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Andreasson, Jakob
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Daurer, B. J., Okamoto, K., Bielecki, J., Maia, F. R. .., Mühlig, K., Seibert, M. M., . . . Larsson, D. S. D. (2017). Experimental strategies for imaging bioparticles with femtosecond hard X-ray pulses. IUCrJ, 4(3), 251-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental strategies for imaging bioparticles with femtosecond hard X-ray pulses
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2017 (English)In: IUCrJ, ISSN 0972-6918, E-ISSN 2052-2525, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 251-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the capabilities of the Coherent X-ray Imaging Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source to image small biological samples. The weak signal from small samples puts a significant demand on the experiment. Aerosolized Omono River virus particles of similar to 40 nm in diameter were injected into the submicrometre X-ray focus at a reduced pressure. Diffraction patterns were recorded on two area detectors. The statistical nature of the measurements from many individual particles provided information about the intensity profile of the X-ray beam, phase variations in the wavefront and the size distribution of the injected particles. The results point to a wider than expected size distribution (from similar to 35 to similar to 300 nm in diameter). This is likely to be owing to nonvolatile contaminants from larger droplets during aerosolization and droplet evaporation. The results suggest that the concentration of nonvolatile contaminants and the ratio between the volumes of the initial droplet and the sample particles is critical in such studies. The maximum beam intensity in the focus was found to be 1.9 * 10(12) photons per mu m(2) per pulse. The full-width of the focus at half-maximum was estimated to be 500 nm (assuming 20% beamline transmission), and this width is larger than expected. Under these conditions, the diffraction signal from a sample-sized particle remained above the average background to a resolution of 4.25 nm. The results suggest that reducing the size of the initial droplets during aerosolization is necessary to bring small particles into the scope of detailed structural studies with X-ray lasers.

Keyword
X-ray diffraction, free-electron laser, flash X-ray imaging, diffraction before destruction, virus, Omono River virus, OmRV
National Category
Chemical Sciences Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323439 (URN)10.1107/S2052252517003591 (DOI)000400460500008 ()28512572 (PubMedID)
Projects
eSSENCE
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-01-02Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, H. O., Caleman, C., Andreasson, J. & Timneanu, N. (2017). Hit detection in serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray spectroscopy of plasma emission. IUCrJ, 4(6), 778-784
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hit detection in serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray spectroscopy of plasma emission
2017 (English)In: IUCrJ, ISSN 0972-6918, E-ISSN 2052-2525, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 778-784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging and promising method for determining protein structures, making use of the ultrafast and bright X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers. The upcoming X-ray laser sources will produce well above 1000pulses per second and will pose a new challenge: how to quickly determine successful crystal hits and avoid a high-rate data deluge. Proposed here is a hit-finding scheme based on detecting photons from plasma emission after the sample has been intercepted by the X-ray laser. Plasma emission spectra are simulated for systems exposed to high-intensity femtosecond pulses, for both protein crystals and the liquid carrier systems that are used for sample delivery. The thermal radiation from the glowing plasma gives a strong background in the XUV region that depends on the intensity of the pulse, around the emission lines from light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen). Sample hits can be reliably distinguished from the carrier liquid based on the characteristic emission lines from heavier elements present only in the sample, such as sulfur. For buffer systems with sulfur present, selenomethionine substitution is suggested, where the selenium emission lines could be used both as an indication of a hit and as an aid in phasing and structural reconstruction of the protein.

