Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Pereira, J. G., Rosalino, L. M., Ekblom, A. & Santos, M. J. (2024). Livelihood vulnerability and human-wildlife interactions across protected areas. Ecology and Society, 29(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Livelihood vulnerability and human-wildlife interactions across protected areas
2024 (English)In: Ecology and Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 29, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Protected Areas (PAs) are important wildlife refuges and act as climate change buffers, but they may impact human livelihoods, particularly engendering a high risk of negative human -wildlife interactions (HWI). Understanding synergies and tradeoffs among the drivers of overall human vulnerability within PAs is needed to ensure good outcomes for conservation and human wellbeing. We examined how climate variability, HWI, and socio-demographics affect livelihood vulnerability across three PAs in Mozambique, Southeast Africa. We used structured questionnaires to obtain information on livelihood vulnerability and socialecological context -specific variables. We applied principal component analysis to understand synergies and trade-offs between the dimensions of vulnerability and linear models to test the effect of social -ecological drivers on vulnerability. We show that households are mostly vulnerable within PAs due to exposure to climate variability and to HWI, and their low capacity to employ livelihood strategies or to have a strong social network. Furthermore, we show that vulnerability to HWI and climate variability increases with distance to strict protection areas within the PAs and distance to rivers, which implies that proximity to strict protection areas and rivers within PAs still promotes better livelihood conditions than elsewhere. On the other hand, we also found that lower access to infrastructure and other livelihood assets enhances vulnerability, which reflects a trade-off within PAs that potentially limits the benefits of socially inclusive conservation. Our results show that the impacts of PAs, HWI, and climate on community vulnerability should not be viewed in isolation, but instead, conservation and livelihood improvement strategies should reflect their interconnectedness. Although livelihood vulnerability appears to be shaped by these general effects of PAs, it is important also to consider the local PA context when addressing or mitigating livelihood vulnerability in and around them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Resilience Alliance, 2024
Keywords
climate change, human-wildlife interactions, livelihood vulnerability index, protected areas, social networks
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-524630 (URN)10.5751/ES-14605-290113 (DOI)001166959600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-03-13 Created: 2024-03-13 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Gota, P. & Ekblom, A. (2024). Locally protected forests: status, character and challenges a case study of Inhambane Province, southern Mozambique. Biodiversity and Conservation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Locally protected forests: status, character and challenges a case study of Inhambane Province, southern Mozambique
2024 (English)In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Mozambique has undocumented forest patches that are cultural landscapes and locally protected as heritage sites. Using the case of Inhambane Province, in this paper, we present the status and purposes of forest patches protected by local communities and discuss threats working against local protection. Findings point out that these heritage forests are reservoirs for biodiversity conservation and the local system of conservation is effective, but there are challenges local custodians face to safeguard heritage forests, ranging from illegal logging, misrecognition of customary protection and lack of legislation enforcement. We argue that the existence of heritage forests requires collaboration between entities dealing with forests, heritage and conservation. We suggest strategies to increase protection in the Inhambane Province and the Mozambique context. This will support local institutions in the protection of heritage forests, as biodiversity reservoirs and in keeping heritage practices and the customary protection of heritage forests alive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
Biocultural, Biodiversity, Communities, Conservation, Woodland, Heritage
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-528133 (URN)10.1007/s10531-024-02822-z (DOI)001187398000001 ()
Funder
Uppsala UniversitySida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 51140073
Available from: 2024-05-16 Created: 2024-05-16 Last updated: 2024-05-16Bibliographically approved
Gillson, L., Hoffman, M. T., Gell, P. A., Ekblom, A. & Bond, W. J. (2024). Trees, carbon, and the psychology of landscapes. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 39(4), 359-367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trees, carbon, and the psychology of landscapes
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mitigating climate change while safeguarding biodiversity and livelihoods is a major challenge. However, rampant afforestation threatens biodiversity and livelihoods, with questionable benefits to carbon storage. The narrative of landscape degradation is often applied without considering the history of the landscape. While some landscapes are undoubtedly deforested, others existed in open or mosaic states before human intervention, or have been deliberately maintained as such. In psychology, a 'fundamental attribution error' is made when characteristics are attributed without consideration of context or circumstances. We apply this concept to landscapes, and then propose a process that avoids attribution errors by testing a null hypothesis regarding past forest extent, using palaeoecology and other long-term data, alongside ecological and stakeholder knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cell Press, 2024
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-530581 (URN)10.1016/j.tree.2023.11.008 (DOI)001223597900001 ()38129213 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-06-13 Created: 2024-06-13 Last updated: 2024-06-13Bibliographically approved
