention should be paid to the potential confounder of inadequate reporting of energy intake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
mediterranean diet, healthy diet indicator, sleep problems, elderly population, dietary adherence
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389873 (URN)10.3390/nu11051029 (DOI)000471021600089 ()31071943 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2019-07-31 Created: 2019-07-31 Last updated: 2019-07-31Bibliographically approved
Volkert, D., Kiesswetter, E., Cederholm, T., Donini, L. M., Egiseer, D., Norman, K., . . . Visser, M. (2019). Development of a Model on Determinants of Malnutrition in Aged Persons: A MaNuEL Project. Gerontology and geriatric medicine, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a Model on Determinants of Malnutrition in Aged Persons: A MaNuEL Project
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2019 (English)In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In older persons, the origin of malnutrition is often multifactorial with a multitude of factors involved. Presently, a common understanding about potential causes and their mode of action is lacking, and a consensus on the theoretical framework on the etiology of malnutrition does not exist. Within the European Knowledge Hub "Malnutrition in the Elderly (MaNuEL)," a model of "Determinants of Malnutrition in Aged Persons" (DoMAP) was developed in a multistage consensus process with live meetings and written feedback (modified Delphi process) by a multiprofessional group of 33 experts in geriatric nutrition. DoMAP consists of three triangle-shaped levels with malnutrition in the center, surrounded by the three principal conditions through which malnutrition develops in the innermost level: low intake, high requirements, and impaired nutrient bioavailability. The middle level consists of factors directly causing one of these conditions, and the outermost level contains factors indirectly causing one of the three conditions through the direct factors. The DoMAP model may contribute to a common understanding about the multitude of factors involved in the etiology of malnutrition, and about potential causative mechanisms. It may serve as basis for future research and may also be helpful in clinical routine to identify persons at increased risk of malnutrition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
older persons, malnutrition, determinants, etiology, model
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390676 (URN)10.1177/2333721419858438 (DOI)000475379700001 ()31259204 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Volkert, D., Beck, A. M., Cederholm, T., Cruz-Jentoft, A., Goisser, S., Hooper, L., . . . Bischoff, S. C. (2019). ESPEN guideline on clinical nutrition and hydration in geriatrics. Clinical Nutrition, 38(1), 10-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ESPEN guideline on clinical nutrition and hydration in geriatrics
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 10-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Malnutrition and dehydration are widespread in older people, and obesity is an increasing problem. In clinical practice, it is often unclear which strategies are suitable and effective in counteracting these key health threats.

Aim: To provide evidence-based recommendations for clinical nutrition and hydration in older persons in order to prevent and/or treat malnutrition and dehydration. Further, to address whether weight-reducing interventions are appropriate for overweight or obese older persons.

Methods: This guideline was developed according to the standard operating procedure for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers. A systematic literature search for systematic reviews and primary studies was performed based on 33 clinical questions in PICO format. Existing evidence was graded according to the SIGN grading system. Recommendations were developed and agreed in a multistage consensus process.

Results: We provide eighty-two evidence-based recommendations for nutritional care in older persons, covering four main topics: Basic questions and general principles, recommendations for older persons with malnutrition or at risk of malnutrition, recommendations for older patients with specific diseases, and recommendations to prevent, identify and treat dehydration. Overall, we recommend that all older persons shall routinely be screened for malnutrition in order to identify an existing risk early. Oral nutrition can be supported by nursing interventions, education, nutritional counseling, food modification and oral nutritional supplements. Enteral nutrition should be initiated if oral, and parenteral if enteral nutrition is insufficient or impossible and the general prognosis is altogether favorable. Dietary restrictions should generally be avoided, and weight-reducing diets shall only be considered in obese older persons with weight-related health problems and combined with physical exercise. All older persons should be considered to be at risk of low-intake dehydration and encouraged to consume adequate amounts of drinks. Generally, interventions shall be individualized, comprehensive and part of a multimodal and multidisciplinary team approach.

Conclusion: A range of effective interventions is available to support adequate nutrition and hydration in older persons in order to maintain or improve nutritional status and improve clinical course and quality of life. These interventions should be implemented in clinical practice and routinely used.

Keywords
Guideline, Recommendations, Geriatrics, Nutritional care, Malnutrition, Dehydration
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382669 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2018.05.024 (DOI)000463462400002 ()30005900 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, T. E., Cederholm, T. & Ekdahl, A. (2019). From Frailty to Gerastenia [Letter to the editor]. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 67(10), 2209-2210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Frailty to Gerastenia
2019 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 2209-2210Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398531 (URN)10.1111/jgs.16145 (DOI)000483288500001 ()31441505 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved
Jensen, G. L., Cederholm, T., Correia, M. I., Gonzalez, M. C., Fukushima, R., Higashiguchi, T., . . . Van Gossum, A. (2019). GLIM Criteria for the Diagnosis of Malnutrition: A Consensus Report From the Global Clinical Nutrition Community. JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 43(1), 32-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GLIM Criteria for the Diagnosis of Malnutrition: A Consensus Report From the Global Clinical Nutrition Community
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2019 (English)In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This initiative aims to build a global consensus around core diagnostic criteria for malnutrition in adults in clinical settings.

Methods: The Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) was convened by several of the major global clinical nutrition societies. Empirical consensus was reached through a series of face‐to‐face meetings, telephone conferences, and e‐mail communications.

