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Nissling, Anders
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Hinrichsen, H.-H. -., Petereit, C., von Dewitz, B., Haslob, H., Ustups, D., Florin, A.-B. -. & Nissling, A. (2018). Biophysical modeling of survival and dispersal of Central and Eastern Baltic Sea flounder (Platichthys flesus) larvae. Journal of Sea Research, 142, 11-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biophysical modeling of survival and dispersal of Central and Eastern Baltic Sea flounder (Platichthys flesus) larvae
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sea Research, ISSN 1385-1101, Vol. 142, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The period of larval drift into a suitable nursery area is considered to be of great significance for recruitment variability in flatfish. Here, a hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian particle tracking technique was utilized to study the drift from the first feeding larval stage until time of settlement of Central and Eastern Baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus), originating from spawning in the Baltic Sea deep basins, the Arkona- and Bornholm basin (central Baltic Sea), and the Gdansk deep and Gotland basin (eastern Baltic Sea). We examined the spatio-temporal dynamics of the probability to settle in preferred nursery habitat by detailed drift model simulations. The study suggests that the majority of larvae (89% and 74% for Central- and Eastern Baltic flounder, respectively) drift towards coastal areas and settle at metamorphosis ≤20 km from a sandy habitat enabling further migration to a preferred nursery area, i.e. larval drift seems not to be a major bottleneck in recruitment of flounder spawning in the Baltic Sea deep basins. The drift model results suggest that Central Baltic flounder utilize nursery areas mainly in the central and western Baltic, and in the Kattegat, whereas Eastern Baltic flounder mainly utilize the coast in the central and eastern Baltic. Thus, the two stock components seem to use different nursery areas following settlement. Further, in accordance with the “nursery size hypothesis”, the model demonstrates that larvae from the Bornholm basin, utilizing areas with extensive distribution of preferred nursery habitat, display the highest relative successful transport to nursery grounds until settling (72% of successfully settled larvae), suggesting that spawning in the Bornholm Basin is of great importance for stock recruitment of deep basin spawning Baltic flounder.

Keywords
Flounder juvenile habitat suitability, Hydrodynamic modeling, Larval drift, Particle tracking, Sediment type-related mortality
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369345 (URN)10.1016/j.seares.2018.09.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12
Nissling, A. & Larsson, R. (2018). Population specific sperm production in European flounder Platichthys flesus: Adaptation to salinity at spawning. Journal of Fish Biology, 93(1), 47-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population specific sperm production in European flounder Platichthys flesus: Adaptation to salinity at spawning
2018 (English)In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine teleosts inhabiting the brackish Baltic Sea have adapted to the less saline water with activation of spermatozoa at low salinity hypo-osmotic conditions but with shorter longevity and lower swimming speed that affect the fertilization capacity. Aiming to elucidate if the fertilization capacity may be maintained by increasing the number of spermatozoa produced, testis size for the euryhaline flounder Platichthys flesus with external fertilization was assessed along a salinity gradient; with spawning at a salinity of c. 7, 10-18 and 30-35. Fulton's condition factor K = 0.881 +/- 0.085 (mean +/- S.D.), 0.833 +/- 0.096 and 0.851 +/- 0.086, for fish spawning at salinities of c. 7, 10-18 and 30-35, respectively, with no difference between areas, i.e. analysed fish were in similar nutritional condition. A general linear model, with testes dry mass as the dependent variable and somatic mass as covariate resulted in a significant difference between areas-populations with larger testes for P. flesus spawning at a salinity of c. 7 but no difference between fish spawning at a salinity of 10-18 and 30-35. The result suggests that adaptation by increasing the number of spermatozoa produced may be a key mechanism for marine teleosts spawning in areas with low salinities to sustain the fertilization capacity as shown here for the euryhaline P. flesus.