Chakrabarti, S. & Ekblom, A. (2023). Covid-19 pandemic effects and responses in the Maasai Mara Conservancy. Tourism and Hospitality Research, 0(0)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Covid-19 pandemic effects and responses in the Maasai Mara Conservancy
2023 (English)In: Tourism and Hospitality Research, ISSN 1467-3584, E-ISSN 1742-9692, Vol. 0, no 0Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Local comparisons of effects, responses and mitigations to the Covid-19 pandemic are of vital importance inbuilding a sustainable tourism. This is particularly the case for conservancies in Africa which is largely dependent on international tourism. Qualitative interviews were carried out in the Kenya Maasai Mara WildlifeConservancies Association (MMWCA)with landowners, lodge managers and staff, tourism operators, community organisations and NGOs between January and May 2021. The MMWCA is an important case study asconservancies pay lease payments to more than 14,528 landowners through tourism revenues. The results showhow partner conservancies took different paths in securing payments of leases and salaries by rotating staff,attracting international funding and by targeting domestic tourism. Meanwhile, landowners experimented withalternative economic activities such as cattle herding and diary production. The study shows the strength ofMMWCA as a stakeholder partnership to proactively design measures including renegotiation of leasepayments, in soliciting external funding and in re-distributing funding. The positive role of domestic tourismis also stressed. The pandemic brought to the forefront discussions on equity and benefit sharing and on thesustainability of the model itself. Recommendations are given to strengthen possibilities for alternative incomessources and for a diversification of strategies of the MMWCA partners, including the need to stimulate domestictourism as a parallel source of income. These recommendations are also relevant to conservation areas acrossthe African continent

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Covid-19, nature tourism, masai-mara conservancy, conservation, community conservation
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-514264 (URN)10.1177/14673584231162275 (DOI)000949562400001 ()
Available from: 2023-10-16 Created: 2023-10-16 Last updated: 2024-04-19
Wehlin, J., Ljunge, M. O., Larsson, P. I., Dögg Eddudóttir, S., Ekblom, A. & Eriksson, J. A. (2023). Hunter-gatherer farming during the first millennium bce in inland, boreal landscapes: new pollen analytical and archaeological evidence from Dalarna, central Sweden. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 32(6), 615-633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hunter-gatherer farming during the first millennium bce in inland, boreal landscapes: new pollen analytical and archaeological evidence from Dalarna, central Sweden
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 615-633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The archaeological evidence of a sedentary hunter-gatherer society during the early metal ages, i.e. the frst and second millennia bce, in the central Scandinavian boreal inlands has previously been overlooked. In order to gain a deeper understandingof these past societies we have combined archaeological data with landscape-scale changes based on pollen records. Thecombined record clearly indicates landscape use characterized by domestication strategies that started during the Late BronzeAge ca. 1000 bce and further intensifed during the Early Iron Age. Indications of cultivation of plants, as well as possibleburning practices to clear shrub and forest, clearly show that arable farming and grazing were practiced in the area earlierthan had previously been assumed. The farming economy seems to have involved mainly small scale arable farming. Fishingand hunting continued to be important, but the investment in the landscape shown by both pitfall systems and agriculturealso express a domestication that would have required settled presence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Sweden, Pollen analysis, Archaeology, Boreal forest, Arable farming
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-509090 (URN)10.1007/s00334-023-00933-1 (DOI)001045646100001 ()
Funder
Uppsala UniversityMarcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2019.0118
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-01-25Bibliographically approved
Macamo, S. L., Ekblom, A., Sinclair, P. J. J. & Adamowicz, L. (2023). The Manyikeni and Chibuene Archaeological Sites, Mozambique: Prospects for their Conservation and Management. In: Nuno Lopes; Walter Rossa; Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo (Ed.), Other landscapes of cultural heritage(s): history and politics (pp. 319-339). Coimbra: Coimbra University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Manyikeni and Chibuene Archaeological Sites, Mozambique: Prospects for their Conservation and Management
2023 (English)In: Other landscapes of cultural heritage(s): history and politics / [ed] Nuno Lopes; Walter Rossa; Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo, Coimbra: Coimbra University Press , 2023, p. 319-339Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper outlines the history of research and heritage management of Manyikeni (a Zimbabwe tradition site dated 1200-1700 AD) and the trading station of Chibuene (dated from 400-present). Both sites are located in the District of Vilankulos, in Inhambane Province of Southern Mozambique. Archaeological work has been conducted at both sites since the 1970s with significant participation of local residents and researchers from Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo and external researchers. The paper discusses heritage measures for these two sites including also a newly reported stone enclosure (Zimbabwe) of Ngomene, in Vilankulos, c.56.7km south of Chibuene. We also discuss the heritage and cultural tourism potential of the area in terms of proximity to the marine national park of Bazaruto, for a sustainable heritage conservation program in the wider processes of socio-economic development. We use the Urban Historic Landscape, or HUL approach associated with the notion of the living heritage to meet community needs. This is reinforced by the recently adopted marine cultural heritage approach of the Rising from the Depths Network in Eastern Africa, aiming to benefit communities, living specifically on the coast.

