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Stattin, E.-L., Johansson, J., Gudmundsson, S., Ameur, A., Lundberg, S., Bondeson, M.-L. & Wilbe, M. (2018). A novel ECEL1 mutation expands the phenotype of distal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 5D to include pretibial vertical skin crease. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 176(6), 1405-1410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel ECEL1 mutation expands the phenotype of distal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 5D to include pretibial vertical skin crease
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 176, no 6, p. 1405-1410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by multiple joint contractures often in association with other congenital abnormalities. Pretibial linear vertical creases are a rare finding associated with arthrogryposis, and the etiology of the specific condition is unknown. We aimed to genetically and clinically characterize a boy from a consanguineous family, presenting with AMC and pretibial vertical linear creases on the shins. Whole exome sequencing and variant analysis revealed homozygous novel missense variants of ECEL1 (c.1163T > C, p.Leu388Pro, NM_004826) and MUSK (c.2572C > T, p.Arg858Cys, NM_005592). Both variants are predicted to have deleterious effects on the protein function, with amino acid positions highly conserved among species. The variants segregated in the family, with healthy mother, father, and sister being heterozygous carriers and the index patient being homozygous for both mutations. We report on a unique patient with a novel ECEL1 homozygous mutation, expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Distal AMC Type 5D to include vertical linear skin creases. The homozygous mutation in MUSK is of unknown clinical significance. MUSK mutations have previously shown to cause congenital myasthenic syndrome, a neuromuscular disorder with defects in the neuromuscular junction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
arthrogryposis multiplex congenital, congenital myasthenic syndrome, ECEL1, vertical linear skin creases, whole exome sequencing
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364512 (URN)10.1002/ajmg.a.38691 (DOI)000434040600017 ()29663639 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Höijer, I., Tsai, Y.-C., Clark, T. A., Kotturi, P., Dahl, N., Stattin, E., . . . Ameur, A. (2018). Detailed analysis of HTT repeat elements in human blood using targeted amplification-free long-read sequencing. Human Mutation, 39(9), 1262-1272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detailed analysis of HTT repeat elements in human blood using targeted amplification-free long-read sequencing
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2018 (English)In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 1262-1272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Amplification of DNA is required as a mandatory step during library preparation in most targeted sequencing protocols. This can be a critical limitation when targeting regions that are highly repetitive or with extreme guanine-cytosine (GC) content, including repeat expansions associated with human disease. Here, we used an amplification-free protocol for targeted enrichment utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 system (No-Amp Targeted sequencing) in combination with single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing for studying repeat elements in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, where an expanded CAG repeat is causative for Huntington disease. We also developed a robust data analysis pipeline for repeat element analysis that is independent of alignment of reads to a reference genome. The method was applied to 11 diagnostic blood samples, and for all 22 alleles the resulting CAG repeat count agreed with previous results based on fragment analysis. The amplification-free protocol also allowed for studying somatic variability of repeat elements in our samples, without the interference of PCR stutter. In summary, with No-Amp Targeted sequencing in combination with our analysis pipeline, we could accurately study repeat elements that are difficult to investigate using PCR-based methods.

Keywords
amplification-free sequencing, HTT, Huntington disease, No-Amp Targeted sequencing, repeat expansion, SMRT sequencing, somatic mosaicism, targeted enrichment, targeted sequencing
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364189 (URN)10.1002/humu.23580 (DOI)000443229000010 ()29932473 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Ardui, S., Ameur, A., Vermeesch, J. R. & Hestand, M. S. (2018). Single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing comes of age: applications and utilities for medical diagnostics. Nucleic Acids Research, 46(5), 2159-2168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing comes of age: applications and utilities for medical diagnostics
2018 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 2159-2168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Short read massive parallel sequencing has emerged as a standard diagnostic tool in the medical setting. However, short read technologies have inherent limitations such as GC bias, difficulties mapping to repetitive elements, trouble discriminating paralogous sequences, and difficulties in phasing alleles. Long read single molecule sequencers resolve these obstacles. Moreover, they offer higher consensus accuracies and can detect epigenetic modifications from native DNA. The first commercially available long read single molecule platform was the RS system based on PacBio's single molecule realtime (SMRT) sequencing technology, which has since evolved into their RSII and Sequel systems. Here we capsulize how SMRT sequencing is revolutionizing constitutional, reproductive, cancer, microbial and viral genetic testing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351426 (URN)10.1093/nar/gky066 (DOI)000427677100008 ()29401301 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Papoutsoglou, P., Tsubakihara, Y., Caja, L., Pallis, P., Ameur, A., Heldin, C.-H. & Moustakas, A. (2018). The TGFB2-AS1 lncRNA regulates TGFβ signaling by modulating corepressor activity.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The TGFB2-AS1 lncRNA regulates TGFβ signaling by modulating corepressor activity
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2018 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

