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Luo, J., Engqvist, H. & Persson, C. (2018). A ready-to-use acidic, brushite-forming calcium phosphate cement. Acta Biomaterialia, 81, 304-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A ready-to-use acidic, brushite-forming calcium phosphate cement
2018 (English)In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 81, p. 304-314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Premixed calcium phosphate cements have been developed to simplify the usage of traditional calcium phosphate cements and reduce the influence of the setting reaction on the delivery process. However, difficulties in achieving a good cohesion, adequate shelf life and sufficient mechanical properties have so far impeded their use in clinical applications, especially for the more degradable acidic calcium phosphate cements. In this study, a brushite cement was developed from a series of ready-to-use calcium phosphate pastes. The brushite cement paste was formed via mixing of a monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) paste and a beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) paste with good injectability and adequate shelf life. The MCPM paste was based on a water-immiscible liquid with two surfactants and the beta-Tcp paste on a sodium hyaluronate aqueous solution. The effect of citric acid as a retardant was assessed. Formulations with suitable amounts of citric acid showed good cohesion and mechanical performance with potential for future clinical applications. Statement of Significance Acidic calcium phosphate cements have attracted extensive attention as bone substitute materials due to their ability to resorb faster than basic calcium phosphate cements in vivo. However, traditionally, short working times and low mechanical strength have limited their clinical application. Premixed cements could simplify the clinical use as well as improve property reproducibility, but short shelf lives, low cohesion and low mechanical properties have restricted the development. In this study, an injectable ready-to-use two-phase system consisting of an MCPM paste and a beta-TCP paste was developed based on acidic cement. It shows good cohesion, compressive strength and adequate shelf life, which has the potential to be used in a dual chamber system for simplified and fast filling of bone defects in a minimally invasive manner. This will reduce surgery time, decrease the risk of contamination and ensure repeatable results.

Keywords
Ready-to-use, Acidic calcium phosphate cement, Brushite, Cohesion, Injectability, Shelf life
National Category
Ceramics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372719 (URN)10.1016/j.actbio.2018.10.001 (DOI)000451937500024 ()30291976 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Skjöldebrand, C., Hulsart Billström, G., Engqvist, H. & Persson, C. (2018). Biocompatibility of co-sputtered Si-Fe-C-N coatings. In: : . Paper presented at 11th annual meeting, Scandinavian Society for Biomaterials, Gullmarsstrand, 25-27 April, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biocompatibility of co-sputtered Si-Fe-C-N coatings
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Hip joint arthroplasty is a common and increasingly frequent procedure that can relieve pain and restore mobility for individuals with e.g. severe osteoarthritis. While the procedure is common and to a large extent considered successful there is a need to prolong the lifespan of the implants to meet the need of a more active patient group, living longer. One of the main limiting factors behind the implant lifetime is the generation of particulate and ionic wear debris that causes an activation of the immune system. This debris originates in the articulating surfaces and one attempt to minimize the generation of debris is to deposit a ceramic coating on metal implant parts. The hard ceramic coatings, such as silicon nitride, could improve the wear resistance as well as act as a barrier for metal ion release.1,2 The silicon nitride coatings in this study were co-deposited with Fe and C in order to increase the deposition rate and tune the dissolution rate.

METHODS: The coatings were deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering onto silicon wafer substrates. The Si target (99.99% purity) was powered with pulsed DC at 200 W, 200 kHz and 2 µs. The Fe target (99.99% purity) and C target (99.99% purity) were powered by DC aggregates at 25 W and 65 W respectively. The targets were positioned at an angle (38.81˚) and no rotation was used during deposition. Nitrogen was introduced as a reactive gas in addition to the inert Ar at a ratio of 0.3. The deposition time was 10 000 s.

Based on the intended compositional gradients five points (4 corners in a square spaced 40 mm apart and the middle) on the sample were selected. No two points on the sample are identical and could be treated like individual samples.

The composition was determined using ERDA and the surface properties were estimated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in non-contact mode.

The biocompatibility was assessed in vitro with osteo-progenitor cells from mouse (MC3T3)..

RESULTS: The ERDA investigation revealed clear compositional gradients. The Si content ranged from 26 at.% in point 4 to 34 at.% in point 1. The Fe content changed in a complementary manner with a maximum of 20 at.% in point 4 and a minimum of 10 at.% in point 1. The carbon content ranged from 8 at.% in point 1 to 14 in point 4. In addition to the expected gradients the N content ranged from 40 at.% to 47 at.%.

Despite the differences in composition the surface appearance and roughness remained similar for all the points (1-5) (Figure 1).

