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Stjernschantz Forsberg, Joanna
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Svensson, A. C., Stjernschantz Forsberg, J., Seblova, D. & Lager, A. (2017). Residential area and physical activity: A multi-level study of 68,000 adults in Stockholm County. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(1), 25-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residential area and physical activity: A multi-level study of 68,000 adults in Stockholm County
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To determine whether there are systematic differences in physical activity between residential areas after extensive control for sociodemographic factors at the individual level. Methods: Multi-level regressions of walking/bicycling, sedentary activities, household work and exercise were carried out in a representative sample of 68,303 adults in 39 residential areas in Stockholm County, first adjusting at the individual level for country of birth, sex, age, education, occupational class and income. The type of housing was then considered at the individual level or, for walking/bicycling and exercise, at both the individual and area levels (as a measure of area density). Results: After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, differences between residential areas remained in walking/bicycling, corresponding to 0.27 SD, or 50 min/week between the most and least active areas. Forty per cent of this difference could be explained by the type of housing at the area level. For sedentary activities and household work, respectively, much of the variation that remained after adjustment for sociodemographic factors was, in turn, explained by the type of housing at the individual level, leaving a difference of 0.16 SD (80 min/week) and 0.13 SD (60 min/week), respectively. For exercise, the corresponding difference was 0.11 SD (11 min/week, not sensitive to housing). Conclusions: Area level factors may influence walking/bicycling. High area density was associated with more activity. However, high density also comes with a type of housing (apartments) that is associated with less household work and, surprisingly, more sedentary activities, introducing a challenging trade-off. The differences in exercise were smaller than for all other types of activities.

Keywords
Housing, population density, socioeconomic factors, physical activity, physical inactivity, multi-level regression
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315806 (URN)10.1177/1403494816682377 (DOI)000391527400005 ()27940536 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, J. S. & Soini, S. (2014). A big step for Finnish biobanking. Nature reviews genetics, 15(1), 6-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A big step for Finnish biobanking
2014 (English)In: Nature reviews genetics, ISSN 1471-0056, E-ISSN 1471-0064, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 6-6Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-216245 (URN)10.1038/nrg3646 (DOI)000328892200008 ()
Available from: 2014-01-20 Created: 2014-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Stjernschantz Forsberg, J., Hansson, M. G. & Eriksson, S. (2014). Why participating in (certain) scientific research is a moral duty. Journal of Medical Ethics, 40(5), 325-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why participating in (certain) scientific research is a moral duty
2014 (English)In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 325-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our starting point in this article is the debate between John Harris and Iain Brassington on whether or not there is a duty to take part in scientific research. We consider the arguments that have been put forward based on fairness and a duty to rescue, and suggest an alternative justification grounded in a hypothetical agreement: that is, because effective healthcare cannot be taken for granted, but requires continuous medical research, and nobody knows what kind of healthcare they will need, participating in research should be viewed from the perspective of a social contract, based on our mutual need for medical advances.