LncRNAs regulate cell function through many physiological processes. We have identified lncRNAs whose expression is regulated by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), by a transcriptomic screen. We focused on TGFB2-antisense RNA1 (TGFB2-AS1), which was induced by TGFβ through Smad and protein kinase pathways, and exhibited predominantly nuclear localization. Depleting TGFB2-AS1 enhanced TGFβ/Smad-mediated transcription and expression of the TGFβ-target genes FN1 and SERPINE1. Overexpression of TGFB2-AS1 reduced expression of these genes, attenuated TGFβ-induced cell growth arrest, and altered BMP and Wnt pathway gene profiles. Mechanistically, TGFB2-AS1 mainly via its 3’ terminal region, bound to EED, an adaptor of the Polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2), promoting repressive histone H3K27me3 modifications at TGFβ-target gene promoters. Silencing EED or inhibiting PRC2 methylation activity, partially rescued TGFB2-AS1 mediated gene repression. Our observations support the notion that TGFB2-AS1 is a TGFβ-induced lncRNA with inhibitory functions on TGFβ and BMP pathways output, constituting an auto-regulatory negative feedback mechanism that balances TGFβ- and BMP-mediated responses.

National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363700 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-20 Created: 2018-10-20 Last updated: 2018-12-03
Bondeson, M.-L., Ericson, K., Gudmundsson, S., Ameur, A., Ponten, F., Wesström, J., . . . Wilbe, M. (2017). A nonsense mutation in CEP55 defines a new locus for a Meckel-like syndrome, an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy.. Clinical Genetics, 92(5), 510-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nonsense mutation in CEP55 defines a new locus for a Meckel-like syndrome, an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy.
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Genetics, ISSN 0009-9163, E-ISSN 1399-0004, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 510-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mutations in genes involved in the cilium-centrosome complex are called ciliopathies. Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a ciliopathic lethal autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by genetically and clinically heterogeneous manifestations, including renal cystic dysplasia, occipital encephalocele and polydactyly. Several genes have previously been associated with MKS and MKS-like phenotypes, but there are still genes remaining to be discovered. We have used whole exome sequencing (WES) to uncover the genetics of a suspected autosomal recessive Meckel syndrome phenotype in a family with two affected fetuses. RNA studies and histopathological analysis was performed for further delineation. WES lead to identification of a homozygous nonsense mutation c.256C>T (p.Arg86*) in CEP55 (centrosomal protein of 55 kDa) in the affected fetus. The variant has previously been identified in carriers in low frequencies, and segregated in the family. CEP55 is an important centrosomal protein required for the mid-body formation at cytokinesis. Our results expand the list of centrosomal proteins implicated in human ciliopathies and provide evidence for an essential role of CEP55 during embryogenesis and development of disease.

Keywords
CEP55, Meckel-like, ciliopathy, cytokinesis, whole exome sequencing
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318127 (URN)10.1111/cge.13012 (DOI)000412590300007 ()28295209 (PubMedID)
Funder
Magnus Bergvall FoundationLars Hierta Memorial FoundationSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Wilbe, M., Gudmundsson, S., Johansson, J., Ameur, A., Stattin, E.-L., Annerén, G., . . . Bondeson, M.-L. (2017). A novel approach using long-read sequencing and ddPCR to investigate gonadal mosaicism and estimate recurrence risk in two families with developmental disorders. Prenatal Diagnosis, 37(11), 1146-1154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel approach using long-read sequencing and ddPCR to investigate gonadal mosaicism and estimate recurrence risk in two families with developmental disorders
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2017 (English)In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 1146-1154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

De novo mutations contribute significantly to severe early-onset genetic disorders. Even if the mutation is apparently de novo, there is a recurrence risk due to parental germ line mosaicism, depending on in which gonadal generation the mutation occurred.

