uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 118) Show all publications
Oroujeni, M., Kaboudin, B., Xia, W., Jönsson, P. & Ossipov, D. A. (2018). Conjugation of cyclodextrin to magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles via polydopamine coating for drug delivery. Progress in organic coatings, 114, 154-161.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugation of cyclodextrin to magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles via polydopamine coating for drug delivery
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 114, 154-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330899 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2017-11-16Bibliographically approved
Garbani, M., Xia, W., Rhyner, C., Prati, M., Scheynius, A., Malissen, B., . . . Terhorst-Molawi, D. (2017). Allergen-loaded strontium-doped hydroxyapatite spheres improve allergen-specific immunotherapy in mice. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 72(4), 570-578.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allergen-loaded strontium-doped hydroxyapatite spheres improve allergen-specific immunotherapy in mice
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 72, no 4, 570-578 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Immunomodulatory interventions play a key role in the treatment of infections and cancer as well as allergic diseases. Adjuvants such as micro- and nanoparticles are often added to immunomodulatory therapies to enhance the triggered immune response. Here, we report the immunological assessment of novel and economically manufactured microparticle adjuvants, namely strontium-doped hydroxyapatite porous spheres (SHAS), which we suggest for the use as adjuvant and carrier in allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT).

Methods and Results

Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the synthesis procedure developed for the production of SHAS results in a highly homogeneous population of spheres. SHAS bound and released proteins such as ovalbumin (OVA) or the major cat allergen Fel d 1. SHAS-OVA were taken up by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs) and murine DCs and did not have any necrotic or apoptotic effects even at high densities. In a murine model of ASIT for allergic asthmatic inflammation we found that OVA released from subcutaneously injected SHAS-OVA led to a sustained stimulation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. ASIT with SHAS-OVA as compared to soluble OVA resulted in similar humoral responses but in a higher efficacy as assessed by symptom scoring.

Conclusion

We conclude that SHAS may constitute a suitable carrier and adjuvant for ASIT with great potential due to its unique protein-binding properties.

