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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Spronk, I., Edgar, D. W., van Baar, M. E., Wood, F. M., Van Loey, N. E. E., Middelkoop, E., . . . Haagsma, J. A. (2020). Improved and standardized method for assessing years lived with disability after burns and its application to estimate the non-fatal burden of disease of burn injuries in Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands. BMC Public Health, 20, Article ID 121.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved and standardized method for assessing years lived with disability after burns and its application to estimate the non-fatal burden of disease of burn injuries in Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands
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2020 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Burden of disease estimates are an important resource in public health. Currently, robust estimates are not available for the burn population. Our objectives are to adapt a refined methodology (INTEGRIS method) to burns and to apply this new INTEGRIS-burns method to estimate, and compare, the burden of disease of burn injuries in Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands.

Methods: Existing European and Western-Australian health-related quality of life (HRQL) datasets were combined to derive disability weights for three homogenous burn injury groups based on percentage total body surface area (%TBSA) burned. Subsequently, incidence data from Australia, New Zealand, and the Netherlands from 2010 to 2017 were used to compute annual non-fatal burden of disease estimates for each of these three countries. Non-fatal burden of disease was measured by years lived with disability (YLD).

Results: The combined dataset included 7159 HRQL (EQ-5D-3 L) outcomes from 3401 patients. Disability weights ranged from 0.046 (subgroup < 5% TBSA burned > 24 months post-burn) to 0.497 (subgroup > 20% TBSA burned 0-1 months post-burn). In 2017 the non-fatal burden of disease of burns for the three countries (YLDs/100,000 inhabitants) was 281 for Australia, 279 for New Zealand and 133 for the Netherlands.

Conclusions: This project established a method for more precise estimates of the YLDs of burns, as it is the only method adapted to the nature of burn injuries and their recovery. Compared to previous used methods, the INTEGRIS-burns method includes improved disability weights based on severity categorization of burn patients; a better substantiated proportion of patients with lifelong disability based; and, the application of burn specific recovery timeframes. Information derived from the adapted method can be used as input for health decision making at both the national and international level. Future studies should investigate whether the application is valid in low- and middle- income countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2020
Keywords
Burden of disease, Burn injuries, Methodology, Disability weights
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-407648 (URN)10.1186/s12889-020-8233-8 (DOI)000513886500004 ()31996206 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved
Arakelian, E., Nyholm, L. & Öster, C. (2019). How Anesthesiologists and Nurse Anesthetists Assess and Handle Patients' Perioperative Worries Without a Validated Instrument. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 34(4), 810-819
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Anesthesiologists and Nurse Anesthetists Assess and Handle Patients' Perioperative Worries Without a Validated Instrument
2019 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 810-819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To study how nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologists assess and handle patients' perioperative anxiety without using a validated instrument.

DESIGN: Qualitative study.

METHODS: Individual in-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with nurse anesthetists (n = 9) and anesthesiologists (n = 5) from a university hospital in Sweden. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis according to Braun and Clark.

FINDINGS: Two themes were identified: (1) I ask about anxiety, look for visual signs, and observe communication and (2) I handle patients' anxieties individually. In addition to subthemes describing assessment and handling of adults, it appeared that parents played an important role in children's perioperative anxiety.

CONCLUSIONS: When not using a validated instrument, assessing perioperative anxiety is commonly based on the anesthesiologist's and nurse anesthetist's experience, knowledge, views, and attitudes. The evaluator's capability of using different strategies in the assessment and handling of perioperative anxiety is important.