The cell study showed surviving cells that adhered to the Si-N-Fe-C surface for all five points.

DISCUSSION & CONCLUSIONS: Co-sputtering yielded compositional gradients along the silicon wafer. The unexpected gradient of N-content – N was present as a gas - is likely due to the ability of Si to form nitrides as seen from the low enthalpy of formation for Si3N4 (-743 kJ/mol). The low surface roughness is likely a consequence of the smooth Si-wafer substrate, it is however reasonable to assume that a polished metal substrate would also yield low surface roughness. The adhesion of the cells indicates biocompatibility. In summary the low surface roughness combined with the biocompatibility make the coatings interesting for further investigations.

 

REFERENCES

1.  Pettersson, M. et al. (2016) Mater. Sci. Eng. C. Mater. Biol. Appl. 62, 497–505 .

2.  Pettersson, M. et al. (2013) J. Mech. Behav. Biomed. Mater. 25, 41–7.

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the LifeLongJoints Project, Grant Agreement no. GA-310477.

National Category
Medical Materials Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367366 (URN)
Conference
11th annual meeting, Scandinavian Society for Biomaterials, Gullmarsstrand, 25-27 April, 2018
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, GA-310477
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-12-05
Skjöldebrand, C., Hulsart Billström, G., Engqvist, H. & Persson, C. (2018). Combinatorial coating development of Si-N-Fe-C coatings for joint implants. In: : . Paper presented at 29th Annual Congress of the European Society for Biomaterials, Masstricht, 11-13 April, 2018. Maastricht
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combinatorial coating development of Si-N-Fe-C coatings for joint implants
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION

Joint replacements of hip and knee are generally considered successful procedures, with a survival rate of approximately 95% after 10 years. However, the increasing, more active elderly population puts higher demands on implants, which need to last longer. Some of the main limiting factors for the longevity of these implants are the generation of wear debris and release of metal ions. These wear particles and ion release could be reduced with the use of ceramic coatings e.g. silicon nitride. Silicon nitride coatings have in laboratory investigations been shown to reduce the wear rate1 and act as a barrier for metal ions and therefore warrant further investigation for use in joint implants. An addition of the biocompatible elements Fe and C could be used to tune the dissolution rate and increase the deposition rate.

METHODS

Coatings were deposited on silicon wafer substrates using magnetron co-sputtering. The targets used were Si (99.99%purity) powered by a pulsed DC aggregate at 200 W, 200 kHz and 2µs. The two other targets C and Fe were powered by DC aggregates at 65 W and 25 W respectively. During deposition N2 was introduced as reactive gas. Elemental gradients were obtained by angling of the targets and the use of no rotation.

The coatings were investigated using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation in five different points on the sample. The different points were chosen at coordinates (0,0), (0,40), (40,0), (40,40) and (20,20) based on a coordinate system with origin in the lower left corner.

The cytotoxicity of the coatings was evaluated in vitro with mouse osteoprogenitor cells (MC3T3).

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Figure 1: Si, Fe, N and C composition over the substrate.

Clear elemental gradients could be obtained with 26 wt.% < Si < 34 wt.%, 10 wt.% < Fe < 20 wt.%, 8 wt.% < C < 14 wt.% and 40 wt.% < N < 47 wt.% (figure 1). The coatings appeared dense in SEM surface analysis, with a smooth surface for all investigated points (Ra ~ 2 nm, AFM). The cross-sectional morphology was slightly columnar with broader columns for higher Fe content. The modulus (202 GPa < M < 221 GPa) correlated positively to the Si content and negatively to the Fe content while for the hardness (14 GPa < H < 18 GPa) no statistically significant correlations were found.  This can be compared to earlier coatings, only containing Si and N, which have showed a Young’s modulus of 170-240 GPa and a hardness of 12-26 GPa2, as well as the currently used metals such as CoCrMo, showing a Young’s modulus of 293 GPa and a hardness of 6 GPa2 .

The in vitro evaluation indicated biocompatibility with viable cells that adhered and spread across the surface.

CONCLUSIONS

Si-N-Fe-C coatings show promise for applications exposed to wear with their low surface roughness, high hardness, high modulus and biocompatibility. These combined merit further investigations into the suitability of Si-N-Fe-C coatings for joint implants.

REFERENCES

1.           Pettersson, M. et al. Mechanical and tribological behavior of silicon nitride and silicon carbon nitride coatings for total joint replacements. J. Mech. Behav. Biomed. Mater. 25, 41–7 (2013).

