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Funkquist, Eva-LottaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0300-0618
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Cato, K., Funkquist, E.-L. & Rosenblad, A. (2024). Instrument development and an intervention to increase parents' self-efficacy regarding their infant's sleep. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 39, Article ID 100944.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instrument development and an intervention to increase parents' self-efficacy regarding their infant's sleep
2024 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 39, article id 100944Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Many Swedish parents experience that their infant has sleeping problems. Parents’ self-efficacy regarding their infants’ sleep may play an important role in how they perceive these problems. This pilot study aimed to develop an instrument measuring parents’ self-efficacy regarding their infant’s sleep and to examine if parents’ self-efficacy was affected by an intervention focusing on parental education.

Method

Mothers and fathers, at a maternity unit in Sweden, were drawn into either an intervention (n = 46) or a control (n = 42) group. The intervention group received a home visit from a nurse who provided information about infant sleep; the importance of attachment; and advice regarding sleep, breastfeeding and bed sharing, including guidelines for safe bed sharing. Three months later, the participants answered questions on background data, breastfeeding, sleep and self-efficacy.

Results

The 11-item two-factor Uppsala Parental Self-Efficacy about Infant Sleep Instrument (UPPSEISI) was constructed to measure parents’ perceived self-efficacy. In adjusted analyses, being in the intervention group was associated with a higher self-efficacy (P = 0.035), as were being a mother (P = 0.003) and being satisfied with one’s own sleep (P = 0.007), while parents’ own sleeping problems were associated with a lower self-efficacy (P = 0.015).

Conclusion

Importantly, parental education may increase parents’ self-efficacy regarding their infant’s sleep.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Breastfeeding, Parents, Psychometric analysis, Self-efficacy, Sleep
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-519319 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2023.100944 (DOI)001155033700001 ()
Funder
Gillbergska stiftelsen
Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved
Blixt, I., Axelsson, O. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2024). Partners' experiences of breastfeeding: a qualitative evaluation of a breastfeeding support intervention in Sweden. International Breastfeeding Journal, 19, Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Partners' experiences of breastfeeding: a qualitative evaluation of a breastfeeding support intervention in Sweden
2024 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 19, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The World Health Organization states that women and their families need breastfeeding support from the healthcare system. However, knowledge about the most effective way to involve the partner in breastfeeding is lacking. A qualitative evaluation can provide insight and knowledge about the partner's experiences towards a breastfeeding support intervention and thus contribute to how forthcoming breastfeeding support policies are designed. The aim of this study was to explore partners' experiences regarding breastfeeding while participating in The Breastfeeding Study.

Methods: An exploratory, longitudinal and qualitative design was used. This study was part of The Breastfeeding Study, which took place in Sweden. The intervention was performed in line with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Partners in the in the intervention group (IG) were part of a structured breastfeeding support programme. An individual breastfeeding plan was established in cooperation with the parents-to-be during pregnancy, and the plan was followed up at the child healthcare centre. A purposive sample was recruited from March to December 2021. Interviews and diary entries from IG (n = 8) and control group (CG) (n = 8) during pregnancy and 2 months after birth were analysed by content analysis, in accordance with the COREQ guidelines.

Results: Partners' experiences can be summarised under the main category of 'Striving to be part of the family and important that the family's everyday life was well-functioning'. IG partners experienced that both parents were involved and cooperated in the breastfeeding process and that guidance from healthcare professionals (HCPs) helped them to feel secure. CG partners experienced feeling excluded and not receiving support from HCPs.