Keywords
anesthesiologists, anxiety, evaluation, nurse anesthetists, perioperative
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377057 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.09.016 (DOI)000477975200020 ()30745079 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, J., Willebrand, M. & Öster, C. (2019). Identifying the Needs of Family Members in Burn Care: Nurses' Different Approaches. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 40(3), 336-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying the Needs of Family Members in Burn Care: Nurses' Different Approaches
2019 (English)In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 336-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore how nurses in burn care identify family members' needs of support and what support the nurses offer. Family members are an important source of short- and long-term support for burn survivors. Being a family member in burn specific as well as general care can be challenging in several ways. Nurses are recognized as well as positioned in the team for assessing and providing such support; however, little is known about how this is done. This is an explorative study with a qualitative descriptive design. Fourteen semistructured interviews with registered nurses working in national burn centers were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Systematic text condensation. The analysis resulted in four themes reflecting different approaches to assess the needs of family members: Active, Emotional, Passive, and Rejective Approach. Nurses in this study demonstrated different approaches to assessing needs in family members; it is possible that these differences may affect what support family members receive. Therefore, the importance of theoretical education, professional views, and local ward culture should be highlighted in ongoing work in improving care within burn care as well as similar health care contexts.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396560 (URN)10.1093/jbcr/irz018 (DOI)000490449100011 ()30957150 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Nehlin, C. & Öster, C. (2019). Measuring drinking motives in undergraduates: an exploration of the Drinking Motives Questionnaire-Revised in Swedish students. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, 14(1), Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring drinking motives in undergraduates: an exploration of the Drinking Motives Questionnaire-Revised in Swedish students
2019 (English)In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Alcohol consumption is generally high among undergraduate students and may lead to adverse consequences. Drinking motives play a vital role in the development of alcohol-related problems. The Drinking Motives Questionnaire-Revised (DMQ-R) and the short form of DMQ-R, DMQ-R SF, are widely used tools to identify drinking motives. Still, there is a need for further exploration of the instruments in different cultures and settings. The aims of this study were 1) to explore the four-factor structure of the DMQ-R and DMQ-R SF in Swedish undergraduate students 2) to investigate if extracting the SF responses from the DMQ-R is equivalent to the factor structure of the DMQ-R SF 3) to study the association between drinking motives and hazardous drinking. Methods Data were collected among 536 Swedish undergraduate students and were analyzed by confirmatory factor analyses, Mann-Whitney, chi-square tests and logistic regressions. Results We could confirm the four-dimensional structure of both versions of the DMQ. There was a similar (or in fact even slightly better) model fit of the short form and when drawing the SF items. Emotionally oriented motives (enhancement and coping), together with social motives, were strongly associated with hazardous or harmful drinking levels, whereas conformity motives were not. The enhancement motive showed the highest group mean value and was also the most common main motive. Students with hazardous drinking endorsed their motives more strongly than those without hazardous drinking, which is a finding worthy of further investigation. Conclusions The DMQ-R SF is suitable and preferable for Swedish student populations and extracting the SF responses from the DMQ-R is equivalent to the factor structure of the DMQ-R SF. In future research, effects of including the DMQ-R SF in preventive strategies and in interventions with risk drinking students would be of particular interest.

Keywords
Drinking motives, Students, Questionnaires, Validation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397946 (URN)10.1186/s13011-019-0239-9 (DOI)000495587200001 ()31703747 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-02-06Bibliographically approved
Gauffin, E. & Öster, C. (2019). Patient perception of long-term burn-specific health and congruence with the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief. Burns, 45(8), 1833-1840
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient perception of long-term burn-specific health and congruence with the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief
2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 1833-1840Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This qualitative study aims to explore former burn patients’ perception of burn-specific health and investigate how these experiences correspond to the subscales in the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B).

Method: Respondents were former burn patients, admitted to the Uppsala Burn Centre between 2000 and 2007. A total of 20 respondents with a Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) of 20% or larger, were approached at 10 to 17 years post-burn and interviewed using a semi-structured guide. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: Despite extensive burn injuries, respondents said they led a close-to-normal life. Their descriptions validated the significance of the existing themes of BSHS-B. Additional themes of importance for post-burn health were skin related problems, morphine de-escalation, the importance of work, stress and avoidance, mentality and the healthcare system.

Conclusion: The BSHS-B alone may not be sufficient in providing a comprehensive picture of former burn patients’ self-perceived health in the long-term perspective. Investigating supplementary areas reflecting former patients’ sociocultural and attitudinal environment, as well as personal factors, may be of great importance. 

