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Benedict, Christian, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/000-0002-8911-4068
Publications (10 of 112) Show all publications
Titova, O. E., Lindberg, E., Tan, X., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2020). Association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults.. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 111, Article ID 104472.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults.
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2020 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 111, article id 104472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Executive function is defined as a set of cognitive skills that are necessary to plan, monitor, and execute a sequence of goal-directed complex actions. Executive function is influenced by a variety of factors, including habitual sleep duration and diabetes. In the present study, we investigated in 18,769 Swedish adults (mean age: 61 y) the association between executive function, diabetes, and self-reported sleep duration. We observed a significant interaction between diabetes and sleep duration for the Trail Making Test (TMT) ratio (P < 0.01). This ratio is a measure of executive function where higher values indicate worse performance. Among diabetic participants (n = 1,523), long (defined as ≥9 h per day) vs. normal sleep duration (defined as 7-8 hours per day) was associated with a higher TMT ratio (P < 0.05). Similar significant results were observed in diabetic individuals without pharmacological treatment for diabetes (n = 1,062). Among non-diabetic participants (n = 17,246), no association between long sleep duration and the TMT ratio was observed (P > 0.05). Instead, short (defined as <7 h per day) vs. normal sleep duration was linked to a higher TMT ratio (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults. Based on the cross-sectional design of the study, no firm conclusions can be drawn on the causality of the relations.

Keywords
Cohort study, Diabetes, Executive function, Sleep duration
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401482 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2019.104472 (DOI)000503085600005 ()31610410 (PubMedID)
Funder
Novo Nordisk, NNF190C0056777The Swedish Brain Foundation, F02019-0028Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Åke Wiberg Foundation, M18-0169Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2018-00365Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF), P18-0084
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., van Egmond, L., Partinen, M., Lange, T. & Benedict, C. (2019). A narrative review of interventions for improving sleep and reducing circadian disruption in medical inpatients. Sleep Medicine, 59, 42-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A narrative review of interventions for improving sleep and reducing circadian disruption in medical inpatients
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2019 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 59, p. 42-50Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sleep and circadian disruptions are frequently observed in patients across hospital wards. This is alarming, since impaired nocturnal sleep and disruption of a normal circadian rhythm can compromise health and disturb processes involved in recovery from illness (eg, immune functions). With this in mind, the present narrative review discusses how patient characteristics (sleep disorders, anxiety, stress, chronotype, and disease), hospital routines (pain management, timing of medication, nocturnal vital sign monitoring, and physical inactivity), and hospital environment (light and noise) may all contribute to sleep disturbances and circadian misalignment in patients. We also propose hospital-based strategies that may help reduce sleep and circadian disruptions in patients admitted to the hospital. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2019
Keywords
Sleep, Circadian rhythm, Hospital, Inpatients
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390001 (URN)10.1016/j.sleep.2018.08.007 (DOI)000471665700006 ()30415906 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2016-009Ernfors FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Rångtell, F. H., Karamchedu, S., Andersson, P., Liethof, L., Bucaro, M. O., Lampola, L., . . . Benedict, C. (2019). A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner. Journal of Sleep Research, 28(1), Article ID e12651.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 1, article id e12651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acute sleep deprivation can lead to judgement errors and thereby increases the risk of accidents, possibly due to an impaired working memory. However, whether the adverse effects of acute sleep loss on working memory are modulated by auditory distraction in women and men are not known. Additionally, it is unknown whether sleep loss alters the way in which men and women perceive their working memory performance. Thus, 24 young adults (12 women using oral contraceptives at the time of investigation) participated in two experimental conditions: nocturnal sleep (scheduled between 22:30 and 06:30 hours) versus one night of total sleep loss. Participants were administered a digital working memory test in which eight-digit sequences were learned and retrieved in the morning after each condition. Learning of digital sequences was accompanied by either silence or auditory distraction (equal distribution among trials). After sequence retrieval, each trial ended with a question regarding how certain participants were of the correctness of their response, as a self-estimate of working memory performance. We found that sleep loss impaired objective but not self-estimated working memory performance in women. In contrast, both measures remained unaffected by sleep loss in men. Auditory distraction impaired working memory performance, without modulation by sleep loss or sex. Being unaware of cognitive limitations when sleep-deprived, as seen in our study, could lead to undesirable consequences in, for example, an occupational context. Our findings suggest that sleep-deprived young women are at particular risk for overestimating their working memory performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
sound distraction, women and men, nocturnal wakefulness, subjective performance, cognition
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376724 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12651 (DOI)000456255400005 ()29383809 (PubMedID)
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseSwedish Research Council, 2015-03100Åke Wiberg FoundationThe Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2016-0092Swedish Society of MedicineTore Nilsons Stiftelse för medicinsk forskningNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Erik, Karin och Gösta Selanders FoundationAFA Insurance, 140006Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Dyakova, O., Rångtell, F. H., Tan, X., Nordström, K. & Benedict, C. (2019). Acute sleep loss induces signs of visual discomfort in young men. Journal of Sleep Research, 28(6), Article ID e12837.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute sleep loss induces signs of visual discomfort in young men
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 6, article id e12837Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acute sleep loss influences visual processes in humans, such as recognizing facial emotions. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study till date has examined whether acute sleep loss alters visual comfort when looking at images. One image statistic that can be used to investigate the level of visual comfort experienced under visual encoding is the slope of the amplitude spectrum, also referred to as the slope constant. The slope constant describes the spatial distribution of pixel intensities and deviations from the natural slope constant can induce visual discomfort. In the present counterbalanced crossover design study, 11 young men with normal or corrected-to-normal vision participated in two experimental conditions: one night of sleep loss and one night of sleep. In the morning after each intervention, subjects performed a computerized psychophysics task. Specifically, they were required to adjust the slope constant of images depicting natural landscapes and close-ups with a randomly chosen initial slope constant until they perceived each image as most natural looking. Subjects also rated the pleasantness of each selected image. Our analysis showed that following sleep loss, higher slope constants were perceived as most natural looking when viewing images of natural landscapes. Images with a higher slope constant are generally perceived as blurrier. The selected images were also rated as less pleasant after sleep loss. No such differences between the experimental conditions were noted for images of close-ups. The results suggest that sleep loss induces signs of visual discomfort in young men. Possible implications of these findings are discussed.