Conclusion: Both parents need to be targeted in breastfeeding support policies to meet the support needs. Midwives at antenatal care and child healthcare nurses at the child healthcare centre have important roles to play in providing structured breastfeeding support and a breastfeeding plan. Both IG and CG partners strived to become a part of the infant's life and to make family life work. Midwives should involve both parents in a reflective dialogue on how the partner can be involved, apart from just feeding the infant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Breastfeeding, Experiences, Infant, Intervention, Partner, Support, Qualitative methods
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-521791 (URN)10.1186/s13006-023-00609-6 (DOI)001145385300001 ()38238818 (PubMedID)
Funder
Uppsala University
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Blixt, I., Rosenblad, A. K., Axelsson, O. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2023). Breastfeeding training improved healthcare professional's self-efficacy to provide evidence-based breastfeeding support: A pre-post intervention study. Midwifery, 125, Article ID 103794.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding training improved healthcare professional's self-efficacy to provide evidence-based breastfeeding support: A pre-post intervention study
2023 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 125, article id 103794Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe healthcare professional's (HCP's) perceived self-efficacy in their ability to provide breastfeeding support before and after a breastfeeding training program.

DESIGN: Pre-post intervention study.

SETTING: Antenatal care and child healthcare (CHC) centres in Sweden during 2020.

PARTICIPANTS: An intervention group consisting of 39 HCPs (midwives 51.3%, child healthcare nurses 46.2%) completing a questionnaire at baseline and after intervention, and a control group of 34 HCPs (midwives 61.8%, child healthcare nurses 38.2%) completing a questionnaire at baseline.

INTERVENTION: A breastfeeding training program in line with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and WHO recommendations about breastfeeding.

MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: The 11-item Breastfeeding Support Confidence Scale (BSCS) measures HCP's self-efficacy regarding providing breastfeeding support in line with Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and WHO recommendations. The intervention group experienced a significantly increased self-efficacy from pre-intervention to post-intervention for 8 of the 11 BSCS items, with the overall BSCS index score increasing from 36.87 to 39.56 points (p = 0.001). The index score in the intervention group at follow-up was significantly higher than the corresponding score in the control group at baseline (p = 0.025). The intervention group had significantly higher scores at follow-up than the control group at baseline on the questions: "I'm sure that I can help mothers continue to breastfeed even if the infant doesn't follow the growth curve" (p = 0.026) and "I'm sure that I can help mothers continue to breastfeed when the breastfeeding is painful" (p = 0.048).

KEY CONCLUSIONS: The breastfeeding training program improved HCP' self-efficacy to provide evidence-based support to breastfeeding mothers.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This training program is well suited to implement in clinical practice and follows the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12623000648628.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Breastfeeding, Healthcare professionals, Intervention study, Self-efficacy, Support, Training
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-513106 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2023.103794 (DOI)001071312900001 ()37660540 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-03 Created: 2023-10-03 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Lindström Nilsson, M., Engvall, G., Enskär, K., Edner, A. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2023). Children's interaction with a dog when having Animal Assisted Activity in paediatric hospital care. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 53, Article ID 101807.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's interaction with a dog when having Animal Assisted Activity in paediatric hospital care
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2023 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 53, article id 101807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to investigate the interaction process between child and dog and how it possibly affects children's wellbeing during Animal Assisted Activity.

Children have reported negative feelings such as fear and anxiety when being cared for in hospital and various kinds of complementary treatment can alleviate this. Different complementary treatments, including interaction with a dog, can create positive emotions and the treatment has been reported to have both physiological and psychological beneficial effects. However, there is a lack of studies describing children's interaction with a dog.

This is an observational study, analysed from field notes with qualitative content analysis using a deductive approach. Children (n = 49) aged 3–18 years of age at a paediatric hospital voluntarily participated in the study.

The results are reported on a six-level scale that describes the child-dog interaction: 1. Passive interaction, 2. One-way non-spoken communication, 3. Facilitating the interaction, 4. Interaction by activity encouragement, 5. Interaction initiated by the child, and 6. Interaction through deepened interplay. All children attained level five. Eighty-nine per cent attained level six and these children interacted fully, having a two-way deepened interplay with the dog. Further, when the interaction proceeded to a deepened interplay this affected the children positively both physically and emotionally.