Keywords
adaptation, flounder, population specific, salinity, sperm production, testes size
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364060 (URN)10.1111/jfb.13667 (DOI)000443231700008 ()29882275 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Nissling, A. & Larsson, R. (2018). Population specific sperm production in flounder Platichtys flesus - adaptation to salinity at spawning. Journal of Fish Biology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population specific sperm production in flounder Platichtys flesus - adaptation to salinity at spawning
2018 (English)In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351137 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-19 Created: 2018-05-19 Last updated: 2018-05-19
Nissling, A., Nyberg, S. & Petereit, C. (2017). Egg buoyancy of flounder, Platichthys flesus, in the Baltic Sea-adaptation to salinity and implications for egg survival. Fisheries Research, 191, 179-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Egg buoyancy of flounder, Platichthys flesus, in the Baltic Sea-adaptation to salinity and implications for egg survival
2017 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 191, p. 179-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vertical distribution of eggs as determined by the egg buoyancy, i.e. the difference in specific gravity between the egg and the ambient water, have profound implications for the reproductive success and hence recruitment in fish. Here variability in egg specific gravity of flounder, Platichthys flesus, was studied along a salinity gradient and by comparing two reproductive strategies, spawning pelagic or demersal eggs. Egg characteristics of 209 egg batches (covering ICES subdivisions (SD) 22-29 in the brackish water Baltic Sea) was used to reveal the significance of egg diameter and egg dry weight for egg specific gravity (ESG), subpopulations, and egg survival probabilities of pelagic eggs following a major saline water inflow event. As an adaptation to salinity, ESG (at 7 degrees C) differed (p <0.001) between areas; three subpopulations of flounder with pelagic eggs: 1.0152 +/- 0.0021 (mean +/- sd)g cm(-3) in SD 22, 1.0116 +/- 0.0013 g cm(-3) in SD 24 and 25, and 1.0096 +/- 0.0007 g cm(-3) in SD 26 and 28, contrasting to flounder with demersal eggs, 1.0161 +/- 0.0008 g cm(-3). Egg diameter differed (p <0.001) between subpopulations; from 1.08 +/- 0.06 mm (SD 22) to 1.26 +/- 0.06 mm (SD 26 and 28) for pelagic eggs and 1.02 +/- 0.04 mm for demersal eggs, whereas egg dry weight was similar; 37.9 +/- 5.0 mu g (SD 22) and 37.2 +/- 3.9 mu g (SD 28) for pelagic, and 36.5 +/- 6.5 mu g for demersal eggs. Both egg diameter and egg dry weight were identified as explanatory variables, explaining 87% of the variation in ESG. ESG changed during ontogeny; a slight decrease initially but an increase prior to hatching. Egg survival probabilities judged by combining ESG and hydrographic data suggested higher egg survival in SD 25 (26 vs 100%) and SD 26 (32 vs 99%) but not in SD 28 (0 and 3%) after the inflow event, i.e. highly fluctuating habitat suitability. The results confirm the significance of ESG for egg survival and show that variability in ESG as and adaptation to salinity is determined mainly by water content manifested as differences in egg diameter; increase in diameter with decreasing salinity for pelagic eggs, and decreased diameter resulting in demersal eggs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
Keywords
Egg specific gravity, Flounder ecotype, Brackish water, Pelagic eggs, Demersal eggs, Egg survival
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-326201 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2017.02.020 (DOI)000402357600020 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework ProgrammeSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2017-08-08Bibliographically approved
Hinrichsen, H.-H., Petereit, C., Nissling, A., Wallin, I., Ustups, D. & Florin, A.-B. (2017). Survival and dispersal variability of pelagic eggs and yolk-sac larvae of central and eastern baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus): application of biophysical models. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 74(1), 41-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survival and dispersal variability of pelagic eggs and yolk-sac larvae of central and eastern baltic flounder (Platichthys flesus): application of biophysical models