Keywords
aesthetical pleasantness, amplitude spectrum, natural scene statistics, psychophysics, total sleep deprivation
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380990 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12837 (DOI)000495679200026 ()30815934 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-4740Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
van Egmond, L., Tan, X., Sjögren, P., Cederholm, T. & Benedict, C. (2019). Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study. Nutrients, 11(5), Article ID 1029.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 1029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, little is known about how dietary patterns may link to measures of sleep quality in older subjects, who often suffer from sleep problems. Here, we investigated, in an older male population from Sweden (n = 970; aged 71 +/- 1 year), whether adherence to the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI; based on recommendations from the World Health Organization) or the Mediterranean Diet (MD) is linked to sleep disturbances. The diet scores were calculated using a seven-day food diary, and self-reported sleep initiation or maintenance problems were assessed by questionnaires. When adjusted for potential confounders, no associations between dietary scores and sleep parameters were found. In contrast, low consumption of milk and dairy products one of the dietary features of the MD was associated with better subjective sleep initiation. This association was, however, not found in men with adequate reports of daily energy intake (similar to 54% of the cohort). To summarize, our findings do not suggest that older men can mitigate perceived difficulties to fall and stay asleep by adhering to either the HDI or MD. Whether low consumption of milk and dairy products can facilitate sleep initiation must be confirmed in future studies by utilizing objective measures of sleep such as polysomnography. Finally, when investigating associations between dietary patterns and sleep, particular attention should be paid to the potential confounder of inadequate reporting of energy intake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
mediterranean diet, healthy diet indicator, sleep problems, elderly population, dietary adherence
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389873 (URN)10.3390/nu11051029 (DOI)000471021600089 ()31071943 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2019-07-31 Created: 2019-07-31 Last updated: 2019-07-31Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Titova, O. E., Lindberg, E., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2019). Association Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), 15(3), 431-435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 431-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The current study sought to examine whether self-reported sleep duration is linked to an adverse body composition in 19,709 adults aged 45 to 75 years.

METHODS: All variables used in the current study were derived from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. Habitual sleep duration was measured by questionnaires. Body composition was assessed by bioimpedance. The main outcome variables were fat mass and fat-free mass (in kg). Analysis of covariance adjusting for age, sex, fat mass in the case of fat-free mass (and vice versa), leisure time physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption was used to investigate the association between sleep duration and body composition.

RESULTS: Short sleep (defined as ≤ 5 hours sleep per day) and long sleep (defined as 8 or more hours of sleep per day) were associated with lower fat-free mass and higher fat mass, compared with 6 to 7 hours of sleep duration (P< .05).

CONCLUSIONS: These observations could suggest that both habitual short and long sleep may contribute to two common clinical phenotypes in middle-aged and older humans, ie, body adiposity and sarcopenia. However, the observational nature of our study does not allow for causal interpretation.

Keywords
body fat, elderly, fat-free mass, middle-aged, sleep
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379286 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.7668 (DOI)000461417900009 ()30853046 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Ernfors FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Åke Wiberg Foundation, M18-0169Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2018-00365
Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Ciuculete, D.-M., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2019). Associations between chronotype, MTNR1B genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes in UK Biobank. Journal of Internal Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between chronotype, MTNR1B genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes in UK Biobank
2019 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective

To examine the association between the MTNR1B G risk allele, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and chronotype in the UK Biobank.

