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Gingnell, Malin
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Åhs, F., Gingnell, M., Furmark, T. & Fredrikson, M. (2017). Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 261, 85-90.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder
2017 (English)In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 261, 85-90 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anxiety reduction following repeated exposure to stressful experiences is generally held to depend on neural processes involved in extinction of conditioned fear. We predicted that repeated exposure to stressful experiences would change activity throughout the circuitry serving extinction, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the hippocampus and the amygdala. To test this prediction, 36 participants diagnosed with SAD performed two successive speeches in front of an observing audience while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was recorded using positron emission tomography. To control for non-anxiolytic effects of repeated exposure, rCBF was also measured during repeated presentations of neutral and angry facial expressions. Results showed that anxiety ratings and heart rate decreased from the first to the second speech, indicating an anxiolytic effect of repeated exposure. Exposure attenuated rCBF in the amygdala whereas no change in rCBF was observed in the vmPFC or hippocampus. The rCBF-reductions in the amygdala were greater following repetition of the speech task than repetition of face exposure indicating that they were specific to anxiety attenuation and not due to a reduced novelty. Our findings suggest that amygdala-related attenuation processes are key to understanding the working mechanisms of exposure therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2017
Keyword
Extinction, Social phobia, Cognitive behavior therapy, Amygdala, Hippocampus, VmPFC
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320032 (URN)10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.01.009 (DOI)000395958900012 ()28167379 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Gingnell, M., Bannbers, E., Engman, J., Frick, A., Moby, L., Wikström, J. & Sundström-Poromaa, I. (2016). The effect of combined hormonal contraceptives use on brain reactivity during response inhibition. European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, 21(2), 150-157.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of combined hormonal contraceptives use on brain reactivity during response inhibition
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2016 (English)In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 21, no 2, 150-157 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives Cognitive control, which can be described as the ability to moderate impulses, has not previously been investigated in users of combined hormonal contraception (CHC). Given the suggested modulatory role of ovarian steroids in prefrontal dopaminergic function, which in turn taps into cognitive control, this randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled oral contraceptive trial set out to investigate the brain activity pattern during response inhibition in CHC users. Methods Thirty-four women were randomised to one treatment cycle with a levonorgestrel-containing CHC or placebo. The women performed a Go/NoGo task to measure brain activity during response inhibition by use of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to and during the CHC/placebo treatment cycle. Results No differences between CHC and placebo users in number of correct inhibitions were found during treatment, but only women on CHC significantly improved their performance between the baseline and treatment assessments. During the treatment cycle CHC users displayed decreased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus in comparison with placebo users. No other significant activations were evident between treatment groups or within groups. Conclusion Overall, CHC use had marginal effects on brain activity during response inhibition. If anything, the findings of the study may suggest reduced effort or increased efficiency in maintaining orbitofrontal cortex inhibitory cognitive control when using a combined oral contraceptive.

Keyword
Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Go/NoGo; Oestrogen; Oral contraceptives; Progestagen; Randomised clinical trial; Response inhibition
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265145 (URN)10.3109/13625187.2015.1077381 (DOI)000375025700006 ()26291330 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Engman, J., Sundström-Poromaa, I., Fredrikson, M. & Gingnell, M. (2015). Amygdala Resting State Functional Connectivity is Affected by Oral Contraceptives and Menstrual Cycle Phase. Paper presented at Oral presentation at the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland. October 2015.. Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, 28(1S), S70-S70.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amygdala Resting State Functional Connectivity is Affected by Oral Contraceptives and Menstrual Cycle Phase
2015 (English)In: Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 0968-5243, E-ISSN 1352-8661, Vol. 28, no 1S, S70-S70 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284491 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation at the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland. October 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Gingnell, M., Bannbers, E., Moes, H., Engman, J., Sylvén, S., Skalkidou, A., . . . Sundström-Poromaa, I. (2015). Emotion Reactivity Is Increased 4-6 Weeks Postpartum in Healthy Women: A Longitudinal fMRI Study. PLoS ONE, 10(6), Article ID e0128964.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion Reactivity Is Increased 4-6 Weeks Postpartum in Healthy Women: A Longitudinal fMRI Study
