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Hallqvist, Johan
Publications (10 of 144) Show all publications
Quintana, H. K., Janszky, I., Kanar, A., Gigante, B., Druid, H., Ahlbom, A., . . . Leander, K. (2018). Comorbidities in relation to fatali of first myocardial infarction. Cardiovascular pathology, 32, 32-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidities in relation to fatali of first myocardial infarction
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2018 (English)In: Cardiovascular pathology, ISSN 1054-8807, E-ISSN 1879-1336, Vol. 32, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Present knowledge concerning potential associations between comorbidities and the fatality of a first myocardial infarction (MI) is limited.

Aim: To identify comorbidities in 45-70-year-old individuals who suffered a first MI and died within 7 days in Stockholm County from 1992-1994. In addition, to assess how each of the comorbidities identified, as well as the number of hospitalizations during the 10-year period prior to the MI, was associated with MI fatality.

Methods: The data collected on our inception cohort of 1984 first Ml, of which 524 were fatal within 7 days, were primarily self-reported, proxy-reported by questionnaire and/or extracted from comprehensive national registers. Comorbidilies among fatal cases with a prevalence >2% were identified. Risk ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) for the association of Ml fatality with number of prior hospitalizations and specific comorbidities were calculated using binomial regression with log link. A structured review of autopsy reports on fatal cases was performed in order to identify additional indicators of comorbidities.

Results: After adjusting for sex, age and disposable income, the number of previous hospitalizations was associated with 7-day Ml fatality. Of the comorbidities identified as prevalent in fatal cases, the following were associated with 7-day fatality in crude analysis: epilepsy, heart failure, stroke, alcoholism, cancer, renal diseases, asthma, psychiatric diseases, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Indicators of comorbidities identified from autopsy data included a silent MI, severe atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta, and hepatic steatosis. Adjustments for sex and age (although not possible for epilepsy and alcoholism), did not substantially alter results.

Conclusions: Our current findings indicate that in connection with a first MI, particular attention should be paid to those with repeated prior hospitalizations and/or epilepsy, heart failure, stroke, alcoholism, cancer, renal diseases, asthma, psychiatric diseases, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
Keywords
Myocardial infarction, Fatality, Comorbiclity
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341324 (URN)10.1016/j.carpath.2017.11.002 (DOI)000419095700006 ()29175662 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareStockholm County CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation, 2015-0562
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Hermansson, J., Hallqvist, J., Karlsson, B., Knutsson, A. & Gadin, K. G. (2018). Shift work, parental cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction in males. Occupational Medicine, 68(2), 120-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shift work, parental cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction in males
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2018 (English)In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Shift work has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is a need for more studies to determine whether there is an interaction between shift work and other risk factors of CVD, thereby increasing the risk of CVD in shift workers. Aims To discern whether shift work and parental mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) or sudden cardiac death (SCD) interact to increase the risk of MI in men. Methods A case-control dataset was used to assess interaction between shift work and parental history of CVD, using death from MI or SCD, or death before age 65, on an additive scale. Results were reported as relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) and synergy index (SI). Results There was an interaction between shift work and paternal mortality from MI or SCD, when both factors were present [SI = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02. 5.6 and AP = 0.4; 95% CI 0.08. 0.73]. Conclusions Paternal mortality from MI or SCD interacts with shift work to increase the risk of MI in men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Cardiovascular disease, case-control study, heredity, interaction, risk factor
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352738 (URN)10.1093/occmed/kqy008 (DOI)000429448800010 ()29444274 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bean, C., Pingel, R., Berg, N., Hallqvist, J. & Hammarström, A. (2017). A 4-way decomposition analysis of poor social relations and depressive symptoms over the life-course. In: European Journal of Public Health, Volume 27, Issue suppl_3: . Paper presented at 10th European Public Health Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 4-way decomposition analysis of poor social relations and depressive symptoms over the life-course
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, Volume 27, Issue suppl_3, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333174 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.310 (DOI)000414389801080 ()
Conference
10th European Public Health Conference
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Rasmussen-Barr, E., Grooten, W. J. A., Hallqvist, J., Holm, L. W. & Skillgate, E. (2017). Are job strain and sleep disturbances prognostic factors for low-back pain?: A cohort study of a general population of working age in Sweden. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 49(7), 591-597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are job strain and sleep disturbances prognostic factors for low-back pain?: A cohort study of a general population of working age in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 591-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether job strain, i.e. a combination of job demands and decision latitude (job control), and sleep disturbances among persons with occasional low-back pain are prognostic factors for developing troublesome low-back pain; and to determine whether sleep disturbances modify the potential association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. Methods: A population-based cohort from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort surveys in 2006 and 2010 (n = 25,167) included individuals with occasional low-back pain at baseline 2006 (n = 6,413). Through logistic regression analyses, potential prognostic effects of job strain and sleep disturbances were studied. Stratified analyses were performed to assess modification of sleep disturbances on the potential association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. Results: Those exposed to job strain; active job (odds ratio (OR) 1.3, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-1.6), or high strain (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.9-2.4) and those exposed to severe sleep disturbances (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.0), but not those exposed to passive jobs (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) had higher odds of developing troublesome low-back pain. Sleep disturbances did not modify the association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. Conclusion: These findings indicate that active job, high job strain and sleep disturbances are prognostic factors for troublesome low-back pain. The odds of developing troublesome low-back pain due to job strain were not modified by sleep disturbance.