National Category
Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310479 (URN)10.1111/all.13041 (DOI)000397489400007 ()27590538 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5419
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved
Ting, M., Jefferies, S. R., Xia, W., Engqvist, H. & Suzuki, J. B. (2017). Classification and Effects of Implant Surface Modification on the Bone: Human Cell-Based In Vitro Studies. Journal of Oral Implantology, 43(1), 58-83.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification and Effects of Implant Surface Modification on the Bone: Human Cell-Based In Vitro Studies
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Oral Implantology, ISSN 0160-6972, E-ISSN 1548-1336, Vol. 43, no 1, 58-83 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Implant surfaces are continuously being improved to achieve faster osseointegration and a stronger bone to implant interface. This review will present the various implant surfaces, the parameters for implant surface characterization, and the corresponding in vitro human cell-based studies determining the strength and quality of the bone-implant contact. These in vitro cell-based studies are the basis for animal and clinical studies and are the prelude to further reviews on how these surfaces would perform when subjected to the oral environment and functional loading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ALLEN PRESS INC, 2017
Keyword
titanium, dental implant, implant surface morphology, osseointegration, surface topography
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320997 (URN)10.1563/aaid-joi-D-16-00079 (DOI)000395366200011 ()27897464 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
Li, H., Edin, F., Hayashi, H., Gudjonsson, O., Danckwardt-Lillieström, N., Engqvist, H., . . . Xia, W. (2017). Guided Growth of Auditory Neurons: Bioactive Particles Towards Gapless Neural - Electrode Interface. Biomaterials, 122, 1-9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guided Growth of Auditory Neurons: Bioactive Particles Towards Gapless Neural - Electrode Interface
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 122, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cochlear implant (CI) is a successful device to restore hearing. Despite continuous development, frequency discrimination is poor in CI users due to an anatomical gap between the auditory neurons and CI electrode causing current spread and unspecific neural stimulation. One strategy to close this anatomical gap is guiding the growth of neuron dendrites closer to CI electrodes through targeted slow release of neurotrophins. Biodegradable calcium phosphate hollow nanospheres (CPHSs) were produced and their capacity for uptake and release of neurotrophins investigated using I-125-conjugated glia cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). The CPHSs were coated onto CI electrodes and loaded with neurotrophins. Axon guidance effect of slow-released neurotrophins from the CPHSs was studied in an in vitro 3D culture model. CPHS coating bound and released GDNF with an association rate constant 6.3 x 10(3) M(-1)s(-1) and dissociation rate 2.6 x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Neurites from human vestibulocochlear ganglion explants found and established physical contact with the GDNF-loaded CPHS coating on the CI electrodes placed 0.7 mm away. Our results suggest that neurotrophin delivery through CPHS coating is a plausible way to close the anatomical gap between auditory neurons and electrodes. By overcoming this gap, selective neural activation and the fine hearing for CI users become possible.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276334 (URN)10.1016/j.biomaterials.2016.12.020 (DOI)000394472500001 ()28107660 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5419
Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-02-11 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
Yang, X., Xu, S., Chen, X., He, D., Ke, X., Zhang, L., . . . Gou, Z. (2017). Intra-bone marrow injection of trace elements co-doped calcium phosphate microparticles for the treatment of osteoporotic rat. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, 105(5), 1422-1432.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra-bone marrow injection of trace elements co-doped calcium phosphate microparticles for the treatment of osteoporotic rat
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 105, no 5, 1422-1432 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Osteoporotic femur fractures are the most common fragility fracture and account for approximately one million injuries per year. Local intervention by intra-marrow injection is potentially a good choice for preventing osteoporotic bone loss when the osteoporotic femoral fracture was treated. Previously, it was shown that trace element co-doped calcium phosphate (teCaP) implants could stimulate osteoporotic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell activity in vitro and bone regeneration in femoral bone defects in osteoporotic animal models. They hypothesized that local intra-marrow injection of teCaP particles could improve bone function because the teCaP can sustain release of biologically essential inorganic minerals and improve bone remodeling in osteoporosis. The teCaP and CaP particles were synthesized in simulated body fluid with and without adding silicon, zinc and strontium ions. Female rats (8 months) were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated, and then intervened in the femoral marrow space at 12 months old. Groups include: (1) saline water; (2) CaP particles; and (3) teCaP particles. After 2-3 months of intervention, the sham groups showed higher bone mineral density (MBD) in the femur, and teCaP group increased the BMD in the OVX groups. The compressive strength of the OVX-teCaP group was significantly higher than that in the OVX-CaP group. Significant differences between OVX-teCaP and OVX-CaP groups were found for bone mineral microarchitecture, bone mineral density, and trace mineral content, but not for feces composition. These results confirm the teCaP particles could suppress osteoporotic bone loss by local intramarrow injection. Therefore, this biomaterial could be used as a next-generation combination treatment for osteoporotic trauma and osteoporosis itself.

Keyword
antiosteoporosis, trace element, calcium phosphate, local intramarrow injection, osteoporotic fracture
National Category
Biomaterials Science Materials Engineering Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321173 (URN)10.1002/jbm.a.36027 (DOI)000398211300019 ()28233417 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-12 Last updated: 2017-05-12Bibliographically approved
Ingrassia, D., Sladkova, M., Pujari-Palmer, M., Xia, W., Engqvist, H. & de Peppo, G. M. (2017). Stem cell-mediated functionalization of titanium implants. Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, 28(9), Article ID 133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stem cell-mediated functionalization of titanium implants
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, E-ISSN 1573-4838, Vol. 28, no 9, 133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prosthetic implants are used daily to treat edentulous people and to restore mobility in patients affected by skeletal defects. Titanium (Ti) is the material of choice in prosthetics, because it can form a stable bond with the surrounding bone following implantation-a process known as osseointegration. Yet, full integration of prosthetic implants takes time, and fails in clinical situations characterized by limited bone quantity and/or compromised regenerative capacity, and in at-risk patients. Intense research efforts are thus made to develop new implants that are cost-effective, safe, and suited to every patient in each clinical situation. In this study, we tested the possibility to functionalize Ti implants using stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitor (iPSC-MP) cells were cultured on Ti model disks for 2 weeks in osteogenic conditions. Samples were then treated using four different decellularization methods to wash off the cells and expose the matrix. The functionalized disks were finally sterilized and seeded with fresh human iPSC-MP cells to study the effect of stem cell-mediated surface functionalization on cell behavior. The results show that different decellularization methods produce diverse surface modifications, and that these modifications promote proliferation of human iPSC-MP cells, affect the expression of genes involved in development and differentiation, and stimulate the release of alkaline phosphatase. Cell-mediated functionalization represents an attractive strategy to modify the surface of prosthetic implants with cues of biological relevance, and opens unprecedented possibilities for development of new devices with enhanced therapeutic potential.