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, e0128964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marked endocrine alterations occur after delivery. Most women cope well with these changes, but the postpartum period is associated with an increased risk of depressive episodes. Previous studies of emotion processing have focused on maternal-infant bonding or postpartum depression (PPD), and longitudinal studies of the neural correlates of emotion processing throughout the postpartum period in healthy women are lacking. In this study, 13 women, without signs of post partum depression, underwent fMRI with an emotional face matching task and completed the MADRS-S, STAI-S, and EPDS within 48 h (early postpartum) and 4-6 weeks after delivery (late postpartum). Also, data from a previous study including 15 naturally cycling controls assessed in the luteal and follicular phase of the menstrual cycle was used. Women had lower reactivity in insula, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in the early as compared to the late postpartum assessment. Insular reactivity was positively correlated with anxiety in the early postpartum period and with depressive symptoms late postpartum. Reactivity in insula and IFG were greater in postpartum women than in non-pregnant control subjects. Brain reactivity was not correlated with serum estradiol or progesterone levels. Increased reactivity in the insula, IFG, and MFG may reflect normal postpartum adaptation, but correlation with self-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety in these otherwise healthy postpartum women, may also suggest that these changes place susceptible women at increased risk of PPD. These findings contribute to our understanding of the neurobiological aspects of the postpartum period, which might shed light on the mechanisms underlying affective puerperal disorders, such as PPD.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-258776 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0128964 (DOI)000355979500112 ()26061879 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2008-54X-200642-01-3
Available from: 2015-07-20 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Iliadis, S. I., Koulouris, P., Gingnell, M., Sylvén, S. M., Sundström-Poromaa, I., Ekselius, L., . . . Skalkidou, A. (2015). Personality and risk for postpartum depressive symptoms. Archives of Women's Mental Health, 18(3), 539-546.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality and risk for postpartum depressive symptoms
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2015 (English)In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 18, no 3, 539-546 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common childbirth complication, affecting 10-15 % of newly delivered mothers. This study aims to assess the association between personality factors and PPD. All pregnant women during the period September 2009 to September 2010, undergoing a routine ultrasound at Uppsala University Hospital, were invited to participate in the BASIC study, a prospective study designed to investigate maternal well-being. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) while the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) was used as a diagnostic tool for major depression. Personality traits were evaluated using the Swedish Universities Scale of Personality (SSP). One thousand thirty-seven non-depressed pregnant women were included in the study. Non-depressed women reporting high levels of neuroticism in late pregnancy were at high risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDSs) at 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery, even after adjustment for confounders (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-6.5 and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.9, 95 % CI 1.9-7.9). The same was true for a DSRS-based diagnosis of major depression at 6 months postpartum. Somatic trait anxiety and psychic trait anxiety were associated with increased risk for PPDS at 6 weeks (aOR = 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.5 and aOR = 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.1), while high scores of mistrust were associated with a twofold increased risk for PPDS at 6 months postpartum (aOR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.4). Non-depressed pregnant women with high neuroticism scores have an almost fourfold increased risk to develop depressive symptoms postpartum, and the association remains robust even after controlling for most known confounders. Clinically, this could be of importance for health care professionals working with pregnant and newly delivered women.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240437 (URN)10.1007/s00737-014-0478-8 (DOI)000354707100012 ()25369905 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2010-3293
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Engman, J., Frick, A., Alaie, I., Björkstrand, J., Ågren, T., Faria, V., . . . Furmark, T. (2014). Amygdala and Default Mode Network Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Social Anxiety Disorder. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Hamburg, Germany, 8-12 juni 2014. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amygdala and Default Mode Network Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Social Anxiety Disorder
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247730 (URN)
Conference
20th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Hamburg, Germany, 8-12 juni 2014
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2015-03-23
Gingnell, M., Frick, A., Marquand, A. F., Howner, K., Fischer, H., Kristiansson, M., . . . Furmark, T. (2014). Classifying social anxiety disorder using multivoxel pattern analyses of brain function and structure. In: : . Paper presented at 69th Society of Biological Psychiatry Annual Meeting, New York, New York, USA, 8-10 maj 2014. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classifying social anxiety disorder using multivoxel pattern analyses of brain function and structure
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247765 (URN)
Conference
69th Society of Biological Psychiatry Annual Meeting, New York, New York, USA, 8-10 maj 2014
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2015-03-23