National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Bioethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171897 (URN)10.1136/medethics-2012-100859 (DOI)000334614100010 ()
Available from: 2012-03-28 Created: 2012-03-28 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Forsberg, J. S. & Inoue, Y. (2013). Beware Side Effects of Research Ethics Revision [Letter to the editor]. Science, 341(6152), 1341-1342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beware Side Effects of Research Ethics Revision
2013 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 341, no 6152, p. 1341-1342Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209703 (URN)000324597200019 ()
Available from: 2013-10-24 Created: 2013-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, J. S. (2013). Comments on the Role of Consent and Individual Autonomy in the PIP Breast Implant Scandal. Public Health Ethics, 6(2), 223-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comments on the Role of Consent and Individual Autonomy in the PIP Breast Implant Scandal
2013 (English)In: Public Health Ethics, ISSN 1754-9973, E-ISSN 1754-9981, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 223-226Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The featured case discussion on the role of consent and individual autonomy in the PIP breast implant scandal raises interesting and important questions regarding the right of patients (and individuals in general) to decide whether to have their personal data included in medical registries and used for research. The fate of the National Breast Implant Registry, following the introduction of a policy that demanded formally recorded informed consent, is particularly enlightening. Combined with the (ex post) fact that reliable and comprehensive data would have been useful in this specific case, it clearly illustrates the dangers of overemphasizing individual autonomy in observational research. The issue is timely, as the European Commission has recently proposed a new Data Protection Regulation (European Commission, 2012) that may have serious implications for registry based research. In this commentary, I will first discuss two aspects of the regulatory framework that arguably contribute to the problematic situation and then offer an alternative view on why requiring consent should not be the default position in this kind of research.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207198 (URN)10.1093/phe/pht020 (DOI)000322749200009 ()
Available from: 2013-09-10 Created: 2013-09-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Stjernschantz Forsberg, J., Hansson, M. G. & Evers, K. (2013). International guidelines on biobank research leave researchers in ambiguity: why is this so?. European Journal of Epidemiology, 28(6), 449-451
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International guidelines on biobank research leave researchers in ambiguity: why is this so?
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 449-451Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205466 (URN)10.1007/s10654-013-9815-x (DOI)000321243900001 ()23740041 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-08-17 Created: 2013-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Stjernschantz Forsberg, J. (2012). Biobank Research: Individual Rights and Public Benefit. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biobank Research: Individual Rights and Public Benefit
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis is to investigate the relationship between individuals and society in the context of healthcare and medical research, more specifically concerning the rights and duties of individuals in regard to biobank-based research. My starting point is that we all have a strong vested interest in improved healthcare, and therefore the possibilities to conduct important research should be optimized. In the first article, I investigate whether individual results from research using samples in large-scale biobanks should be returned. I conclude that there is good reason not to implement such policies, and instead to allocate available resources to pursuing medical advances. In the second article, I compare consent for using stored samples in research with consent for organ donation, whereby many countries have adopted opt-out strategies in order to increase the number of organs available. I claim that the default position should be changed in biobank research as well, i.e. it should be presumed that individuals want to contribute rather than that they do not. In the third article, I argue that safeguarding autonomy by requiring informed consent for using samples in research not only defeats the interests of society but also runs counter to the interests of the individuals the policy purports to protect. Finally, in the fourth article I suggest that it is reasonable to view participation in medical research from the perspective of a social contract, built on our mutual need for medical advances, and that this implies that there is a moral duty to adhere to the contract by allowing one’s samples to be used in research. A central conclusion in this thesis is that biobank research should be viewed as a natural part of healthcare, like quality control, method development and teaching, and that as such, it ought to be endorsed and facilitated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. p. 83
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 762
Keywords
Biobank, Ethics, Consent, Returning results, Individual rights, Public good
National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171898 (URN)978-91-554-8332-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-10-06, Auditoriet Minus, Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-09-14 Created: 2012-03-28 Last updated: 2013-01-17Bibliographically approved
Evers, K., Stjernschantz Forsberg, J. & Hansson, M. (2012). Commercialization of Biobanks. Biopreservation and Biobanking, 10(1), 45-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commercialization of Biobanks
2012 (English)In: Biopreservation and Biobanking, ISSN 1947-5535, E-ISSN 1947-5543, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 45-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biobank policy and regulations profoundly vary between different societies. One area with profound differences in culture and tradition concerns commercialization, and the possibility of using the human body as a capital resource. In the United States there is acceptance of this possibility, whereas European law is based on principles that categorically prohibit selling parts of the human body. We suggest that questions of commercialization in the area of biobanking must be considered in relation to different ethical values, notably the principle of best possible use of collected biobank materials for the benefit of vital patient interests.

National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171502 (URN)10.1089/bio.2011.0041 (DOI)000300540800008 ()
Available from: 2012-03-20 Created: 2012-03-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M. G., Gattorno, M., Stjernschantz Forsberg, J., Feltelius, N., Martini, A. & Ruperto, N. (2012). Ethics bureaucracy: a significant hurdle for collaborative follow-up of drug effectiveness in rare childhood diseases. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 97(6), 561-563
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethics bureaucracy: a significant hurdle for collaborative follow-up of drug effectiveness in rare childhood diseases
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2012 (English)In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 97, no 6, p. 561-563Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-176529 (URN)10.1136/archdischild-2011-301175 (DOI)000304371100019 ()
Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M. G., Simonsson, B., Feltelius, N., Forsberg, J. S. & Hasford, J. (2012). Medical registries represent vital patient interests and should not be dismantled by stricter regulation. Cancer Epidemiology, 36(6), 575-578
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medical registries represent vital patient interests and should not be dismantled by stricter regulation
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2012 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 575-578Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Medical registries serve patients as beneficiaries of quality standards and new treatment opportunities. However, it has been argued that registries threaten patient privacy interests and should therefore be more strictly regulated.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

With the European Treatment and Outcome Study for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia as a concrete example we identify and describe how four of the major arguments put forward for stricter regulation fail.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that medical registries should be promoted both for research and quality control, and that the regulatory bureaucratic burden should be reduced.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-182557 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2012.06.009 (DOI)000312260900024 ()22796267 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-10-11 Created: 2012-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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