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Martinsson-Wallin, HeleneORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5343-3780
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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Berenguer, P., Clavero, C., Saldarriaga-Córdoba, M., Rivera-Hutinel, A., Seelenfreund, D., Martinsson-Wallin, H., . . . Seelenfreund, A. (2024). Identification of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and South American crops introduced during early settlement of Rapa Nui (Easter Island), as revealed through starch analysis. PLOS ONE, 19(3), Article ID e0298896.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and South American crops introduced during early settlement of Rapa Nui (Easter Island), as revealed through starch analysis
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2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 3, article id e0298896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Starch residue analysis was carried out on stone tools recovered from the bottom layer of the Anakena site on Rapa Nui (Easter Island). These deposits have been dated to AD 1000–1300 AD and so far, represent the earliest evidence of human settlement on this island. Twenty obsidian tools were analyzed. Analysis of 46 starch grains recovered from 20 obsidian tools from the earliest dated level of the Anakena site on Rapa Nui provides direct evidence for translocation of traditional crop plants at initial stages of the colonization of this island. The analysis of starch grains was based mainly on statistical methods for species identification but was complemented by visual inspection in some cases. Our results identify taxons previously unknown to have been cultivated on the island, such as breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), Zingiber officinale (ginger), and starch grains of the Spondias dulcis and Inocarpus fagifer tropical trees. Additionally, starch grains of Colocasia esculenta (taro) and Dioscorea sp. (yam), both common species in Pacific agriculture, were identified. Furthermore, the presence of four American taxa Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato), Canna sp. (achira), Manihot esculenta (manioc), and Xanthosoma sp., was detected. The occurrence of Canna sp., M. esculenta, and Xanthosoma sp. starch grains suggests the translocation of previously not described South American cultivars into the Pacific. The detection of I. batatas from this site in Rapa Nui constitutes the earliest record of this cultigen in the Pacific. Our study provides direct evidence for translocation of a set of traditional Polynesian and South American crop plants at the initial stages of colonization in Rapa Nui.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2024
National Category
Archaeology Biological Systematics Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-531372 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0298896 (DOI)001190771400054 ()38507346 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-06-13 Created: 2024-06-13 Last updated: 2024-06-13Bibliographically approved
Wallin, P. & Martinsson-Wallin, H. (2022). Anakena Re-visited: New Perspectives on Old Problems at Anakena, Rapa Nui (1ed.). In: Valenti Rull and Christopher Stevenson (Ed.), The Prehistory of Rapa Nui (Easter Island): Towards an Integrative Interdisciplinary Framework (pp. 109-137). Springer Nature
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anakena Re-visited: New Perspectives on Old Problems at Anakena, Rapa Nui
2022 (English)In: The Prehistory of Rapa Nui (Easter Island): Towards an Integrative Interdisciplinary Framework / [ed] Valenti Rull and Christopher Stevenson, Springer Nature, 2022, 1, p. 109-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is now over 30 years since we participated in the large-scale archaeological excavations at Anakena (Fig. 6.1). The results of the excavations are published in the Kon-Tiki Museum Occasional Papers (Skjølsvold 1994). The accumulated results from archaeological research on Rapa Nui subsequent to our initial excavations at Anakena justify a re-assessment of the remains and the chronological aspects at this site. New radiocarbon-dated samples have been added to the analysis and discussion of Rapa Nui prehistory, and old samples have been re-analyzed several times (see, for example, Martinsson-Wallin et al. 2013; Martinsson-Wallin and Crockford 2002; Wallin et al. 2010; Wilmshurst et al. 2011).In this respect, we suggest that it is important to re-analyze the activity and settlement sites and monuments at Anakena and their importance for ritual activities from the time of initial colonization onward. The aim of this paper is to provide new explanations and interpretations of the formation processes of the Anakena site with special attention to the activity area we named Nau Nau East (Fig. 6.2). Featuresobserved in this activity area included a small standing stone image upright that was crudely carved, hearths, refusal pits, postholes, grinding activities and a stone line demarcation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022 Edition: 1
Series
Developments in Paleoenvironmental Research, ISSN 1571-5299, E-ISSN 2215-1672 ; 22
Keywords
Archaeology, Rapa Nui, Easter Island, Anakena, Monument, Statue, Settlement
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-483547 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-91127-0_6 (DOI)978-3-030-91126-3 (ISBN)978-3-030-91127-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-08-30 Created: 2022-08-30 Last updated: 2023-11-16Bibliographically approved
Martinsson-Wallin, H. (2022). Warfare in Rapa Nui (Easter Island). In: Geoffrey Clark, Mirani Litster (Ed.), Archaeological Perspectives on Conflict and Warfare in Australia and the Pacific: (pp. 69-87). Canberra: Australian National University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Warfare in Rapa Nui (Easter Island)
2022 (English)In: Archaeological Perspectives on Conflict and Warfare in Australia and the Pacific / [ed] Geoffrey Clark, Mirani Litster, Canberra: Australian National University Press, 2022, p. 69-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Evidence of massacre, trauma on human skeletal remains, finds of used weapons, depictions of fighting on rock carvings and pottery, destruction of monuments, built defensive structures such as earth forts, and descriptions of warfare and violence in oral traditions point to the existence of organised warfare in pre-text societies. The aim of this chapter is to review and discuss the evidence of warfare and violence in pre- and protohistoric Rapa Nui (Easter Island) using data from oral traditions, the analysis of material culture, and information from human skeletal remains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canberra: Australian National University Press, 2022
Series
Terra Australis ; 54
Keywords
Warfare, Rapa Nui, Easter Island, Pacific Archaeology
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-489456 (URN)9781760464882 (ISBN)9781760464899 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-11-30 Created: 2022-11-30 Last updated: 2022-12-02Bibliographically approved