Frick, A., Gingnell, M., Marquand, A. F., Howner, K., Fischer, H., Kristiansson, M., . . . Furmark, T. (2014). Classifying social anxiety disorder using multivoxel pattern analyses of brain function and structure. Behavioural Brain Research, 259, 330-335.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classifying social anxiety disorder using multivoxel pattern analyses of brain function and structure
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2014 (English)In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 259, 330-335 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Functional neuroimaging of social anxiety disorder (SAD) support altered neural activation to threat-provoking stimuli focally in the fear network, while structural differences are distributed over the temporal and frontal cortices as well as limbic structures. Previous neuroimaging studies have investigated the brain at the voxel level using mass-univariate methods which do not enable detection of more complex patterns of activity and structural alterations that may separate SAD from healthy individuals. Support vector machine (SVM) is a supervised machine learning method that capitalizes on brain activation and structural patterns to classify individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate if it is possible to discriminate SAD patients (n=14) from healthy controls (n=12) using SVM based on (1) functional magnetic resonance imaging during fearful face processing and (2) regional gray matter volume. Whole brain and region of interest (fear network) SVM analyses were performed for both modalities. For functional scans, significant classifications were obtained both at whole brain level and when restricting the analysis to the fear network while gray matter SVM analyses correctly classified participants only when using the whole brain search volume. These results support that SAD is characterized by aberrant neural activation to affective stimuli in the fear network, while disorder-related alterations in regional gray matter volume are more diffusely distributed over the whole brain. SVM may thus be useful for identifying imaging biomarkers of SAD.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213685 (URN)10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.003 (DOI)000331667700040 ()24239689 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-01-02 Created: 2014-01-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gingnell, M., Frick, A., Marquand, A. F., Howner, K., Fischer, H., Kristiansson, M., . . . Furmark, T. (2014). Classifying Social Anxiety Disorder Using Multivoxel Pattern Analyses of Brain Function and Structure. Paper presented at 69th Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry, 2014, New York, NY. Biological Psychiatry, 75(9), 358S-358S.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classifying Social Anxiety Disorder Using Multivoxel Pattern Analyses of Brain Function and Structure
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2014 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 75, no 9, 358S-358S p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Keyword
Social Anxiety Disorder, Multivoxel Pattern Analysis, Support Vector Machine, Classification, Biomarker
National Category
Neurosciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228225 (URN)000334101802257 ()
Conference
69th Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry, 2014, New York, NY
Available from: 2014-07-10 Created: 2014-07-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Toffoletto, S., Lanzenberger, R., Gingnell, M., Sundström-Poromaa, I. & Comasco, E. (2014). Emotional and cognitive functional imaging of estrogen and progesterone effects in the female human brain: A systematic review. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 50, 28-52.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional and cognitive functional imaging of estrogen and progesterone effects in the female human brain: A systematic review
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2014 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 50, 28-52 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ovarian hormones are pivotal for the physiological maintenance of the brain function as well as its response to environmental stimuli. There is mounting evidence attesting the relevance of endogenous ovarian hormones as well as exogenous estradiol and progesterone for emotional and cognitive processing. The present review systematically summarized current knowledge on sex steroid hormonal modulation of neural substrates of emotion and cognition revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-four studies of healthy naturally cycling and combined oral contraceptives (COC) user women, or women undergoing experimental manipulations, during their reproductive age, were included. Furthermore, six studies of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a hormonally based mood disorder, and three of gender dysphoria (GD), which provides an intriguing opportunity to examine the effect of high-dose cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) on brain functioning, were included. Globally, low (early follicular and the entire follicular phase for estrogen and progesterone, respectively) and high (COC, CSHT, late follicular and luteal phase for estrogen; COC, mid- and late-luteal phase for progesterone) hormonal milieu diversely affected the response of several brain regions including the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus, but their functional recruitment across groups and domains was scattered. The constellation of findings provides initial evidence of the influence of sex steroid hormones on cortical and subcortical regions implicated in emotional and cognitive processing. Further well-powered and multimodal neuroimaging studies will be needed to identify the neural mechanism of functional brain alterations induced by sex steroid hormones.

National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235754 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.07.025 (DOI)000345061000004 ()25222701 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-08 Created: 2014-11-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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