Keyword
hit detection, plasma emission spectra, serial femtosecond crystallography, protein structure
National Category
Biophysics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331934 (URN)10.1107/S2052252517014154 (DOI)000414266200011 ()29123680 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), 2016-7-61Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)ÅForsk (Ångpanneföreningen's Foundation for Research and Development)
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved
Espinoza, S., Neuber, G., Brooks, C. D., Besner, B., Hashemi, M., Ruebhausen, M. & Andreasson, J. (2017). User oriented end-station on VUV pump-probe magneto-optical ellipsometry at ELI beamlines. Applied Surface Science, 421(Part B), 378-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User oriented end-station on VUV pump-probe magneto-optical ellipsometry at ELI beamlines
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2017 (English)In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 421, no Part B, p. 378-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A state of the art ellipsometer for user operations is being implemented at ELI Beamlines in Prague, Czech Republic. It combines three of the most promising and exotic forms of ellipsometry: VUV, pump-probe and magneto-optical ellipsometry. This new ellipsometer covers a spectral operational range from the NIR up to the VUV, with high through-put between 1 and 40 eV. The ellipsometer also allows measurements of magneto-optical spectra with a 1 kHz switchable magnetic field of up to 1.5 T across the sample combining ellipsometry and Kerr spectroscopy measurements in an unprecedented spectral range. This form of generalized ellipsometry enables users to address diagonal and off-diagonal components of the dielectric tensor within one measurement. Pump-probe measurements enable users to study the dynamic behaviour of the dielectric tensor in order to resolve the time-domain phenomena in the femto to 100 ns range.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335118 (URN)10.1016/j.apsusc.2017.02.005 (DOI)000408756700019 ()
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hantke, M. F., Hasse, D., Ekeberg, T., John, K., Svenda, M., Loh, D., . . . Maia, F. R. .. (2016). A data set from flash X-ray imaging of carboxysomes. Scientific Data, 3, Article ID 160061.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A data set from flash X-ray imaging of carboxysomes
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id 160061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ultra-intense femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray lasers permit structural studies on single particles and biomolecules without crystals. We present a large data set on inherently heterogeneous, polyhedral carboxysome particles. Carboxysomes are cell organelles that vary in size and facilitate up to 40% of Earth’s carbon fixation by cyanobacteria and certain proteobacteria. Variation in size hinders crystallization. Carboxysomes appear icosahedral in the electron microscope. A protein shell encapsulates a large number of Rubisco molecules in paracrystalline arrays inside the organelle. We used carboxysomes with a mean diameter of 115±26 nm from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus. A new aerosol sample-injector allowed us to record 70,000 low-noise diffraction patterns in 12 min. Every diffraction pattern is a unique structure measurement and high-throughput imaging allows sampling the space of structural variability. The different structures can be separated and phased directly from the diffraction data and open a way for accurate, high-throughput studies on structures and structural heterogeneity in biology and elsewhere.

National Category
Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300202 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2016.61 (DOI)000390225400006 ()
Note

Data Descriptor

Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Krikunova, M., Timneanu, N. & Andreasson, J. (2016). Atomic and molecular systems under intense X-ray radiation (86ed.). In: Ultrafast Dynamics Driven by Intense Light Pulses: From Atoms to Solids, from Lasers to Intense X-rays (pp. 319-339). Switzerland: Springer, 86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atomic and molecular systems under intense X-ray radiation
2016 (English)In: Ultrafast Dynamics Driven by Intense Light Pulses: From Atoms to Solids, from Lasers to Intense X-rays, Switzerland: Springer, 2016, 86, Vol. 86, p. 319-339Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The review covers recent progress in the development of X-ray pulse metrology essential for experiments at Free Electron Lasers. The scientific section is focused on time-resolved studies of ionization dynamics of atoms, molecules and (bio-)nanoparticles. We discuss the role of ionization dynamics for high resolution imaging of bio-and bio-like nanoparticles and illustrate the potential for multidirectional imaging of unique non-reproducible samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Switzerland: Springer, 2016 Edition: 86
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283182 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-20173-3_13 (DOI)000376972300014 ()2-s2.0-84955646910 (Scopus ID)9783319201733; 9783319201726 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2016-09-01
Munke, A., Andreasson, J., Aquila, A., Awel, S., Ayyer, K., Barty, A., . . . Zook, J. (2016). Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Scientific Data, 3, 160064:1-12, Article ID 160064.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, p. 160064:1-12, article id 160064Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300203 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2016.64 (DOI)000390225700001 ()
Projects
eSSENCE
Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
van der Schot, G., Svenda, M., Maia, F. R. .., Hantke, M. F., DePonte, D. P., Seibert, M. M., . . . Ekeberg, T. (2016). Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser. Scientific Data, 3, Article ID 160058.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id 160058Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Structural studies on living cells by conventional methods are limited to low resolution because radiation damage kills cells long before the necessary dose for high resolution can be delivered. X-ray free-electron lasers circumvent this problem by outrunning key damage processes with an ultra-short and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse. Diffraction-before-destruction experiments provide high-resolution data from cells that are alive when the femtosecond X-ray pulse traverses the sample. This paper presents two data sets from micron-sized cyanobacteria obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, containing a total of 199,000 diffraction patterns. Utilizing this type of diffraction data will require the development of new analysis methods and algorithms for studying structure and structural variability in large populations of cells and to create abstract models. Such studies will allow us to understand living cells and populations of cells in new ways. New X-ray lasers, like the European XFEL, will produce billions of pulses per day, and could open new areas in structural sciences.