Results: A 2‐step approach for the malnutrition diagnosis was selected, that is, first screening to identify at risk status by the use of any validated screening tool, and second, assessment for diagnosis and grading the severity of malnutrition. The malnutrition criteria for consideration were retrieved from existing approaches for screening and assessment. Potential criteria were subjected to a ballot among GLIM participants that selected 3 phenotypic criteria (non‐volitional weight loss, low body mass index, and reduced muscle mass) and 2 etiologic criteria (reduced food intake or assimilation, and inflammation or disease burden). To diagnose malnutrition at least 1 phenotypic criterion and 1 etiologic criterion should be present. Phenotypic metrics for grading severity are proposed. It is recommended that the etiologic criteria be used to guide intervention and anticipated outcomes. The recommended approach supports classification of malnutrition into four etiology‐related diagnosis categories.

Conclusions: A consensus scheme for diagnosing malnutrition in adults in clinical settings on a global scale is proposed. Next steps are to secure endorsements from leading nutrition professional societies, to identify overlaps with syndromes like cachexia and sarcopenia, and to promote dissemination, validation studies, and feedback. The construct should be re‐considered every 3–5 years.

Keywords
assessment, diagnosis, malnutrition, screening
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375844 (URN)10.1002/jpen.1440 (DOI)000455817700006 ()30175461 (PubMedID)
Note

This article is simultaneously published by The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism in the journal Clinical Nutrition (doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2018.08.002) and by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (doi:10.1002/jpen.1440) and will be subsequently published by The Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12383). Minor differences in style may appear in each publication, but the article is substantially the same in each journal.

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
Jernerén, F., Cederholm, T., Refsum, H., Smith, A. D., Turner, C., Palmblad, J., . . . Freund-Levi, Y. (2019). Homocysteine Status Modifies the Treatment Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Cognition in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease: The OmegAD Study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 69(1), 189-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Homocysteine Status Modifies the Treatment Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Cognition in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease: The OmegAD Study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Trials of supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids (omega 3-FAs) in patients with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease (AD) have produced inconsistent effects on cognitive decline. There is evidence of an interaction between B vitamin status and omega 3-FAs in relation to brain atrophy and cognitive decline.

Objective: We investigated whether baseline levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), a marker of B vitamin status, modify the effects of omega 3-FAs supplementation on cognitive performance in moderate AD.

Methods: This post hoc analysis of the OmegAD trial included 171 community-based patients with AD (MMSE >= 15): 88 patients received daily doses of 1.7 g docosahexaenoic acid and 0.6 g eicosapentaenoic acid for 6 months. Treatment outcome on cognition was analyzed according to baseline levels of tHcy using a general linear model and ANCOVA.

Results: We found significant interactions between omega 3-FA supplementation and tHcy on cognition and clinical stage assessed by MMSE (p = 0.040), global CDR (p = 0.059), and CDRsob (p = 0.023), but not on ADAS-cog (p = 0.649). In patients with tHcy levels <11.7 mu mol/L, omega 3-FA supplementation improved cognitive performance as measured by MMSE (+7.1%, 95% CI: 0.59 to 13.7%, p = 0.033) and clinical status as measured by CDRsob (-22.3%, 95% CI: -5.8 to -38.7%, p = 0.009) compared with placebo.

Conclusion: The effect of omega 3-FA supplementation on MMSE and CDR appears to be influenced by baseline tHcy, suggesting that adequate B vitamin status is required to obtain beneficial effects of omega 3-FA on cognition.

Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, B vitamins, cognition, dementia, homocysteine, omega-3 fatty acids
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384475 (URN)10.3233/JAD-181148 (DOI)000467519100017 ()30958356 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedThe Karolinska Institutet's Research FoundationStiftelsen Gamla TjänarinnorÅke Wiberg Foundation, M16-0251Swedish Nutrition Foundation (SNF)Gun och Bertil Stohnes StiftelseSwedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Cederholm, T. & Jensen, G. L. (2019). Invited commentary in response to: Development of a nutritional documentation tool: a Delphi study. British Journal of Nutrition, 121(12), 1321-1322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invited commentary in response to: Development of a nutritional documentation tool: a Delphi study
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 121, no 12, p. 1321-1322Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2019
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395365 (URN)10.1017/S0007114519000588 (DOI)000484149400001 ()30890198 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Volkert, D., Beck, A. M., Cederholm, T., Cereda, E., Cruz-Jentoft, A., Goisser, S., . . . Wirth, R. (2019). Management of Malnutrition in Older Patients: Current Approaches, Evidence and Open Questions. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 8(7), Article ID 974.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of Malnutrition in Older Patients: Current Approaches, Evidence and Open Questions
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2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 974Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malnutrition is widespread in older people and represents a major geriatric syndrome with multifactorial etiology and severe consequences for health outcomes and quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to describe current approaches and evidence regarding malnutrition treatment and to highlight relevant knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Recently published guidelines of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) provide a summary of the available evidence and highlight the wide range of different measures that can be taken-from the identification and elimination of potential causes to enteral and parenteral nutrition-depending on the patient's abilities and needs. However, more than half of the recommendations therein are based on expert consensus because of a lack of evidence, and only three are concern patient-centred outcomes. Future research should further clarify the etiology of malnutrition and identify the most relevant causes in order to prevent malnutrition. Based on limited and partly conflicting evidence and the limitations of existing studies, it remains unclear which interventions are most effective in which patient groups, and if specific situations, diseases or etiologies of malnutrition require specific approaches. Patient-relevant outcomes such as functionality and quality of life need more attention, and research methodology should be harmonised to allow for the comparability of studies.

Keywords
Geriatric patients, older persons, malnutrition, therapy, interventions
National Category
Nursing Nutrition and Dietetics Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393607 (URN)10.3390/jcm8070974 (DOI)000479004300005 ()31277488 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3705-0725

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