Methods

We demonstrate the power of using SMRT sequencing and ddPCR to determine parental origin and allele frequencies of de novo mutations in germ cells in two families whom had undergone assisted reproduction.

Results

In the first family, a TCOF1 variant c.3156C>T was identified in the proband with Treacher Collins syndrome. The variant affects splicing and was determined to be of paternal origin. It was present in <1% of the paternal germ cells, suggesting a very low recurrence risk. In the second family, the couple had undergone several unsuccessful pregnancies where a de novo mutation PTPN11 c.923A>C causing Noonan syndrome was identified. The variant was present in 40% of the paternal germ cells suggesting a high recurrence risk.

Conclusions

Our findings highlight a successful strategy to identify the parental origin of mutations and to investigate the recurrence risk in couples that have undergone assisted reproduction with an unknown donor or in couples with gonadal mosaicism that will undergo preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342916 (URN)10.1002/pd.5156 (DOI)000415897200012 ()28921562 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Pan, G., Ameur, A., Enroth, S., Bysani, M., Nord, H., Cavalli, M., . . . Wadelius, C. (2017). PATZ1 down-regulates FADS1 by binding to rs174557 and is opposed by SP1/SREBP1c. Nucleic Acids Research, 45(5), 2408-2422
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PATZ1 down-regulates FADS1 by binding to rs174557 and is opposed by SP1/SREBP1c
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2017 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 2408-2422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The FADS1 and FADS2 genes in the FADS cluster encode the rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Genetic variation in this region has been associated with a large number of diseases and traits many of them correlated to differences in metabolism of PUFAs. However, the causative variants leading to these associations have not been identified. Here we find that the multiallelic rs174557 located in an AluYe5 element in intron 1 of FADS1 is functional and lies within a PATZ1 binding site. The derived allele of rs174557, which is the common variant in most populations, diminishes binding of PATZ1, a transcription factor conferring allele-specific downregulation of FADS1 The PATZ1 binding site overlaps with a SP1 site. The competitive binding between the suppressive PATZ1 and the activating complex of SP1 and SREBP1c determines the enhancer activity of this region, which regulates expression of FADS1.