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2017 (English)In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 41-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian particle tracking technique was utilized to simulate spatially and temporally resolved long-term environmentally related (i) size of habitat suitable for reproduction, (ii) egg/yolk-sac larval survival, (iii) separation of causes of mortality, and (iv) connectivity between spawning areas of Baltic flounder with pelagiceggs. Information on reproduction habitat requirements and mortality sources were obtained from field or laboratory studies. In our modelling study we only quantified physical processes generating heterogeneity in spatial distribution of eggs and yolk-sac larvae, as e.g. predation is not accounted for. The spatial extent of eggs and larvae represented as modelled particles is primarily determined by oxygen and salinity conditions. The reproduction habitat most suitable was determined for the Gdansk Deep, followed by the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low habitat suitability was obtained for the Arkona Basin and the Gotland Basin. The model runs also showed yolk-sac larval survival to be to a large extent affected by sedimentation. Eggs initially released in the Arkona Basin and Bornholm Basin are strongly affected by sedimentation compared with those released in the Gdansk Deep and Gotland Basin. Highest relative survival of eggs occurred in the Gdansk Deep and in the Bornholm Basin. Relatively low survival rates in the Gotland Basin were attributable to oxygen-dependent mortality. Oxygen content had almost no impact on survival in the Arkona Basin. For all spawning areas mortality caused by lethally low temperatures was only evident after severe winters. Buoyancy of eggs and yolk-sac larvae in relation to topographic features appear as a barrier for the transport of eggs and yolk-sac larvae and potentially limits the connectivity of early life stages between the different spawning areas.

Keywords
connectivity, Egg buoyancy, environmental variability, Individual-Based modelling, mortality, retention vs. dispersal
National Category
Biological Sciences Fish and Aquacultural Science Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310439 (URN)10.1093/icesjms/fsw163 (DOI)000397136400005 ()
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Nissling, A., Thorsen, A. & da Silva, F. F. (2016). Fecundity regulation by atresia in turbot Scophthalmus maximus in the Baltic Sea. Journal of Fish Biology, 88(4), 1301-1320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecundity regulation by atresia in turbot Scophthalmus maximus in the Baltic Sea
2016 (English)In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 1301-1320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Down-regulation of fecundity through oocyte resorption was assessed in Baltic Sea turbot Scophthalmus maximus at three locations in the period from late vitellogenesis in April to spawning during June to July. The mean +/- s.d. total length of the sampled fish was 327 +/- 31cm and mean +/- s.d. age was 62 +/- 15years. Measurements of atresia were performed using the profile method' with the intensity of atresia adjusted according to the dissector method' (106% adjustment; coefficient of determination was 0675 between methods). Both prevalence (portion of fish with atresia) and intensity (calculated as the average proportion of atretic cells in fish displaying atresia) of atresia were low in prespawning fish, but high from onset of spawning throughout the spawning period. Atretic oocytes categorized as in early alpha and in late alpha state occurred irrespective of maturity stage from late prespawning individuals up to late spawning fish, showing that oocytes may become atretic throughout the spawning period. Observed prevalence of atresia throughout the spawning period was almost 40% with an intensity of c. 20%. This indicates extensive down-regulation, i.e. considerably lower realized (number of eggs spawned) v. potential fecundity (number of developing oocytes), suggesting significant variability in reproductive potential. The extent of fecundity regulation in relation to fish condition (Fulton's condition factor) is discussed, suggesting an association between levels of atresia and fish condition.