The paper argues for an integrated biocultural heritage approach for sustainable conservation through the establishment of “Archaeological Parks” and exemplifies efforts towards these goals on the sites and the possibilities for such an endeavor in the current national cultural and natural legislation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Coimbra: Coimbra University Press, 2023
Keywords
Conservation, Cultural and Natural Heritage Legislation, Bio-cultural Heritage, Archaeological Parks, Local Communities, Heritage Management
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-518899 (URN)978-989-26-2332-0 (ISBN)978-989-26-2331-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-28 Created: 2023-12-28 Last updated: 2024-03-20Bibliographically approved
Gillson, L., Razanatsoa, E., Razafimanantsoa, A. H., Virah-Sawmy, M. & Ekblom, A. (2023). The role of palaeoecology in reconciling biodiversity conservation, livelihoods and carbon storage in Madagascar. Frontiers in Conservation Science, 4, Article ID 1286459.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of palaeoecology in reconciling biodiversity conservation, livelihoods and carbon storage in Madagascar
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Conservation Science, E-ISSN 2673-611X, Vol. 4, article id 1286459Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Planting trees is proposed as an important climate mitigation tool, but can be detrimental to biodiversity and livelihoods if not carefully planned and managed, with landscape history and livelihoods in mind. In Madagascar, deforestation is of concern, and a threat to forest-adapted biota. However, much of Madagascar's landscape harbours ancient mosaic and open ecosystems that are home to unique suites of flora and fauna and provide a wide range of ecosystem services. Though guidelines for ecologically and socially responsible reforestation are emerging, the potential role of landscape history and palaeoecology has been generally underemphasised. Here, using Madagascar as a case study, we argue that forest restoration projects need a sound understanding of landscape history that includes a greater integration of palaeoecological data. This would help establish the former composition and extent of forests and also investigate the antiquity of open and mosaic ecosystems. When economic interests are strong, information from palaeoecology and environmental history can help reduce biases when identifying appropriate locations and suites of species for forestation. Furthermore, a reflective approach to landscape history can contribute to restoration projects that integrate cultural and livelihood considerations. A transdisciplinary approach that considers local needs and cultural context can facilitate the design and implementation of restoration projects that share benefits equitably. Underpinning this ambition is a more comprehensive consideration of ecosystem service benefits in a changing climate that includes accurate carbon storage calculations, as well as other ecosystem services including water provision, soil formation and erosion prevention, grazing resources, medicine and cultural components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
ecosystem services, livelihoods, palaeoecology, reforestation, restoration
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-522401 (URN)10.3389/fcosc.2023.1286459 (DOI)001136542200001 ()
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ekblom, A. & Notelid, M. (2022). Archaeological site database, Limpopo National Park, Mozambique: Archaeological and local heritage sites. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological site database, Limpopo National Park, Mozambique: Archaeological and local heritage sites
2022 (English)Data set, Primary data
Place, publisher, year
Uppsala: , 2022
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-488639 (URN)
Available from: 2022-11-20 Created: 2022-11-20 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
(2022). Archaeological site database, Limpopo National Park, Mozambique: Archaeological and local heritage sites. Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological site database, Limpopo National Park, Mozambique: Archaeological and local heritage sites
2022 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Site data (lat, long), site description and classification. Site mainly from within Limpopo National Park, Mozambqiue and also the Massingir area. See page "explanation" for a detailed explanation of the dataset.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2022
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-533713 (URN)
Available from: 2024-06-27 Created: 2024-06-27 Last updated: 2024-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ferrara, V., Ekblom, A. & Wästfelt, A. (2022). From landscape as heritage to biocultural heritage in a landscape: The ecological and cultural legacy of millennial land use practices for future natures. In: Giacomo Pettenati (Ed.), Landscape as heritage: international critical perspectives (pp. 80-90). Abingdon; New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From landscape as heritage to biocultural heritage in a landscape: The ecological and cultural legacy of millennial land use practices for future natures
2022 (English)In: Landscape as heritage: international critical perspectives / [ed] Giacomo Pettenati, Abingdon; New York: Routledge, 2022, p. 80-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In many landscapes today, biological diversity is the ecological and cultural legacy of millennial interactions between land use practices and always changing environmental conditions. Thus, landscapes must be seen as heterogeneous, shaped through interacting different temporal and spatial scales. In our contribution we conceptualise biocultural heritage as space-time heterarchies, the endless results of repeated feedback between land use as human ecological process and the response of the ecosystems themselves. We provide the example of the olive intercropping landscape from a rural area of inner Sicily (Cozzo del Lampo hill, Villarosa), and we explore the potential of our conceptualisation for landscape heritage management. The discussion is centred on the acknowledgement of the “ecological function” played by place-based communities, as a key grounding step for the re-appropriation of our ecological engagement with landscape and place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon; New York: Routledge, 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-491145 (URN)10.4324/9781003195238-7 (DOI)9781003195238 (ISBN)9781032046235 (ISBN)9781032049342 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020–02625
Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2023-05-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
Landscape transformations and socio-ecological management in Limpopo National Park, Mozambique. [2012-01063_VR]; Uppsala UniversityThe Biocultural Heritage of Sicilian Olive Trees [2020-02625_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9248-5516

Search in DiVA

Show all publications