Keywords
musculoskeletal disorder, prevention, stress, job strain, sleep disturbance, low back pain
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330030 (URN)10.2340/16501977-2249 (DOI)000404843500009 ()28657642 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilAFA Insurance
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Skillgate, E., Pico-Espinosa, O. J., Hallqvist, J., Bohman, T. & Holm, L. W. (2017). Healthy lifestyle behavior and risk of long duration troublesome neck pain or low back pain among men and women: results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort. Clinical Epidemiology, 9, 491-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy lifestyle behavior and risk of long duration troublesome neck pain or low back pain among men and women: results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 9, p. 491-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The role of healthy lifestyle behavior (HLB) in terms of physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking, and diet put together has not yet been explored for the risk of low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP). Our aim was to study if an HLB is protective against the onset of long duration troublesome LBP and NP in men and women.

Methods: Two cohorts from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort, free from LBP (n=12,483) and NP (n=10,539), respectively, in 2006, were surveyed with questionnaires. Baseline information about physical activity, alcohol intake, diet, and smoking were dichotomized into being healthy/not healthy and combined in a categorical variable according to the number of healthy behaviors present. Binomial regression analyses were used to evaluate the role of HLB for the outcomes 4 years later.

Results: When men with three or four healthy lifestyles were compared to men with none or one, the risk ratio (RR) of LBP was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-1.02). The corresponding RR for LBP in women was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.56-1.32). When men with three or four healthy lifestyles were compared to men with none or one, the RR for NP was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.74-1.71). The corresponding RR for NP in women was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.35-0.77).

Conclusion: An HLB seems to be protective for long duration troublesome LBP in men, and for long duration troublesome NP in women.