Keywords
Health Related Quality of Life, Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B), Qualitative analysis, Burns
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380413 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.12.015 (DOI)000500769600012 ()31685387 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Nehlin, C., Wennberg, M. & Öster, C. (2018). How do people with mood and anxiety disorders perceive and interpret the Drinking Motives Questionnaire?: A think-aloud study in a clinical setting. Addiction science & clinical practice, 13, Article ID 7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do people with mood and anxiety disorders perceive and interpret the Drinking Motives Questionnaire?: A think-aloud study in a clinical setting
2018 (English)In: Addiction science & clinical practice, ISSN 1940-0632, E-ISSN 1940-0640, Vol. 13, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research has identified drinking motives as the final common pathway to alcohol use, and associations between specific drinking motives and drinking patterns have consistently been demonstrated. Data on drinking motives can be used for research, in the planning of prevention strategies and for treatment purposes. The Drinking Motives Questionnaire-Revised (DMQ-R) has become the most used measure of drinking motives. So far, the questionnaire has not been investigated with qualitative methods. The aim of this study was to investigate acceptability, accuracy and usability of the DMQ-R among persons receiving outpatient psychiatric care by studying how responders perceive and interpret the questionnaire.

Method: A cognitive interviewing technique, the think-aloud method, was used to collect data from 16 non-alcohol dependent patients seeking outpatient psychiatric care (12 women, 4 men). To analyse data, Qualitative Content Analysis was applied in which themes were formed from data only and not from predetermined areas of interest.

Results: Overall, acceptability of the DMQ-R was high although answers were sometimes given with low accuracy. Responders pointed out that they perceived the questionnaire as non-confrontational and exhaustive. Further, the DMQ-R seemed to launch processes of self-reflection.

Conclusions: Taken together, the results suggest a support for the use of DMQ-R also in the group of psychiatric outpatients. Still, when interpreting the DMQ-R, a certain insecurity of the exactness of answers should be considered. The graphic design should be particularly clear in this group of patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2018
Keywords
Questionnaires, Drinking motives, DMQ-R, Think-aloud method, Psychiatric care
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351435 (URN)10.1186/s13722-018-0109-1 (DOI)000427779900001 ()29534735 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Salberg, J., Folke, F., Ekselius, L. & Öster, C. (2018). Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(5), 1401-1410
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1401-1410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care.

Keywords
behavioural activation, evaluation, group intervention, mental health care, nursing
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364165 (URN)10.1111/inm.12439 (DOI)000443391700009 ()29446512 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Arakelian, E., Laurssen, E. & Öster, C. (2018). Older Patients' Worries in Connection With General Anesthesia and Surgery - A Qualitative Study. Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 33(6), 822-833
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Patients' Worries in Connection With General Anesthesia and Surgery - A Qualitative Study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 822-833Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine anxiety and what older patients worry about related to anesthesia and colorectal surgery, and their perceptions regarding nurses' ability to ease preoperative worry.

Design: Qualitative individual face-to-face interviews.

Methods: The study included 18 patients aged between 62 and 91 years with lower abdominal tumors. The study was conducted in two day-surgery wards in Sweden. Interview data were analyzed with Malterud's systematic text condensation.

Findings: Four themes were identified: (1) losing control of one's body, leaving one's life in someone else's hands, and the feeling that there is no going back, (2) claustrophobia and anticipated pain in an unknown environment, (3) unknown and frightening vocabulary concerning the surgery, and (4) what can happen if something goes wrong.

