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Vikström, Johan
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Avdic, D., Lundborg, P. & Vikström, J. (2019). Estimating returns to hospital volume: Evidence from advanced cancer surgery. Journal of Health Economics, 63, 81-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating returns to hospital volume: Evidence from advanced cancer surgery
2019 (English)In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 63, p. 81-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-volume hospitals typically perform better than low-volume hospitals. In this paper, we study whether such patterns reflect a causal effect of case volume on patient outcomes. To this end, we exploit closures and openings of entire cancer clinics in Swedish hospitals which provides sharp and arguably exogenous variation in case volumes. Using detailed register data on more than 100,000 treatment episodes of advanced cancer surgery, our results suggest substantial positive effects of operation volume on survival. Complementary analyses point to learning-by-doing as an important explanation. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Hospital case volume, Learning-by-doing, Cancer surgery, Survival, Causal effect
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379774 (URN)10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.10.005 (DOI)000460716100006 ()30529091 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, DNR 2004-2005Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0826The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-21Bibliographically approved
Vikström, J., Ridder, G. & Weidner, M. (2018). Bounds on treatment effects on transitions. Journal of Econometrics, 205(2), 448-469
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bounds on treatment effects on transitions
2018 (English)In: Journal of Econometrics, ISSN 0304-4076, E-ISSN 1872-6895, Vol. 205, no 2, p. 448-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper considers the identification of treatment effects on conditional transition probabilities. We show that even under random assignment only the instantaneous average treatment effect is point identified. Since treated and control units drop out at different rates, randomization only ensures the comparability of treatment and controls at the time of randomization, so that long-run average treatment effects are not point identified. Instead, we derive bounds on these average effects. Our bounds do not impose (semi)parametric restrictions, for example, proportional hazards. We also explore assumptions such as monotone treatment response, common shocks and positively correlated outcomes that tighten the bounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2018
Keywords
Partial identification, Duration model, Randomized experiment, Treatment effect
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361259 (URN)10.1016/j.jeconom.2017.11.012 (DOI)000437976100007 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-2014-CoG-646917-ROMIAThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Available from: 2018-10-11 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved
Farbmacher, H., Guber, R. & Vikström, J. (2018). Increasing the credibility of the twin birth instrument. Journal of applied econometrics (Chichester, England), 33(3), 457-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the credibility of the twin birth instrument
2018 (English)In: Journal of applied econometrics (Chichester, England), ISSN 0883-7252, E-ISSN 1099-1255, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 457-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twin births are an important instrument for the endogenous fertility decision. However, twin births are not exogenous either as dizygotic twinning is correlated with maternal characteristics. Following the medical literature, we assume that monozygotic twins are exogenous, and construct a new instrument, which corrects for the selection although monozygotic twinning is usually unobserved in survey and administrative datasets. Using administrative data from Sweden, we show that the usual twin instrument is related to observed and unobserved determinants of economic outcomes, while our new instrument is not. In our applications we find that the classical twin instrument underestimates the negative effect of fertility on labor income. This finding is in line with the observation that high earners are more likely to delay childbearing and hence have a higher risk to get dizygotic twins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352707 (URN)10.1002/jae.2616 (DOI)000429712400009 ()
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lombardi, S., Nordström Skans, O. & Vikström, J. (2018). Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance. Paper presented at 29th Annual Conference of the European-Association-of-Labour-Economists, SEP 21-23, 2017, St Gallen, SWITZERLAND. Labour Economics, 53, 33-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance
2018 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 53, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper studies how targeted wage subsidies affect the performance of the recruiting firms. Using Swedish administrative data from the period 1998-2008, we show that treated firms substantially outperform other recruiting firms after hiring through subsidies, despite identical pre-treatment performance levels and trends in a wide set of key dimensions. The pattern is less clear from 2007 onwards, after a reform removed the involvement of caseworkers from the subsidy approval process. Overall, our results suggest that targeted employment subsidies can have large positive effects on post-match outcomes of the hiring firms, at least if the policy environment allows for pre-screening by caseworkers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Wage subsidies, Labor demand, Firms performance
National Category
Economics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365988 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2018.04.002 (DOI)000444660100003 ()
Conference
29th Annual Conference of the European-Association-of-Labour-Economists, SEP 21-23, 2017, St Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00886
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Vikström, J. (2017). Dynamic treatment assignment and evaluation of active labor market policies. Labour Economics, 49, 42-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic treatment assignment and evaluation of active labor market policies
2017 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 49, p. 42-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper considers treatment evaluation in a discrete time setting in which treatment can start at any point in time. We consider evaluation under unconfoundedness and propose a dynamic inverse probability weighting estimator. A typical application is an active labor market program that can start after any elapsed unemployment duration. The identification and estimation results concern both cases with one single treatment as well as sequences of programs. The new estimator is applied to Swedish data on participants in a training program and a work practice program. The work practice program increases re-employment rates. Most sequences of the two programs are inefficient when compared to one single program episode.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
Keywords
Program evaluation, Treatment effects, Work practice, Training, Survival time
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341817 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2017.09.003 (DOI)000419415900004 ()
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
van den Berg, G. J., Lundborg, P. & Vikström, J. (2017). The Economics of Grief. Economic Journal, 127(604), 1794-1832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Economics of Grief
2017 (English)In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, no 604, p. 1794-1832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study the short-run and long-run economic impact of one of the largest losses that an individual can face; the death of a child. We utilise unique registers on the entire Swedish population, combining information on the date and cause of death with parental outcomes. We exploit the longitudinal dimension of the data and deal with several selection issues. Losing a child has adverse effects on labour income, employment status, marital status and hospitalisation. The value of policy measures aimed at preventing mortal accidents of children is underestimated if it does not take bereavement effects on parents into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335701 (URN)10.1111/ecoj.12399 (DOI)000408935000003 ()
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, J. & Wikström, J. (2016). Human fertilizer and the productivity of farming households. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, 40(1), 48-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human fertilizer and the productivity of farming households
2016 (English)In: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, ISSN 2168-3565, E-ISSN 2168-3573, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 48-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological sanitation offers both sanitation and fertilizer through recycling of nutrients. Human fertilizer provides a close to free addition of nutrients in household farming and may, therefore, decrease the downward risk of fertilizer adoption. We study an ecological sanitation investment program in southern Mali, where just over 150 beneficiaries got a urine diverting dry toilet installed. Our results suggest that the average household in our study is able to produce amounts of N, P, and K equivalent to around a fourth of its yearly expenditures on artificial fertilizers, corresponding to a yearly addition of nutrients or a yearly reduction in fertilizer expenditures to a value of about 50 Euro. However, the quantity and quality of N, P, and K actually retained is found to be only a fraction of this potential amount. Using propensity score matching methods, we find an increase in maize yields among beneficiary households, but no effect on the yields of other crops. Moreover, households substitute artificial fertilizer with human fertilizer at 10-15% of the average household use of artificial fertilizers. Thus, the substitution may worsen an already bad soil nutrient balance. Higher retention levels are needed for solutions to prove financially viable.

