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Fjelde, Hanne
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Fjelde, H., Hultman, L. & Nilsson, D. (2019). Protection through Presence: UN Peacekeeping and the Costs of Targeting Civilians. International Organization, 73(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protection through Presence: UN Peacekeeping and the Costs of Targeting Civilians
2019 (English)In: International Organization, ISSN 0020-8183, Vol. 73, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354931 (URN)10.1017/S0020818318000346 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-09-10
Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2018). Ethnic Politics and Elite Competition: The Roots of Electoral Violence in Kenya (1ed.). In: Mimmi Söderberg Kovacs; Jesper Bjarnesen (Ed.), Violence in African Elections: Between Democracy and Big Man Politics (pp. 27-46). London: Zed Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Politics and Elite Competition: The Roots of Electoral Violence in Kenya
2018 (English)In: Violence in African Elections: Between Democracy and Big Man Politics / [ed] Mimmi Söderberg Kovacs; Jesper Bjarnesen, London: Zed Books, 2018, 1, p. 27-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Zed Books, 2018 Edition: 1
Keywords
elections, violence, Kenya
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351655 (URN)978-1-78699-228-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Fjelde, H. & Nilsson, D. (2018). The Rise of Rebel Contenders: Barriers to entry and fragmentation in civil wars. Journal of Peace Research, 55(5), 551-565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Rise of Rebel Contenders: Barriers to entry and fragmentation in civil wars
2018 (English)In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, E-ISSN 1460-3578, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 551-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337943 (URN)10.1177/0022343318767497 (DOI)000441283400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01235Swedish Research Council, 421-2009-1833Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS 14-1701:1Swedish Research Council, Norska forskningsrådet, 250-441
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
von Uexkull, N., Croicu, M., Fjelde, H. & Buhaug, H. (2016). Civil conflict sensitivity to growing-season drought. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(44), 12391-12396
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Civil conflict sensitivity to growing-season drought
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 44, p. 12391-12396Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, the research community has failed to reach a consensus on the nature and significance of the relationship between climate variability and armed conflict. We argue that progress has been hampered by insufficient attention paid to the context in which droughts and other climatic extremes may increase the risk of violent mobilization. Addressing this shortcoming, this study presents an actor-oriented analysis of the drought-conflict relationship, focusing specifically on politically relevant ethnic groups and their sensitivity to growing-season drought under various political and socioeconomic contexts. To this end, we draw on new conflict event data that cover Asia and Africa, 1989-2014, updated spatial ethnic settlement data, and remote sensing data on agricultural land use. Our procedure allows quantifying, for each ethnic group, drought conditions during the growing season of the locally dominant crop. A comprehensive set of multilevel mixed effects models that account for the groups' livelihood, economic, and political vulnerabilities reveals that a drought under most conditions has little effect on the short-term risk that a group challenges the state by military means. However, for agriculturally dependent groups as well as politically excluded groups in very poor countries, a local drought is found to increase the likelihood of sustained violence. We interpret this as evidence of the reciprocal relationship between drought and conflict, whereby each phenomenon makes a group more vulnerable to the other.

Keywords
armed conflict, climate variability, drought, ethnicity, georeferenced event data
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308910 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1607542113 (DOI)000386608200038 ()27791091 (PubMedID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencyEU, European Research Council, 648291
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2016). Electoral Institutions and Electoral Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa. British Journal of Political Science, 46(2), 297-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electoral Institutions and Electoral Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Political Science, ISSN 0007-1234, E-ISSN 1469-2112, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 297-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Political violence remains a pervasive feature of electoral dynamics in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, even where multiparty elections have become the dominant mode of regulating access to political power. With cross-national data on electoral violence in Sub-Saharan African elections between 1990 and 2010, this article develops and tests a theory that links the use of violent electoral tactics to the high stakes put in place by majoritarian electoral institutions. It is found that electoral violence is more likely in countries that employ majoritarian voting rules and elect fewer legislators from each district. Majoritarian institutions are, as predicted by theory, particularly likely to provoke violence where large ethno-political groups are excluded from power and significant economic inequalities exist.