Keywords
determinate spawner, life-history traits, oocyte development, oocyte resorption, realized fecundity
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300316 (URN)10.1111/jfb.12879 (DOI)000374008900002 ()26928526 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hinrichsen, H.-H., Lehmann, A., Petereit, C., Nissling, A., Ustups, D., Bergström, U. & Hussy, K. (2016). Spawning areas of eastern Baltic cod revisited: Using hydrodynamic modelling to reveal spawning habitat suitability, egg survival probability, and connectivity patterns. Progress in Oceanography, 143, 13-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spawning areas of eastern Baltic cod revisited: Using hydrodynamic modelling to reveal spawning habitat suitability, egg survival probability, and connectivity patterns
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2016 (English)In: Progress in Oceanography, ISSN 0079-6611, E-ISSN 1873-4472, Vol. 143, p. 13-25Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the highly variable environment of the Baltic Sea two genetically distinct cod stocks exist, one west of the island of Bornholm, which is referred to as the western stock, and one to the east of Bornholm, the eastern stock. A hydrodynamic model combined with a Lagrangian particle tracking technique was utilised to provide spatially and temporally resolved long-term information on environmentally-related (i) spawning habitat size, (ii) egg/yolk-sac larval survival, (iii) separation of causes of mortality, and (iv) connectivity between spawning areas of eastern Baltic cod. Simulations were performed to quantify processes generating heterogeneity in spatial distribution of cod eggs and yolk sac larvae up to the first feeding stage. The spatial extent of cod eggs represented as virtual drifters is primarily determined by oxygen and salinity conditions at spawning, which define the habitat requirement to which cod's physiology is suited for egg development. The highest habitat suitability occurred in the Bornholm Basin, followed by the Gdansk Deep, while relatively low habitat suitability was obtained for the Arkona and the Gotland Basin. During drift egg and yolk sac larval survival is to a large extent affected by sedimentation. Eggs initially released in the western spawning grounds (Arkona and Bornholm Basin) were more affected by sedimentation than those released in the eastern spawning grounds (Gdansk Deep and Gotland Basin). Highest relative survival of eastern Baltic cod eggs occurred in the Bornholm Basin, with a pronounced decrease towards the Gdansk Deep and the Gotland Basin. Relatively low survival rates in the Gdansk Deep and in the Gotland Basin were attributable to oxygen-dependent mortality. Low oxygen content had almost no impact on survival in the Arkona Basin. For all spawning areas temperature dependent mortality was only evident after severe winters. Egg buoyancy in relation to topographic features like bottom sills and strong bottom slopes could appear as a barrier for the transport of Baltic cod eggs and yolk sac larvae and could potentially limit the connectivity of Baltic cod early life stages between the different basins in the western and eastern Baltic Sea. The possibility of an eastward directed transport up to the first-feeding larval stage exists only for eggs and yolk sac larvae at high buoyancy levels, suggesting that dispersal of early life stages between these spawning areas is limited.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299283 (URN)10.1016/j.pocean.2016.02.004 (DOI)000374919000002 ()
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-07-18 Created: 2016-07-18 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Nissling, A., Thorsen, A. & da Silva, F. F. . (2015). Fecundity regulation in relation to habitat utilisation of two sympatric flounder (Platichtys flesus) populations in the brackish water Baltic Sea. Journal of Sea Research, 95, 188-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecundity regulation in relation to habitat utilisation of two sympatric flounder (Platichtys flesus) populations in the brackish water Baltic Sea
2015 (English)In: Journal of Sea Research, ISSN 1385-1101, E-ISSN 1873-1414, Vol. 95, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two populations of flounder (Platichtys flesus) with different life history traits inhabit the brackish water Baltic Sea. Both types share feeding areas in coastal waters during summer-autumn but utilise different habitats for spawning in spring, namely offshore spawning with pelagic eggs and coastal spawning with demersal eggs respectively. Fecundity regulation by atresia was assessed as prevalence (portion of fish with atresia) and intensity (calculated as the average intensity of atresia in these fish) during the reproductive cycle following start of gonad development in the autumn up to spawning in spring, and evaluated in relation to fish condition (Fulton's condition factor reflecting energy reserves of the fish) and feeding incidence of the respective population. Peaking in winter (December–February), fecundity regulation was significantly higher for coastal spawning flounder than for flounder spawning offshore. For coastal spawners, the prevalence was 45–90% with an intensity of 6.4–9.3% vs. 0–25% and an intensity of 2.1–3.4% for offshore spawners during winter. Further, fecundity regulation ceased prior to spawning for offshore spawners but continued for coastal spawners. For coastal spawners, the prevalence was 12–29% and an intensity of 2.5–6.1% during spawning. The change in fish condition was strongly related to feeding incidence and differed between populations. As feeding ceased, condition of offshore spawners decreased during winter up to spawning, whereas condition of coastal spawners decreased during autumn but was maintained as feeding started again prior to spawning. Thus, habitat utilisation according to spawning strategy affects the timing of fecundity down-regulation reflecting availability of resources, namely limited food resources in deep areas and higher availability in coastal areas. Offshore spawning flounder display characteristics typical for a capital spawner with ceasing of feeding and oocyte down-regulation well before spawning, whereas coastal spawning flounder can be characterised as intermediate between a capital and income spawner with feeding prior to and during spawning along with continuous fecundity-regulation.