Structured Animal Assisted Activity with a dog that includes an introduction, an active part and a relaxing part is a suitable model to offer children in paediatric hospital care since the children attained a child-initiated interaction or interaction through deepened interplay.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Child, Animal Assisted Activity, Interaction, Complementary treatment, Hospitalisation, Therapy dog
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-516766 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2023.101807 (DOI)001110282600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation
Available from: 2023-11-29 Created: 2023-11-29 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Gerhardsson, E., Oras, P., Mattsson, E., Thernström Blomqvist, Y. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2023). Health care professionals report positive experience with a breastfeeding training program based on the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Intensive Care. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, 29(1), 75-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health care professionals report positive experience with a breastfeeding training program based on the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Intensive Care
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0893-2190, E-ISSN 1550-5073, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Support from health care professionals (HCPs) with good knowledge and positive attitudes toward breastfeeding has been associated with better breastfeeding outcomes in the mothers of preterm infants. The aim of the study was to describe HCPs' experiences of a breastfeeding training program. A total of 48 specialist registered nurses, registered nurses, assistant nurses and physicians working at a neonatal intensive care unit attended a breastfeeding training program and answered a questionnaire including Likert scales and open-ended questions. The participants reported that their interest in breastfeeding had increased as a median (range) of 10 (8–10) on a 10-point scale and rated to what extent they had received new tools for breastfeeding support as a median of 10 (8–10) after training. There were no differences in the median between different professions' ratings. Qualitative content analysis of the open-ended questions resulted in two categories: Discussions of the case scenarios in the group and Knowledge regarding breastfeeding. The results showed that discussions based on breastfeeding scenarios were perceived as valuable; the health care professionals reported receiving new knowledge and useful practical skills. This program was shown to increase health care professionals’ interest in breastfeeding and is useful for different health care professions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
attitudes, Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Intensive Care, breastfeeding support, healthcare staff, mother, preterm infant, training program
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408018 (URN)10.1016/j.jnn.2022.02.008 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-04-02 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Stern, J., Funkquist, E.-L. & Grandahl, M. (2023). The association between early introduction of tiny tastings of solid foods and duration of breastfeeding. International Breastfeeding Journal, 18, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between early introduction of tiny tastings of solid foods and duration of breastfeeding
2023 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 18, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Conflicting advice and non-evidence-based recommendations have a negative effect on breastfeeding. Since 2011, the National Food Agency in Sweden has informed parents that they can introduce tiny tastings (1 mL of solid food, i.e. other sources of nutrition than breastmilk/formula) to infants from four months of age. It is unknown how national recommendations, which differ from the Word Health Organisation's recommendation, affect breastfeeding. We hypothesised that introduction of tiny tastings of solid foods would shorten the duration of continued breastfeeding.

Methods: This retrospective study utilises data from the longitudinal 'Swedish Pregnancy Planning Study', in which mothers were recruited at antenatal clinics on a national level. The participants completed three questionnaires up to one year after birth (n = 1,251). Linear regression models were used to analyse the association between the introduction of solid foods and the duration of breastfeeding.

Results: As hypothesised, introduction of tiny tastings shortened the duration of continued breastfeeding. Half of all infants (48%) were fed with tiny tastings already in the fourth month. The correlation analysis showed that the earlier the infants started with tiny tastings, the earlier they ate larger amounts of solid food. In a multivariate linear regression analysis, five factors were identified as having a negative effect on the duration of breastfeeding: low infant age upon introduction of tiny tastings, low maternal age, low level of maternal education, high maternal BMI and twin birth.

Conclusions: Early introduction of tiny tastings of solid foods shortened the duration of breastfeeding. It is difficult to influence most conditions that affect breastfeeding, for example, the mother's educational level, BMI, age and if she has given birth to twins. In contrast, national guidelines can always be updated. Recommendations from the Swedish authorities should adhere to the WHO's recommendation, which states exclusive breastfeeding for six months and continued breastfeeding for at least two years or longer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Breastfeeding, duration, exclusive, Infant, Mother, Solid foods
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-496580 (URN)10.1186/s13006-023-00544-6 (DOI)000913665100001 ()36647140 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Dykes, C., Hellman, C., Funkquist, E.-L. & Bramhagen, A.-C. (2022). Parents experience a sense of guilt when their newborn is diagnosed small for gestational age, SGA. A grounded theory study in Sweden. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 62, e8-e15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents experience a sense of guilt when their newborn is diagnosed small for gestational age, SGA. A grounded theory study in Sweden
2022 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 62, p. e8-e15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To become a parent of a child who is born small for gestational age can lead to challenges in addition to the newly acquired parenting role. There is currently a lack of knowledge regarding parents' experiences of having a child born small for gestational age.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of becoming a parent of a child small for gestational age

Design and method: A qualitative inductive approach was chosen with grounded theory as a method, a strategic selection was used and individual interviews with open questions were performed.