Keywords
neck pain, low back pain, lifestyle, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, healthy diet, prevention, musculoskeletal
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337769 (URN)10.2147/CLEP.S145264 (DOI)000412835000001 ()29066933 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Quintana, H. K., Janszky, I., Gigante, B., Druid, H., Ahlbom, A., Hallqvist, J., . . . Leander, K. (2016). Diabetes, hypertension, overweight and hyperlipidemia and 7-day case-fatality in first myocardial infarction. International Journal of Cardiology Metabolic & Endocrine, 12, 30-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diabetes, hypertension, overweight and hyperlipidemia and 7-day case-fatality in first myocardial infarction
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology Metabolic & Endocrine, E-ISSN 2214-7624, Vol. 12, p. 30-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Out-of-hospital deaths due to a first myocardial infarction (MI) are frequent and a big challenge for prevention. Increased knowledge about factors influencing MI fatality is needed. Metabolic risk factors have been studied in relation to MI fatality in-hospital but studies considering also out-of-hospital deaths are few. Aim: To assess howdiabetes and other metabolic risk factors associate with death within 7 days after first time MI among subjects aged between 45 and 70 identified in Stockholm County 1992-1994. Methods: Data were collected using questionnaires (close relatives of fatal cases were asked to fill the questionnaire), physical examinations, national registers and autopsy reports. Risk ratios (RR) of 7-day MI fatality with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with the risk factors under study were calculated using binomial regression with log link. Results: Out of 1905 first time MI cases included, 524 died within 7 days. After adjustments for age, sex, current smoking, education and general comorbidity, diabetes, but not hypertension and hyperlipidemia, was associated with MI fatality (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.20-2.28). Overweight, as compared to normal BMI, was inversely associated with MI fatality (multiple adjusted RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.94); obesity results pointed in the samedirection (multiple adjusted RR 0.79, 0.52-1.16). Conclusions: In this population-based inception cohort study, diabetes but not hypertension and hyperlipidemia were associated with MI fatality. This further emphasizes the importance of diabetes as a cardiovascular risk factor and the need for close surveillance of diabetic patients. Overweight was however associated with decreased MI fatality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
Keywords
Fatality, Diabetes, Hyperlipidemia, Hypertension, Myocardial infarction, Obesity, Overweight, 7-day fatality
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Endocrinology and Diabetes Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319410 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcme.2016.05.009 (DOI)000395272000006 ()
Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Sundgren, E., Hallqvist, J. & Fredriksson, L. (2016). Health for smokers with schizophrenia: a struggle to maintain a dignified life. Disability and Rehabilitation, 38(5), 416-422
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health for smokers with schizophrenia: a struggle to maintain a dignified life
2016 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 416-422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate the health and lifestyle habits of smokers with schizophrenia and describe their experience of smoking in relation to health.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with 10 smokers with schizophrenia were conducted in Sweden from May to October 2013. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used to describe and interpret respondents' experiences.

FINDINGS: Good health for a person with schizophrenia was defined as accepting their mental illness, having strategies to gain control over psychotic symptoms, and engaging in activities and good relationships. Lifestyle habits were described as structures in the respondents' daily life: arising in the morning, taking a cigarette, reading the newspaper, eating breakfast and doing the things planned for the day.

CONCLUSION: The meaning of health for smokers with schizophrenia is not the same as being well or ill. Rather, health is an experience of a struggle to maintain a dignified life, including self-acceptance of the mental illness and control over the psychotic symptoms. People with schizophrenia have high willingness but low motivation to stop smoking because they fear that cigarette withdrawal will increase their psychotic symptoms. Therefore, they find it difficult to stop smoking. To succeed with health care intervention, health care providers must understand the life style habits and experiences specific to smokers with schizophrenia and the unique experience of health and life style habits that people with schizophrenia experience.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267015 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2015.1044033 (DOI)000367834600002 ()25958996 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Quintana, H. K., Vikstrom, M., Andersson, T., Hallqvist, J. & Leander, K. (2015). Agreement between Myocardial Infarction Patients and Their Spouses on Reporting of Data on 82 Cardiovascular Risk Exposures. PLoS ONE, 10(7), Article ID e0132601.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between Myocardial Infarction Patients and Their Spouses on Reporting of Data on 82 Cardiovascular Risk Exposures
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e0132601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The validity of exposure data collected from proxy respondents of myocardial infarction patients has scarcely been studied. We assessed the level of disagreement between myocardial infarction patients and their spouses with respect to the reporting of the patient's cardiovascular risk exposures. Methods Within the frame of the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program (SHEEP), a case-control study of risk factors of myocardial infarction performed in Stockholm county 1992-1994, a subset of 327 first time myocardial infarction cases aged 45-70 who survived >28 days after the event and who co-habited with a spouse or common-law spouse (proxy) were identified between 1993-04-05 and 1993-12-31. Among these, 243 cases participated along with their respective proxy in the present study. Control individuals, matched to cases by age, sex and residential area were also included (n = 243). Data were collected using questionnaires. Using conditional logistic regression we calculated for each of 82 exposures the odds ratio based on information collected from 1) myocardial infarction cases and controls [odds ratio A] and 2) proxies and the same set of controls [odds ratio B]. Disagreement was measured by calculating the ratio between odds ratio B and odds ratio A with 95% confidence intervals (CI) calculated using resampling bootstrap. Results For the vast majority of the exposures considered including diet, smoking, education, work-related stress, and family history of CVD, there was no statistically significant disagreement between myocardial infarction patients and proxies (n = 243 pairs). However, leisure time physical inactivity (proxy bias = 1.59, 95% CI 1.05-3.57) was overestimated by spouses compared to myocardial infarction patients. A few other exposures including some sleep-related problems and work-related issues also showed disagreement. Conclusions Myocardial infarction patients and their spouses similarly reported data on a wide range of exposures including the majority of the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, leisure time physical inactivity being an exception.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260629 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0132601 (DOI)000358162300157 ()26161850 (PubMedID)
Note