2.           Skjöldebrand, C. et al. Influence of substrate heating and nitrogen flow on the composition, morphological and mechanical properties of SiNx coatings aimed for joint replacements. Materials (Basel). 10, 1–11 (2017).

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the LifeLongJoints Project, Grant Agreement no. GA-310477.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maastricht: , 2018
National Category
Medical Materials Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367364 (URN)
Conference
29th Annual Congress of the European Society for Biomaterials, Masstricht, 11-13 April, 2018
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, GA-310477
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-12-05
Skjöldebrand, C., Engqvist, H. & Persson, C. (2018). Compositional Dependence Of Hardness And Modulus Of Sinfec Coatings. In: P. R. Fernandes and J. M. Tavares (Ed.), 15th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and 3rd Conference on Imaging and Visualization, Lisbon, Portugal 26-29 March, 2018: . Paper presented at 15th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and 3rd Conference on Imaging and Visualization, Lisbon, Portugal, 26-29 March, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compositional Dependence Of Hardness And Modulus Of Sinfec Coatings
2018 (English)In: 15th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and 3rd Conference on Imaging and Visualization, Lisbon, Portugal 26-29 March, 2018 / [ed] P. R. Fernandes and J. M. Tavares, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology Medical Materials Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367358 (URN)
Conference
15th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and 3rd Conference on Imaging and Visualization, Lisbon, Portugal, 26-29 March, 2018
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, GA-310477
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Robo, C., Öhman, C. & Persson, C. (2018). Compressive fatigue properties of commercially available standard and low-modulus acrylic bone cements intended for vertebroplasty. Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 82, 70-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compressive fatigue properties of commercially available standard and low-modulus acrylic bone cements intended for vertebroplasty
2018 (English)In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 82, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vertebroplasty (VP) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure commonly used to relieve severe back pain associated with vertebral compression fractures. The poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement used during this procedure is however presumed to facilitate the occurrence of additional fractures next to the treated vertebrae. A reason for this is believed to be the difference in stiffness between the bone cement and the surrounding trabecular bone. The use of bone cements with lower mechanical properties could therefore reduce the risk of complications post-surgery. While intensive research has been performed on the quasi-static mechanical properties of these cements, there is no data on their long-term mechanical properties. In the present study, the in vitrocompressive fatigue performance as well as quasi-static mechanical properties of two commercially available acrylic bone cements - a low-modulus cement (Resilience®) and a standard cement (F20) from the same manufacturer - were determined. The quasi-static mechanical properties of the low-modulus and standard cements after 24h of setting were in the range of other vertebroplastic cements (σ=70-75 MPa; E=1600-1900 MPa). F20 displayed similar mechanical properties over time in 37˚C phosphate buffered saline solution, while the mechanical properties of the Resilience®cement decreased gradually due to an increased porosity in the polymeric matrix. The standard cement exhibited a fatigue limit of approx. 47 MPa, whereas the low-modulus cement showed a fatigue limit of approx. 31 MPa. 

In summary, the low-modulus bone cement had a lower fatigue limit than the standard cement, as expected. However, this fatigue limit is still substantially higher than the stresses experienced by vertebral trabecular bone.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Acrylic bone cement, low-modulus, elastic modulus, compression, fatigue, vertebroplasty
National Category
Other Materials Engineering Biomaterials Science Medical Materials
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349032 (URN)10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.03.001 (DOI)000432508800009 ()
Funder
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, FOA13H-141
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-12-05
van Dijk, N. P., Wu, D., Persson, C. & Isaksson, P. (2018). Digital Volume Correlation using Quartic FEM Interpolation and Global Optimization. In: : . Paper presented at 6th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM 6), 11-15 June, Glasgow, UK. Glasgow, UK
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Volume Correlation using Quartic FEM Interpolation and Global Optimization
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Estimating deformation fields at the microscale of trabecular bone remains challenging because of 1) the complex porous structure, and 2) the large subdomains necessary for reasonable accuracy.

In this contribution we present a novel Digital Volume Correlation method (DVC) based on a displacements-field interpolation with quartic finite elements, also called 27-node bricks, and a global optimization procedure. This particular choice of interpolation provides for increased freedom of the displacement field in each subvolume and is convenient for overlapping subvolumes for robust solutions.

The global optimization maximizes the normalized correlation for all subvolumes using the nodal degrees of freedom of the displacement interpolation as design variables and a spline interpolation of the grayscale values. A good starting point for the global optimization procedure is obtained using an initial FFT-based DVC step. This procedure can be executed without any regularization yielding decent results. The results can be improved by adding curvature penalization, similar to the work of Barber and Hose [1].