Results: The results showed that the parents expressed guilt over the child's size and focused on the ability to nourish their child to keep their unexpectedly small child alive. An experienced concern about the child's food intake could be seen throughout the entire interview material and the need for information was great. A common experience of the parents was that constant feeding of the child dominates their lives.

Conclusion: The conclusion is that the unexpectedly small size of the child awakens the parent's instinct to provide life-sustaining care and the parents need increased support and more information around the child's condition. This requires well-trained professionals, because parents to children born SGA often harbour feelings of unpreparedness and guilt.

Practice implications: Increased understanding and knowledge about the parents' experience of having a child born SGA, healthcare services can optimize the potential for better attachment between parent and child as well as offer appropriate support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2022
National Category
Clinical Medicine Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-468351 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2021.06.017 (DOI)000793561700001 ()
Available from: 2022-02-23 Created: 2022-02-23 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Rosenblad, A. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2022). Self-efficacy in breastfeeding predicts how mothers perceive their preterm infant's state-regulation. International Breastfeeding Journal, 17(1), Article ID 44.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-efficacy in breastfeeding predicts how mothers perceive their preterm infant's state-regulation
2022 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Mothers of preterm infants often perceive the infant as having problems with crying, sleeping and feeding, sometimes summarised as ‘state-regulation’. Breastfeeding rates are lower among preterm infants, and the mother’s self-efficacy in breastfeeding is central to understanding which mothers are going to breastfeed their infants. We have previously shown that mothers with higher self-efficacy have an easier time adapting to the infant and in this study we hypothesised that the degree of self-efficacy also is associated with how difficult the mother believes it is to take care of the infant. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the late preterm infant’s mother’s self-efficacy in breastfeeding was associated with how the mother experienced her infant’s state-regulation at three months of corrected age.

Methods

The study had a prospective and longitudinal design with a consecutive data collection through questionnaires. Inclusion criteria were mothers (n = 105) with a singleton infant born between 34 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks of gestation. At term age, the mothers completed the Breastfeeding Self-efficacy Scale-Short Form and at the three months corrected age follow-up, mothers completed the Infant state-regulation index: questions related to whether the infant had difficulties with colic, persistent crying, comforting, falling asleep, sleep problems, breastfeeding, eating or poor weight gain.

Results

The analyses showed that being an older mother, perceiving breastfeeding support, and having a higher breastfeeding self-efficacy were all significantly associated with identifying the infant as having better state-regulation.

Conclusions

There was an association between mothers’ self-efficacy in breastfeeding and her perceptions of how good state-regulation the infant had. This is an important finding, as self-efficacy is a manageable factor that could positively affect how the mother perceives taking care of her infant. Clinical implication: Improved self-efficacy is known to be an important factor in increased breastfeeding prevalence and healthcare professionals should also target mother’s self-efficacy in breastfeeding to improve mother-infant relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC)BMC, 2022
Keywords
Breastfeeding, Infant, Mothers, Neonatal, Premature, Self-efficacy, State-regulation, Support
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-478619 (URN)10.1186/s13006-022-00486-5 (DOI)000810288800001 ()35690825 (PubMedID)
Funder
Uppsala UniversityGillbergska stiftelsen
Available from: 2022-06-30 Created: 2022-06-30 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Gerhardsson, E., Oras, P., Mattsson, E., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Funkquist, E.-L. & Rosenblad, A. (2021). Developing the Preterm Breastfeeding Attitudes Instrument: a tool for describing attitudes to breastfeeding among health care professionals in neonatal intensive car. Midwifery, 94, Article ID 102919.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing the Preterm Breastfeeding Attitudes Instrument: a tool for describing attitudes to breastfeeding among health care professionals in neonatal intensive car
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2021 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 94, article id 102919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop an instrument that measures health care professionals' (HCPs) attitudes to breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact in relation to the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative for neonatal intensive care.