National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317999 (URN)10.1093/nar/gkw1186 (DOI)000397286600024 ()27932482 (PubMedID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceSwedish Research Council, 521-2010-3505 6212011-6052 521-2012-2884Swedish Diabetes AssociationSwedish Cancer Society, 15 0878
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Gudmundsson, S., Wilbe, M., Ekvall, S., Ameur, A., Cahill, N., Alexandrov, L. B., . . . Bondeson, M.-L. (2017). Revertant mosaicism repairs skin lesions in a patient with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome by second-site mutations in connexin 26. Human Molecular Genetics, 26(6), 1070-1077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revertant mosaicism repairs skin lesions in a patient with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome by second-site mutations in connexin 26
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2017 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1070-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Revertant mosaicism(RM) is a naturally occurring phenomenon where the pathogenic effect of a germline mutation is corrected by a second somatic event. Development of healthy-looking skin due to RM has been observed in patients with various inherited skin disorders, but not in connexin-related disease. We aimed to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of suspected RM in the skin of a patient with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome. The patient was diagnosed with KID syndrome due to characteristic skin lesions, hearing deficiency and keratitis. Investigation of GJB2 encoding connexin (Cx) 26 revealed heterozygosity for the recurrent de novo germline mutation, c. 148G>A, p. Asp50Asn. At age 20, the patient developed spots of healthy-looking skin that grew in size and number within widespread erythrokeratodermic lesions. Ultradeep sequencing of two healthy-looking skin biopsies identified five somatic nonsynonymous mutations, independently present in cis with the p. Asp50Asn mutation. Functional studies of Cx26 in HeLa cells revealed co-expression of Cx26-Asp50Asn and wild-type Cx26 in gap junction channel plaques. However, Cx26-Asp50Asn with the second-site mutations identified in the patient displayed no formation of gap junction channel plaques. We argue that the second-site mutations independently inhibit Cx26-Asp50Asn expression in gap junction channels, reverting the dominant negative effect of the p. Asp50Asn mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first time RM has been reported to result in the development of healthy-looking skin in a patient with KID syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324349 (URN)10.1093/hmg/ddx017 (DOI)000400911000004 ()28158657 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2013-57X-22309-3
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2017-06-15Bibliographically approved
Stattin, E., Henning, P., Klar, J., McDermott, E., Stecksen-Blicks, C., Sandström, P.-E., . . . Lerner, U. H. (2017). SNX10 gene mutation leading to osteopetrosis with dysfunctional osteoclasts.. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 3012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SNX10 gene mutation leading to osteopetrosis with dysfunctional osteoclasts.
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a heterogeneous disorder, characterized by defective osteoclastic resorption of bone that results in increased bone density. We have studied nine individuals with an intermediate form of ARO, from the county of Västerbotten in Northern Sweden. All afflicted individuals had an onset in early infancy with optic atrophy, and in four patients anemia was present at diagnosis. Tonsillar herniation, foramen magnum stenosis, and severe osteomyelitis of the jaw were common clinical features. Whole exome sequencing, verified by Sanger sequencing, identified a splice site mutation c.212 + 1 G > T in the SNX10 gene encoding sorting nexin 10. Sequence analysis of the SNX10 transcript in patients revealed activation of a cryptic splice site in intron 4 resulting in a frame shift and a premature stop (p.S66Nfs * 15). Haplotype analysis showed that all cases originated from a single mutational event, and the age of the mutation was estimated to be approximately 950 years. Functional analysis of osteoclast progenitors isolated from peripheral blood of patients revealed that stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) resulted in a robust formation of large, multinucleated osteoclasts which generated sealing zones; however these osteoclasts exhibited defective ruffled borders and were unable to resorb bone in vitro.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-325569 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-02533-2 (DOI)000402879800068 ()28592808 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Rheumatism Association
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
Ameur, A., Dahlberg, J., Olason, P., Vezzi, F., Karlsson, R., Martin, M., . . . Gyllensten, U. B. (2017). SweGen: a whole-genome data resource of genetic variability in a cross-section of the Swedish population. European Journal of Human Genetics, 25(11), 1253-1260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SweGen: a whole-genome data resource of genetic variability in a cross-section of the Swedish population
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1253-1260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we describe the SweGen data set, a comprehensive map of genetic variation in the Swedish population. These data represent a basic resource for clinical genetics laboratories as well as for sequencing-based association studies by providing information on genetic variant frequencies in a cohort that is well matched to national patient cohorts. To select samples for this study, we first examined the genetic structure of the Swedish population using high-density SNP-array data from a nation-wide cohort of over 10 000 Swedish-born individuals included in the Swedish Twin Registry. A total of 1000 individuals, reflecting a cross-section of the population and capturing the main genetic structure, were selected for whole-genome sequencing. Analysis pipelines were developed for automated alignment, variant calling and quality control of the sequencing data. This resulted in a genome-wide collection of aggregated variant frequencies in the Swedish population that we have made available to the scientific community through the website https://swefreq.nbis.se. A total of 29.2 million single-nucleotide variants and 3.8 million indels were detected in the 1000 samples, with 9.9 million of these variants not present in current databases. Each sample contributed with an average of 7199 individual-specific variants. In addition, an average of 8645 larger structural variants (SVs) were detected per individual, and we demonstrate that the population frequencies of these SVs can be used for efficient filtering analyses. Finally, our results show that the genetic diversity within Sweden is substantial compared with the diversity among continental European populations, underscoring the relevance of establishing a local reference data set.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337314 (URN)10.1038/ejhg.2017.130 (DOI)000412823800012 ()28832569 (PubMedID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0272Swedish Research CouncilSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), sens2016003EU, European Research Council, 282330
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6085-6749

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