Methods

Data from the baseline investigation of the UK Biobank were utilized (n = 337 083 White British; mean age: 56.9 years; 54% women). MTNR1B rs10830963 was directly genotyped [CC (reference group), CG and GG]. Chronotype was divided into four categories: definitely morning (reference group); more morning than evening; more evening than morning; and definitely evening. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for T2D, controlling for age, sex and other confounders.

Results

Carriers of the rs10830963 risk allele had a higher risk of T2D [CG vs. CC: OR (95% CI) 1.10 (1.07, 1.15); GG vs. CC: 1.21 (1.14, 1.29)]. Compared with definitely morning chronotype, participants with definitely evening chronotype exhibited the highest risk of T2D [1.25 (1.17, 1.33)]. Despite a nonsignificant interaction between chronotype and the risk allele [0.98 (0.94, 1.01), P = 0.176 for interaction term], we found that definitely evening chronotype (vs. definitely morning) was linked with a higher risk of T2D amongst CC and CG but not GG carriers. Additionally, we saw that the GG genotype (vs. CC) was associated with a higher risk of T2D across all chronotype categories, except for definitely evening.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that the MTNR1B G risk allele and late chronotype increase the risk of T2D. The association between late chronotype and higher risk of T2D appears to vary across MTNR1B rs10830963 genotypes.

Keywords
chronotype, genetic risk, melatonin receptor 1B polymorphism, type 2 diabetes, UK Biobank
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397675 (URN)10.1111/joim.12994 (DOI)000494559800001 ()31623012 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100
Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
van Egmond, L., Ekman, M. & Benedict, C. (2019). Bed and rise times during the Age of Enlightenment: A case report. Journal of Sleep Research, 28(6), Article ID e12862.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bed and rise times during the Age of Enlightenment: A case report
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 6, article id e12862Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown that our modern electrical lighting environment reduces naturally occurring seasonal variations in sleep-wake rhythms, such as longer sleep during the winter versus summer. However, less is known about how timing and duration of sleep were affected by the seasons in the premodern era, before the invention of electrical lighting. The Swedish researcher Olof Hiorter collected and documented geophysical data every hour during wakefulness in Uppsala, Sweden, between December 1746 and November 1747. In this way, his bed and rise times could be approximated. The data revealed that Hiorter's rise times occurred around 1 hr before sunrise in winter versus 1 hr after sunrise in summer. No such association was observed between the time of sunset and Hiorter's bedtimes. Finally, the time in bed was about 3.5-4 hr shorter in summer compared to winter. This 273-year-old case report suggests that time in bed and rise times of people from the premodern era exhibited seasonal variations.

Keywords
historical case report, seasons, sleep, sunrise, sunset
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397940 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12862 (DOI)000495679200001 ()31012165 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Cook, J. D., Cedernaes, J. & Benedict, C. (2019). Consumer sleep trackers: a new tool to fight the hidden epidemic of obstructive sleep apnoea?. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, 7(12), 1012-1012
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumer sleep trackers: a new tool to fight the hidden epidemic of obstructive sleep apnoea?
2019 (English)In: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 2213-2600, E-ISSN 2213-2619, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 1012-1012Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-399970 (URN)10.1016/S2213-2600(19)30407-2 (DOI)000499062900018 ()
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Cedernaes, J., Risérus, U. & Benedict, C. (2019). Lack of association between self-reported insomnia symptoms and clamp-derived insulin sensitivity in elderly men. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 102, 256-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of association between self-reported insomnia symptoms and clamp-derived insulin sensitivity in elderly men
2019 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 102, p. 256-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insomnia-related sleep disruptions, such as short and disturbed sleep, have been tied to systemic insulin resistance in young adult populations. We therefore sought to confirm these findings in a cohort of elderly men. To this aim, we utilized variables from 980 men who participated in the investigation at age 70 of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. Self-reported insomnia symptoms were assessed by questions about difficulty initiating sleep, early final awakening, and regular use of hypnotics. All participants also underwent the gold standard hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique to assess the insulin sensitivity index (M/I). Finally, fasting blood was collected to measure free fatty acids (FFAs) and adiponectin. Differences in blood parameters between men with and those without insomnia were determined by ANCOVA, and were adjusted for lifestyle and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our analysis yielded no differences in M/I, FFAs, and adiponectin between men with and those without insomnia symptoms. Analyses in non-diabetic and diabetic subsamples confirmed these negative findings. Our cross-sectional results therefore suggest that insomnia symptoms may have a minimal effect, if any, on measures of insulin sensitivity in elderly men. Given the observational design of our study, future studies are needed to determine whether experimental sleep manipulations influence systemic insulin sensitivity in elderly humans, as has previously been shown in young adult populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2019
Keywords
Male cohort, Insomnia symptoms, Clamp-derived insulin sensitivity, Adiponectin, Free fatty acids
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382522 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.12.227 (DOI)000462800900032 ()30594818 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/000-0002-8911-4068

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