Design: The study was part of a larger project aiming to revive the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding for both full-term and preterm infants. The study had a pre-test/post-test design using online questionnaires distributed by email before and after a training programme.

Setting and participants: A total of 70 specialist registered nurses, registered nurses, assistant nurses and physicians working at a Swedish neonatal intensive care unit answered 55 breastfeeding attitudes questions online before the training. The Preterm Breastfeeding Attitudes Instrument (PreBAI) consists of twelve of these 55 items/questions, selected using exploratory factor analysis.

Measurements and findings: Higher scores indicated more positive attitudes and the median total PreBAI score was 42 points (out of 48), on both the preand the post-test questionnaires, showing no significant difference. In the pre-test questionnaire, the majority of HCPs (84%) stated that they needed further breastfeeding training. They also stated that they perceived breastfeeding as very important, scoring a median of 10 (range 5-10) points on a 10-point scale. Three separate underlying dimensions were identified in the questionnaire, indicating different attitudes: Facilitating (five items), Regulating (four items), and Breastfeedingand skin-to-skin contact-friendly (three items). A positive correlation was found between how many years the HCPs had worked in neonatal care, and their PreBAI score (r(s) = 0.383, p = 0.001). Those who had previously received extra breastfeeding education scored higher on the instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
attitudes, breastfeeding, healthcare professionals, instrument, preterm infant
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408021 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2020.102919 (DOI)000615888000001 ()33422884 (PubMedID)
Funder
Gillbergska stiftelsen
Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-04-02 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Oras, P., Ljungberg, T., Hellström-Westas, L. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2020). A breastfeeding support program changed breastfeeding patterns but did not affect the mothers' self-efficacy in breastfeeding at two months. Early Human Development, 151, Article ID 105242.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A breastfeeding support program changed breastfeeding patterns but did not affect the mothers' self-efficacy in breastfeeding at two months
2020 (English)In: Early Human Development, ISSN 0378-3782, E-ISSN 1872-6232, Vol. 151, article id 105242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Even though the biological norm in humans is frequent on demand breastfeeding,sparse feeding intervals have become the cultural norm in most Western countries due to a history of on schedule breastfeeding. This discrepancy between the biological basis and the culturally driven practice continues to interfere with women’s ability to breastfeed.

Aim: Our aim was to describe breastfeeding patterns in 2-month-old infants before and after the implementation of a breastfeeding support program. A secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between breastfeeding patterns and the mother’s self-efficacy in breastfeeding.

Methods: The study had a baseline/intervention design and was part of a larger project aiming to revive the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding program. The larger project included breastfeeding training for health care professionals and provision of breastfeeding information to parents, including information about on demand breastfeeding. Data were gathered viabreastfeeding diaries (n=79 mothers from each group) and the Breastfeeding Self-efficacy Scale–Short Form (n=83 in the baseline group and n=79 in the intervention group).

Results: On demand breastfeeding patterns were more common in the intervention group (97.5%) than in the baseline group (74.7%) (p<0.001), and breastfeeding sessions were more frequent in the intervention group (a median of 14 times per 24 hours versus 11 times in the baseline group; p=0.026). Self-efficacy in breastfeeding did not differ between the groups, but was higher in mothers with exclusive breastfeeding.

Conclusions: Knowledge about infants’ breastfeeding behavior can strengthen on demand breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding is associated with higher self-efficacy.

Keywords
human milk, infant feeding patterns, lactation management, mother-infant dyad
National Category
Pediatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-421576 (URN)10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2020.105242 (DOI)000595858500002 ()33137580 (PubMedID)
Funder
Gillbergska stiftelsen
Available from: 2020-10-09 Created: 2020-10-09 Last updated: 2021-02-12Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0300-0618

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