Keywords
violence, elections, Africa
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281929 (URN)10.1017/S0007123414000179 (DOI)000373392700004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421/2010/1515
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Fjelde, H., Hultman, L. & Lindberg Bromley, S. (2016). Offsetting Losses: Bargaining Power and Rebel Attacks on Peacekeepers. International Studies Quarterly, 60(4), 611-623
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Offsetting Losses: Bargaining Power and Rebel Attacks on Peacekeepers
2016 (English)In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 611-623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, international third parties have increasingly sought to manage the dire consequences of civil war, often by deploying peacekeeping operations. However, peacekeepers sometimes face deliberate attacks by armed groups. These attacks hamper efforts to provide humanitarian relief and security. This raises a critical question: what factors lead rebel groups to target peacekeepers? We argue that internal conflict dynamics are important for explaining this phenomenon. Rebels attack peacekeepers as an alternative strategy to undermine incumbent regimes. They adopt this strategy as the balance of power turns against them in their struggle against governments. We evaluate our argument using a novel event data set on violent attacks on peacekeepers in sub-Saharan Africa from 1989 to 2009. We find a positive relationship between rebel losses and violent attacks on peacekeepers. These findings hold when controlling for mission-specific characteristics, time-invariant unobserved heterogeneity, and across different model specifications.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314273 (URN)10.1093/isq/sqw017 (DOI)000392925300003 ()
Available from: 2017-02-01 Created: 2017-02-01 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Sandbrook, C., Fjelde, H. & Setten, G. (2016). Transboundary Conservation and Conflict [Review]. Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, 70(2), 127-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transboundary Conservation and Conflict
2016 (English)In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 127-128Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300396 (URN)000378162700006 ()
Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Fjelde, H. (2015). Farming or Fighting?: Agricultural Price Shocks and Civil War in Africa. World Development, 67, 525-534
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Farming or Fighting?: Agricultural Price Shocks and Civil War in Africa
2015 (English)In: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 67, p. 525-534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article links lower economic returns in the labor-intensive agricultural sector to a higher risk of armed conflict at the local level. It argues that income shocks, followed by rising unemployment and lower wages in the rural economy, facilitate rebel recruitment and strengthen civilian support for rebel movements. Focusing on Africa, the article introduces a location-specific measure of changes to the value of local agricultural output by combining sub-national crop production maps with data on movements in global agricultural prices. The results show that negative changes to the local agricultural price index significantly and substantially increase the risk of violent events.

Keywords
economic shocks, income shocks, agricultural prices, civil war, armed conflict
National Category
Other Social Sciences Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247501 (URN)10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.10.032 (DOI)000348620000037 ()
Available from: 2015-03-19 Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Brosché, J., Brounéus, K., Fjelde, H., Forsberg, E., Hegre, H., Hultman, L., . . . Wallensteen, P. (2015). Nio punkter för global fred (Nine Points for Global Peace). Uppsala: Uppsala Nya Tidning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nio punkter för global fred (Nine Points for Global Peace)
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2015 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Insatserna för global fred måste stärkas skriver tolv företrädare för institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning apropå att världens ledare samlas i dag i New York för att anta 17 nya globala mål för en bättre värld och mer hållbar utveckling.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala Nya Tidning, 2015
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331931 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-26
Buhaug, H., Nordkvelle, J., Bernauer, T., Böhmelt, T., Brzoska, M., Busby, J. W., . . . von Uexküll, N. (2014). One effect to rule them all?: A comment on climate and conflict. Climatic Change, 127(3-4), 391-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One effect to rule them all?: A comment on climate and conflict
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2014 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 127, no 3-4, p. 391-397Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

A recent Climatic Change review article reports a remarkable convergence of scientific evidence for a link between climatic events and violent intergroup conflict, thus departing markedly from other contemporary assessments of the empirical literature. This commentary revisits the review in order to understand the discrepancy. We believe the origins of the disagreement can be traced back to the review article's underlying quantitative meta-analysis, which suffers from shortcomings with respect to sample selection and analytical coherence. A modified assessment that addresses some of these problems suggests that scientific research on climate and conflict to date has produced mixed and inconclusive results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2014
National Category
Environmental Sciences Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240868 (URN)10.1007/s10584-014-1266-1 (DOI)000345372000001 ()
Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
ViEWS: a political Violence Early Warning System; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Hegre, H., Hultman, L. & Nygård, H. M. Evaluating the conflict-reducing effect of UN peacekeeping operations. Journal of Politics
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