This study was supported by grants from the Swedish Council for Work Life and Social Research (http://www.forte.se/en/) and the Stockholm County Council (http://www.sll.se/om-landstinget/Information-in-English1/). In addition, a grant from the ERACOL (http://erasmus-columbus.eu/about/) an Erasmus Mundus Target 2 program, was awarded to HKQ.

Available from: 2015-08-21 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hermansson, J., Gillander Gådin, K., Karlsson, B., Reuterwall, C., Hallqvist, J. & Knutsson, A. (2015). Case fatality of myocardial infarction among shift workers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 88(5), 599-605
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case fatality of myocardial infarction among shift workers
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2015 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 88, no 5, p. 599-605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Shift work has been associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and more specifically myocardial infarction (MI). The majority of the studies that found a positive association between shift work and CVD have been based on incidence data. The results from studies on cardiovascular-related mortality among shift workers have shown little or no elevated mortality associated with shift work. None of the previous studies have analysed short-term mortality (case fatality) after MI. Therefore, we investigated whether shift work is associated with increased case fatality after MI compared with day workers.

METHODS: Data on incident cases with first MI were obtained from case-control study conducted in two geographical sites in Sweden (Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program and Västernorrland Heart Epidemiology Program), including 1,542 cases (1,147 men and 395 women) of MI with complete working time information and 65 years or younger. Case fatality was defined as death within 28 days of onset of MI. Risk estimates were calculated using logistic regression.

RESULTS: The crude odds ratios for case fatality among male shift workers were 1.63 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12, 2.38] and 0.56 (95 % CI 0.26, 1.18) for female shift workers compared with day workers. Adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes type II and socio-economic status did not alter the results.

CONCLUSION: Shift work was associated with increased risk of case fatality among male shift workers after the first MI.

National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236840 (URN)10.1007/s00420-014-0984-z (DOI)000354624400007 ()25261317 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Froberg, F., Modin, B., Rosendahl, I. K., Tengstrom, A. & Hallqvist, J. (2015). The Association Between Compulsory School Achievement and Problem Gambling Among Swedish Young People. Journal of Adolescent Health, 56(4), 420-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Association Between Compulsory School Achievement and Problem Gambling Among Swedish Young People
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 420-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: We aimed to examine the association between school grades at the age of 16 years and problem gambling at the age of 17-25 years among Swedish females and males. Methods: In a cohort design, we followed the 16-to 24-year-old participants in the representative Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study for 2 years, 2008/2009 and 2009/2010, generating 3,816 person-years of follow-up time. The outcome, incidence of mild and moderate/severe gambling problems, was measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index in telephone interviews. The exposure was register-linked information about final grades in compulsory school. The association between school grades and problem gambling was estimated in multinomial logistic regressions. Results: Low and average school grades were associated with increased incidence of mild and moderate/severe problem gambling compared to high grades, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, psychological distress, and alcohol use. Low grades, compared to high grades, were associated with a higher risk of mild gambling problems for adolescent males, whereas the incidence proportion of moderate/severe problem gambling was high for males aged 20-25 years with low grades, among whom unemployment was also very high. Furthermore, we found a strong and graded association between school grades and moderate/severe problem gambling for women in both age groups, despite a low prevalence of gambling participation among females compared to males. Conclusions: Our findings show that Swedish youth with low school achievement have an increased risk of gambling problems up to 8 years after school graduation, after control for confounding from sociodemographic characteristics, psychological distress, and alcohol use, and that this association is stronger for females than males.

Keywords
Sweden, Problem gambling, Gambling, School achievement, Youth, Young people, Cohort
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251985 (URN)10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.12.007 (DOI)000351698100012 ()25659200 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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