Poort, M. E., Persson-Fischier, U., Martinsson-Wallin, H., Elf Donaldson, E. & Schaub, M. (2021). “Authenticity” as a Pathway to Sustainable Cultural Tourism?: The Cases of Gotland and Rapa Nui. Sustainability, 13(11), Article ID 6302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Authenticity” as a Pathway to Sustainable Cultural Tourism?: The Cases of Gotland and Rapa Nui
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2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 6302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, two World Heritage island destinations are compared, Gotland in the Baltic and Rapa Nui in the Pacific. Both islands deal with a growing number of tourists, which asks for rethinking of tourism development. As cultural heritage plays a major role in tourism for both destinations, it is especially important to look into sustainable cultural tourism development from the perspective of authenticity. The paper is based on a variety of materials and takes an innovative approach to methods through a student–staff collaboration. The data show that social acceptance of tourism by local communities on both islands could be achieved through the creation of authentic experiences. Furthermore, data show that it is rather potent to engage both locals and tourists in modernized authentic experiences. However, this can only be done if locals are empowered and are genuinely allowed to steer the development of tourism. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
authenticity, sustainable tourism, liquid modernity, Gotland, Rapa Nui
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-443960 (URN)10.3390/su13116302 (DOI)000660767400001 ()
Funder
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)
Available from: 2021-06-03 Created: 2021-06-03 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Poort, M., Persson-Fischier, U., Martinsson-Wallin, H., Gansauer, F., Demuro, C., Van der Zee, A., . . . Liu, S. (2021). More or less?: A conjunctural analysis of differing views on the development of cruise tourism. Studia Periegetica, 36(4), 49-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>More or less?: A conjunctural analysis of differing views on the development of cruise tourism
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2021 (English)In: Studia Periegetica, ISSN 1897-9262, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 49-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is based on a qualitative study regarding two World Heritage Island destinations, Gotland in the Baltic Sea and Rapa Nui in the Pacific Ocean. The two islands are used as cases illustrating different views on the development of cruise tourism. By applying conjunctural analysis the authors are able to account for the broader context of cruise tourism. Different perspectives on cruise tourism are found to be embedded in both local and global contexts, which are associated with three kinds of challenges: cruise tourism is developing without the local community’s involvement in decision making, it is not aligned with the aims of local tourism and ignores local products and services. We therefore call for more involvement of the local community in the development of cruise tourism.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-472483 (URN)10.5604/01.3001.0015.8058 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-04-12 Created: 2022-04-12 Last updated: 2022-08-31Bibliographically approved
Martinsson-Wallin, H. (2021). [Review of:] Debating Lapita: Distribution, Chronology, Society and Subsistence / edited by Stuart Bedford and Matthew Spriggs, 2019 [Review]. AUSTRALIAN ARCHAEOLOGY, 87(1), 109-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>[Review of:] Debating Lapita: Distribution, Chronology, Society and Subsistence / edited by Stuart Bedford and Matthew Spriggs, 2019
2021 (English)In: AUSTRALIAN ARCHAEOLOGY, ISSN 0312-2417, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 109-110Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2021
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-454648 (URN)10.1080/03122417.2020.1837053 (DOI)000591009000001 ()
Available from: 2021-09-29 Created: 2021-09-29 Last updated: 2021-09-29Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, N. A., Barliaev, A., Martinsson-Wallin, H., Risberg, J., Hattestrand, M., Croudace, I., . . . Yokoyama, Y. (2020). Landscape development at Lina myr fen, Eastern Gotland, 9000-2500 cal. yr BP. The Holocene, 30(8), 1205-1219, Article ID 0959683620913919.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Landscape development at Lina myr fen, Eastern Gotland, 9000-2500 cal. yr BP
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2020 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1205-1219, article id 0959683620913919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using diatoms, pollen, and geochemistry, we explore human habitation around Lina myr, Gotland, in relation to shore displacement. Archeological evidence has shown that Lina myr was an important area for its prehistoric human inhabitants. We investigate if and when Lina myr was connected to the sea and could therefore have been part of an inland water system useful for transport. A chronology was based on C-14 AMS dating of terrestrial macrofossils and bulk sediments with dates ranging between 9100 and 2360 cal. yr BP. The initiation of the Littorina transgression was dated to 8500 cal. yr BP. A twofold pattern for the maximum sub-phase of the Littorina Sea is suggested from 8100 to 7500 cal. yr BP and from 6500 to 6000 cal. yr BP. The onset of cultivation and grazing was indicated by the presence of Hordeum and Plantago lanceolata in the pollen record during the Late Neolithic, at about 4580 cal. yr BP. During this time sea level was relatively higher than today and the Lina myr basin was connected with the Littorina Sea, which it continued to be until isostatic uplift caused it to become isolated at about 3820 cal. yr BP. After about 3000 cal. yr BP, human-made landscape changes intensified, grasslands increased, and shrublands decreased.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications, 2020
Keywords
archeology, Baltic Sea, diatoms, Gotland, human impacts, Littorina transgression, pollen, shore displacement
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-422473 (URN)10.1177/0959683620913919 (DOI)000527986000001 ()
Available from: 2020-10-14 Created: 2020-10-14 Last updated: 2020-10-14Bibliographically approved
Wallin, P. & Martinsson-Wallin, H. (2018). Gothemshammar - a Late Bronze Age coastal rampart on Gotland. Fornvännen, 113(2), 65-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gothemshammar - a Late Bronze Age coastal rampart on Gotland
2018 (English)In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports the results of a project aiming to use survey and excavation of the Gothemshammar rampart in a digital reconstruction to understand the site in its original landscape setting. Excavations uncovered internal construction details and dateable materials from domestic animals and charcoal. Fifteen AMS dates indicate that the rampart was built and used in the Late Bronze Age, c. 950-700 cal AD.