Keywords
Ecological sanitation, fertilizer, household productivity, Mali, matching, UDDT
National Category
Other Agricultural Sciences not elsewhere specified Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270919 (URN)10.1080/21683565.2015.1100694 (DOI)000365609400004 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2016-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Sjögren, A. & Vikström, J. (2015). How long and how much?: Learning about the design of wage subsidies from policy changes and discontinuities. Labour Economics, 34, 127-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How long and how much?: Learning about the design of wage subsidies from policy changes and discontinuities
2015 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 34, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Employment and wage subsidies are used to combat long-term unemployment, yet there is little research to guide the design of such programs. Discontinuities and changes in the design and implementation of wage subsidies under the Swedish New Start Jobs-policy allow us to study effects of both subsidy rate and subsidy duration. We find that wage subsidies have substantial effect on job-finding rates for those eligible. The effect is stronger for larger subsidies and more than doubles as the length of the subsidy doubles. Although employment drops as subsidies expire, the probability of being employed remains higher for workers finding subsidized employment also after the expiry of the employment subsidies.

Keywords
Wage-subsidies, Subsidy duration, Unemployment duration, Subsidy rate, Policy design, Long-term employment
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-257016 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2015.03.009 (DOI)000355883600011 ()
Available from: 2015-06-29 Created: 2015-06-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Andersson, E., Lundborg, P. & Vikström, J. (2015). Income receipt and mortality: Evidence from Swedish public sector employees. Journal of Public Economics, 131, 21-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Income receipt and mortality: Evidence from Swedish public sector employees
2015 (English)In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 131, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we study the short-run effect of salary receipt on mortality among Swedish public sector employees. By exploiting variation in paydays across work-places, we completely control for mortality patterns related to, for example, public holidays and other special days or events coinciding with paydays and for general within-month and within-week mortality patterns. We find a dramatic increase in mortality on the day that salaries arrive. The increase is especially pronounced for younger workers and for deaths due to activity-related causes such as heart conditions and strokes. The effect is entirely driven by an increase in mortality among low income individuals, who are more likely to experience liquidity constraints. All things considered, our results suggest that an increase in general economic activity on salary receipt is an important cause of the excess mortality.

Keywords
Income, Mortality, Health, Consumption, Liquidity constraints, Permanent income hypothesis
National Category
Sociology Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269983 (URN)10.1016/j.jpubeco.2015.08.006 (DOI)000365056600003 ()
Available from: 2015-12-19 Created: 2015-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hesselius, P., Johansson, P. & Vikström, J. (2013). Social Behaviour in Work Absence. Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 115(4), 995-1019
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Behaviour in Work Absence
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 995-1019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By making use of a large-scale randomized experiment, we test whether social behaviour is important for work absence due to illness. The individuals treated in the experiment were exposed to less monitoring of their eligibility to collect sickness insurance benefits, which sharply increased their non-monitored work absence. This exogenous variation is exploited in two complementary analyses. In both analyses, we find significant social-behaviour effects. Using detailed data, we conclude that the social-behaviour effects most likely stem from fairness concerns.

Keywords
Fairness, social insurance, social interactions
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210231 (URN)10.1111/sjoe.12030 (DOI)000325009000002 ()
Available from: 2013-11-05 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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