National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333953 (URN)10.1007/s10856-017-5944-1 (DOI)000407947900004 ()28744615 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Xia, W., Qin, T., Suska, F. & Engqvist, H. (2016). Bioactive spheres: the way of treating dentin hypersensitivity. ACS biomaterials science and engineering, 2(5), 734-740.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioactive spheres: the way of treating dentin hypersensitivity
2016 (English)In: ACS biomaterials science and engineering, ISSN 2373-9878, Vol. 2, no 5, 734-740 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sealing exposed dental tubules is the most effective and long-term way to relieve the pain induced by dental sensitivity. A bioactive hollow sphere (strontium substituted calcium phosphate) was synthesized and added in toothpaste to study its effect on dental hypersensitivity via tooth tubules occlusion and mineralization. The size of spheres is perfect for penetrating into dental tubules, reaching to 20 pm into the tubules. The exposed dental tubules were occluded by spheres and new apatite layer after 3 days brushing. The spheres attached to the surface of dentin and the mineralized surface contained two layers, a porous layer followed by a dense apatite layer. The porous layer can be dissolved in an acidic solution, but the following dense layer could be kept even after soaking in an acid solution. In conclusion, Sr-substituted calcium phosphate spheres could be a good candidate for at-home treatment of dental hypersensitivity.

Keyword
calcium phosphate, spheres, occlusion, mineralization, dental sensitivity
National Category
Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284233 (URN)10.1021/acsbiomaterials.5b00499 (DOI)000375893600004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5419
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved
Vallhov, H., Xia, W., Engqvist, H. & Scheynius, A. (2016). Bioceramic microneedles in allergen-specific immunotherapy. In: : . Paper presented at 11th World Immune Regulation Meeting. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioceramic microneedles in allergen-specific immunotherapy
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284210 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
11th World Immune Regulation Meeting
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-01-19
Xia, W., Chang, J. & Engqvist, H. (2016). Biological Effect of Ions in CalciumPhosphates on Bone Regeneration. In: Design of Bioactive Materials for Bone Repair and Regeneration: . World Scientific.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological Effect of Ions in CalciumPhosphates on Bone Regeneration
2016 (English)In: Design of Bioactive Materials for Bone Repair and Regeneration, World Scientific, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2016
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284117 (URN)978-981-4667-65-4 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-01-19
Cai, Y., Li, H., Karlsson, M., Leifer, K., Engqvist, H. & Xia, W. (2016). Biomineralization on Single Crystalline Rutile: The Modulated Growth of Hydroxyapatite by Fibronectin in a Simulated Body Fluid. RSC Advances, 6, 35507-35516.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomineralization on Single Crystalline Rutile: The Modulated Growth of Hydroxyapatite by Fibronectin in a Simulated Body Fluid
Show others...
2016 (English)In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, 35507-35516 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to probe the complex interaction between surface bioactivity and protein adsorption on single crystalline rutile. Our previous studies have shown that single crystalline rutile possessed in vitro bioactivity and the crystalline faces affected the hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. However, upon implantation, a fast adsorption of proteins, from the biological fluids, is intermediated by a water layer towards the biomaterial interface. Thus the effect of protein on the bioactivity must be addressed. In this study, the HA growth dynamics on (001), (100) and (110) faces was investigated in a simulated body fluid with the presence of fibronectin (FN) by two different processes. The surface adhesion of each face before and after FN adsorption, as revealed by direct numerical values, was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based peak force quantitative nanomechanical mapping (PF-QNM) for the first time. The findings suggest the surface energies of FN pre-adsorbed (001), (100) and (110) faces have been enhanced, leading to the subsequent accelerated HA formation. Furthermore, (001) and (100) faces were found to have larger coverage of HA crystals than (110) face at an early stage. In addition, various characterizations were performed to probe the chemical and crystal structures of as-grown biomimetic HA crystals, and in particular, the Ca/P ratio variations at different soaking time points.

National Category
Engineering and Technology Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-277120 (URN)10.1039/C6RA04303H (DOI)000374349600042 ()
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7356-3002

Search in DiVA

Show all publications