Conclusions: Patients worry about a number of things. If preoperative worry could be identified, actions taken to reduce worry could be personalized and patients' own strategies to reduce worries may be helpful for them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
Keywords
nursing, patients' experiences, preoperative, qualitative study, anxiety, assessment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371127 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2018.01.005 (DOI)000450368000006 ()29548667 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Nehlin, C., Carlsson, K. & Öster, C. (2018). Patients' Experiences of Using a Cellular Photo Digital Breathalyzer for Treatment Purposes. Journal of addiction medicine, 12(2), 107-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' Experiences of Using a Cellular Photo Digital Breathalyzer for Treatment Purposes
2018 (English)In: Journal of addiction medicine, ISSN 1932-0620, E-ISSN 1935-3227, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The field of eHealth systems is rapidly developing and is now expanding into alcohol treatment settings. Despite a growing public and professional interest, cellular photo digital breathalyzers (CPDBs) have not been investigated in a clinical context so far. In this study, we aimed to investigate the experiences of patients in alcohol treatment who had been using a CPDB—TripleA- for a minimum of three months. What are their personal experiences of using the CPDB? Do the patients think it supports them to change their drinking habits, and if so, in what way?

Methods: A qualitative interview study with individuals who had been using the CPDB TripleA, for at least 3 months as complement to treatment (12-step program or hospital-based outpatient care). A thematic analysis with an inductive approach was used to identify, analyze, and interpret patterns within data.

Results: In all, 12 interviews were conducted with 8 men and 4 women. Participants were generally enthusiastic about the CPDB and found it convenient and useful, even though it created a need for privacy when using the device. Although technical problems were substantial, participants were tolerant to those. The system was perceived to support self-control and to restore relations, but did not replace the need for close contact with caregivers. Self-motivation to change drinking habits was essential, and could not be reached by solely using the CPDB.

Conclusions: Participants perceived the CPDB as a convenient and useful tool that was supportive under the circumstances that it was used in a context that included personal contact with a caregiver; and the user felt more than just a minimum of motivation to reduce drinking. Technical stability needs to be achieved to secure long-term use.

Keywords
alcohol treatment, cellular photo digital breathalyzers, motivation, patients' experiences, qualitative, remote BAC monitoring
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351090 (URN)10.1097/ADM.0000000000000373 (DOI)000427987500004 ()29176448 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Hammarberg, A., Öster, C. & Nehlin, C. (2017). Drinking motives of adult patients seeking treatment for problematic alcohol use. Journal of Addictive Diseases, 36(2), 127-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drinking motives of adult patients seeking treatment for problematic alcohol use
2017 (English)In: Journal of Addictive Diseases, ISSN 1055-0887, E-ISSN 1545-0848, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Drinking Motives Questionnaire measures motives for alcohol consumption on four subscales. Coping with negative affect and enhancement of positive affect have been shown to be associated with high levels of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. Few studies exist concerning drinking motives among treatment-seeking patients. The aims of the study were to investigate the factor structure of the shortened-form of the revised Drinking Motives Questionnaire, map main drinking motives, explore group differences in motives due to sex, age, level of drinking problems, and symptoms of depression/anxiety and to investigate whether different drinking motives predict alcohol-related problems in this group. There were 274 treatment-seeking patients recruited from four addiction treatment clinics in Sweden. The shortened-form of the revised Drinking Motives Questionnaire was administered in conjunction with a regular visit to the clinics together with measures of degree of alcohol-related problems, psychiatric symptoms, and demographic factors. Main drinking motives were identified. A confirmatory factor analysis was run to confirm the factor structure of the shortened-form of the revised Drinking Motives Questionnaire. A logistic regression using the Enter method was performed to investigate associations between predictors and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test scores. The results confirmed the four-factor structure reported in studies on non-treatment-seeking individuals. Coping was the most commonly expressed motive. Not previously found in a clinical sample, the results showed that coping motives, together with being male and having elevated anxiety scores, were associated to Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test scores indicative of alcohol dependence. The shortened-form of the revised Drinking Motives Questionnaire is a brief and valid instrument that holds potential for clinical use in mapping drinking motives among treatment seekers.

Keywords
DMQ-R-SF, Motives for drinking, alcohol dependence, coping, treatment seekers
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321377 (URN)10.1080/10550887.2017.1291052 (DOI)000399659500005 ()28166486 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved
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