National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238730 (URN)10.1016/j.seares.2014.06.003 (DOI)000347762500020 ()
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Limburg, K. E., Walther, B. D., Lu, Z., Jackman, G., Mohan, J., Walther, Y., . . . Schmitt, A. K. (2015). In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia. Journal of Marine Systems, 141, 167-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 141, p. 167-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely with Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances. Further, S may be incorporated trophically whereas other elements appear to be taken up directly from water. This research suggests a potential means to identify individual fish exposure to hypoxia, over entire lifetimes. With further testing and understanding, in the future fish may be able to be used as "mobile monitors" of hypoxic conditions. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Keywords
Fish otoliths, Biogeochemical markers, Hypoxia proxies
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244498 (URN)10.1016/j.jmarsys.2014.02.014 (DOI)000347868800016 ()
Available from: 2015-02-18 Created: 2015-02-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Nissling, A., Florin, A.-B., Thorsen, A. & Bergström, U. (2013). Egg production of turbot, Scophthalmus maximus, in the Baltic Sea. Journal of Sea Research, 84, 77-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Egg production of turbot, Scophthalmus maximus, in the Baltic Sea
2013 (English)In: Journal of Sea Research, ISSN 1385-1101, E-ISSN 1873-1414, Vol. 84, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the brackish water Baltic Sea turbot spawn at ~6–9 psu along the coast and on offshore banks in ICES SD 2324–29, with salinity influencing the reproductive success. The potential fecundity (the stock of vitellogenic 24oocytes in the pre-spawning ovary), egg size (diameter and dry weight of artificially fertilized 1-day-old 25eggs) and gonad dry weight were assessed for fish sampled in SD 25 and SD 28. Multiple regression analysis 26identified somatic weight, or total length in combination with Fulton's condition factor, as main predictors of 27fecundity and gonad dry weight with stage of maturity (oocyte packing density or leading cohort) as an ad- 28ditional predictor. For egg size, somatic weight was identified as main predictor while otolith weight (proxy 29for age) was an additional predictor. Univariate analysis using GLM revealed significantly higher fecundity 30and gonad dry weight for turbot from SD 28 (3378–3474 oocytes/g somatic weight) compared to those 31from SD 25 (2343 oocytes/g somatic weight), with no difference in egg size (1.05±0.03 mm diameter and 3246.8±6.5 μg dry weight; mean±sd). The difference in egg production matched egg survival probabilities 33in relation to salinity conditions suggesting selection for higher fecundity as a consequence of poorer repro- 34ductive success at lower salinities. This supports the hypothesis of higher size-specific fecundity towards the 35limit of the distribution of a species as an adaptation to harsher environmental conditions and lower offspring 36survival probabilities. Within SD 28 comparisons were made between two major fishing areas targeting 37spawning aggregations and a marine protected area without fishing. The outcome was inconclusive and is 38discussed with respect to potential fishery induced effects, effects of the salinity gradient, effects of specific 39year-classes, and effects of maturation status of sampled fish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Reproductive potential Fecundity Egg size Salinity gradient Spawning fishery Life-history traits
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology (HGO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hgo:diva-1600 (URN)10.1016/j.seares.2012.07.009 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-12 Created: 2012-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07
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