Its northern end is situated at a steep scarp towards the current sea shore, and the southern end is in an open slightly sloping terrain, currently about a kilometre from the sea. LiDAR data and an up-to-date shoreline displacement model indicate that the seashore was about so m higher when the rampart was built and used than it is today. The landscape reconstruction shows that the rampart originally cut off a headland on an islet that was strategically located at the mouth of an inland water system.

To further understand the site's Bronze Age context we made a spatial analysis of features tied to the same time frame, including other monumental structures (stone ships, burial cairns, other ramparts/enclosures) and metalwork hoards. It became evident that all kinds of monuments were mainly located close to the sea shore on capes and islets. We could also see that the monuments, especially the stone ships, were mostly on the north shore of the ancient waterway and that its entry/exit where Gothemshammar is situated served as an important control point for travel into Gotland as well as overseas.

National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368062 (URN)000445977700001 ()
Funder
Berit Wallenberg FoundationBirgit och Gad Rausings stiftelse för Humanistisk Forskning
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2021-02-10Bibliographically approved
Martinsson-Wallin, H. & Wehlin, J. (2017). Stones in the South: Decoding Bronze Age Ritual Practices on Gotland. Current Swedish Archaeology, 25, 227-256
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stones in the South: Decoding Bronze Age Ritual Practices on Gotland
2017 (English)In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 227-256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we discuss the ritual practices and ritualization in the Bronze Age society on Gotland based on archaeological investigations of cairn milieus and stone ship contexts. We explore whether erected stones and demarcations on the south to south-west side of the Bronze Age cairns are the norm and whether this phenomenon occurred during the Bronze Age. We also discuss whether our archaeological research can support long-term use of cairn milieus for ritual purposes.

Keywords
Gotland, Bronze Age, monument, cairn, ship setting, south stones
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371255 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Anderson, A., Stothert, K., Martinsson-Wallin, H., Wallin, P., Flett, I., Haberle, S., . . . Rhodes, E. (2016). Reconsidering Precolumbian Human Colonization In The Galapagos Islands, Republic Of Ecuador. Latin American antiquity, 27(2), 169-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconsidering Precolumbian Human Colonization In The Galapagos Islands, Republic Of Ecuador
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2016 (English)In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 169-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fifty years ago, Heyerdahl and Skjolsvold (1956, 1990) collected material from five archaeological sites in the Galapagos Islands. They retained earthenwares of possible precolumbian origin and discarded ceramic, metal, and glass artifacts postdating the arrival of the Spanish in A.D. 1535. Consequently, they argued that each site was formed as the results of a series of discard events from unrelated short-term occupations extending from the precolumbian to the historical era, and that the earthenwares represented occasional visits by fishermen from precolumbian Peru and Ecuador. In 2005, we re -excavated the sites and collected all the excavated materials. Our results show that each class of material, irrespective of age or origin, was distributed spatially and stratigraphically in the same pattern, contradicting the former assumption of multiple, unrelated occupations. We reject the palimpsest model in favor of the null hypothesis of single-phase site occupation. Analysis of putatively precolumbian pottery using optically-stimulated luminescence dating indicates that it is mostly of historical age. Radiocarbon dating confirms that the archaeological sites are younger than the sixteenth century. Research on sedimentary cores shows probable anthropogenic impacts as restricted to the last 500 years. We conclude that there was no human occupation in the Galapagos Islands until the historical era.

National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299909 (URN)10.7183/1045-6635.27.2.169 (DOI)000378578800003 ()
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Projects
Interdiciplinary Island and Sescape Reserach Cluster
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5343-3780

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