National Category
Biophysics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300201 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2016.58 (DOI)000390225400003 ()
Note

Data Descriptor

Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Ekeberg, T., Svenda, M., Seibert, M. M., Abergel, C., Maia, F. R. .., Seltzer, V., . . . Hajdu, J. (2016). Single-shot diffraction data from the Mimivirus particle using an X-ray free-electron laser. Scientific Data, 3, Article ID UNSP 160060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-shot diffraction data from the Mimivirus particle using an X-ray free-electron laser
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id UNSP 160060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Free-electron lasers (FEL) hold the potential to revolutionize structural biology by producing X-ray pules short enough to outrun radiation damage, thus allowing imaging of biological samples without the limitation from radiation damage. Thus, a major part of the scientific case for the first FELs was three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of non-crystalline biological objects. In a recent publication we demonstrated the first 3D reconstruction of a biological object from an X-ray FEL using this technique. The sample was the giant Mimivirus, which is one of the largest known viruses with a diameter of 450 nm. Here we present the dataset used for this successful reconstruction. Data-analysis methods for single-particle imaging at FELs are undergoing heavy development but data collection relies on very limited time available through a highly competitive proposal process. This dataset provides experimental data to the entire community and could boost algorithm development and provide a benchmark dataset for new algorithms.

National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314814 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2016.60 (DOI)000390225400005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research CouncilStiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
van der Schot, G., Svenda, M., Maia, F. R. N., Hantke, M., DePonte, D. P., Seibert, M. M., . . . Ekeberg, T. (2015). Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser. Nature Communications, 6, Article ID 5704.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser
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2015 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 5704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There exists a conspicuous gap of knowledge about the organization of life at mesoscopic levels. Ultra-fast coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers can probe structures at the relevant length scales and may reach sub-nanometer resolution on micron-sized living cells. Here we show that we can introduce a beam of aerosolised cyanobacteria into the focus of the Linac Coherent Light Source and record diffraction patterns from individual living cells at very low noise levels and at high hit ratios. We obtain two-dimensional projection images directly from the diffraction patterns, and present the results as synthetic X-ray Nomarski images calculated from the complex-valued reconstructions. We further demonstrate that it is possible to record diffraction data to nanometer resolution on live cells with X-ray lasers. Extension to sub-nanometer resolution is within reach, although improvements in pulse parameters and X-ray area detectors will be necessary to unlock this potential.

National Category
Structural Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245040 (URN)10.1038/ncomms6704 (DOI)000350034400002 ()25669616 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-24 Created: 2015-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, J., Martin, A. V., Liang, M., Timneanu, N., Aquila, A., Wang, F., . . . Barty, A. (2014). Automated identification and classification of single particle serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction data. Optics Express, 22(3), 2497-2510
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated identification and classification of single particle serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction data
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2014 (English)In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 2497-2510Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The first hard X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), produces 120 shots per second. Particles injected into the X-ray beam are hit randomly and in unknown orientations by the extremely intense X-ray pulses, where the femtosecond-duration X-ray pulses diffract from the sample before the particle structure is significantly changed even though the sample is ultimately destroyed by the deposited X-ray energy. Single particle X-ray diffraction experiments generate data at the FEL repetition rate, resulting in more than 400,000 detector readouts in an hour, the data stream during an experiment contains blank frames mixed with hits on single particles, clusters and contaminants. The diffraction signal is generally weak and it is superimposed on a low but continually fluctuating background signal, originating from photon noise in the beam line and electronic noise from the detector. Meanwhile, explosion of the sample creates fragments with a characteristic signature. Here, we describe methods based on rapid image analysis combined with ion Time-of-Flight (ToF) spectroscopy of the fragments to achieve an efficient, automated and unsupervised sorting of diffraction data. The studies described here form a basis for the development of real-time frame rejection methods, e. g. for the European XFEL, which is expected to produce 100 million pulses per hour. (C)2014 Optical Society of America

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-222943 (URN)10.1364/OE.22.002497 (DOI)000332518100035 ()
Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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