The approach has been tested on a number of different benchmark problems using bone samples. For duplicate scans, the accuracy and precision of the proposed DVC technique is comparable to ShIRT-FE as reported by Palanca et al. [2]. Tests on scans of human trabecular bone, taken at the Paul Scherrer Institut, including imposed and actual deformation are ongoing. In Figure 1, the results of such a test is shown using an imposed Gaussian displacement field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Glasgow, UK: , 2018
Keywords
DVC, FEM interpolation, Global optimization, Trabecular bone
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367370 (URN)
Conference
6th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM 6), 11-15 June, Glasgow, UK
Note

REFERENCES

[1] Barber, D. and Hose, D. (2005). Automatic segmentation of medical images using image registration: diagnostic and simulation applications. J Med Eng Technol, 29(2):53–63.

[2] Palanca, M., Tozzi, G., Cristofolini, L., Viceconti, M., and Dall’Ara, E. (2015). Threedimensional local measurements of bone strain and displacement: comparison of three digital volume correlation approaches. J Biomech Eng, 137(7):071006.

Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Lewin, S., Gallinetti, S., Kihlström, L., Persson, C., Birgersson, U. & Öhman, C. (2018). Evaluation of bioactive cranial implants: preliminary results from volumetric quantifications using computed tomography (CT). In: : . Paper presented at 8th World Congress of Biomechanics, 2018 Dublin.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of bioactive cranial implants: preliminary results from volumetric quantifications using computed tomography (CT)
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology Medical Materials
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368419 (URN)
Conference
8th World Congress of Biomechanics, 2018 Dublin
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-11
Ajaxon, I., Holmberg, A., Öhman, C. & Persson, C. (2018). Fatigue performance of a high-strength, degradable calcium phosphate bone cement. Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 79, 46-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatigue performance of a high-strength, degradable calcium phosphate bone cement
2018 (English)In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 79, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are clinically used as injectable materials to fill bone voids and to improve hardware fixation in fracture surgery. In vivo they are dynamically loaded; nonetheless little is known about their fatigue properties. The aim of this study was to, for the first time, investigate the fatigue performance of a high strength, degradable (brushitic) CPC, and also evaluate the effect of cement porosity (by varying the liquid to powder ratio, L/P) and the environment (air at room temperature or in a phosphate buffered saline solution, PBS, at 37 degrees C) on the fatigue life. At a maximum compressive stress level of 15 MPa, the cements prepared with an L/P-ratio of 0.22 and 0.28 ml/g, corresponding to porosities of approximately 12% and 20%, had a 100% probability of survival until run-out of 5 million cycles, in air. When the maximum stress level, or the L/P-ratio, was increased, the probability of survival decreased. Testing in PBS at 37 degrees C led to more rapid failure of the specimens. However, the high-strength cement had a 100% probability of survival up to approximately 2.5 million cycles at a maximum compressive stress level of 10 MPa in PBS, which is substantially higher than some in vivo stress levels, e.g., those found in the spine. At 5 MPa in PBS, all specimens survived to run-out. The results found herein are important if clinical use of the material is to increase, as characterisation of the fatigue performance of CPCs is largely lacking from the literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Bone cement, Calcium phosphate, Brushite, Fatigue, Compression, Porosity, Mechanical properties
National Category
Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347539 (URN)10.1016/j.jmbbm.2017.12.005 (DOI)000425072300006 ()29272812 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-6258
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Díez-Escudero, A., Montserrat, E., Bonany, M., Lu, X., Persson, C. & Ginebra, M.-P. (2018). Heparinization of Beta Tricalcium Phosphate: Osteo-immunomodulatory Effects. Advanced Healthcare Materials, 7(5), Article ID 1700867.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heparinization of Beta Tricalcium Phosphate: Osteo-immunomodulatory Effects
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, ISSN 2192-2640, E-ISSN 2192-2659, Vol. 7, no 5, article id 1700867Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immune cells play a vital role in regulating bone dynamics. This has boosted the interest in developing biomaterials that can modulate both the immune and skeletal systems. In this study, calcium phosphates discs (i.e., beta-tricalcium phosphate, β-TCP) are functionalized with heparin to investigate the effects on immune and stem cell responses. The results show that the functionalized surfaces downregulate the release of hydrogen peroxide and proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta) from human monocytes and neutrophils, compared to nonfunctionalized discs. The macrophages show both elongated and round shapes on the two ceramic substrates, but the morphology of cells on heparinized β-TCP tends toward a higher elongation after 72 h. The heparinized substrates support rat mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) adhesion and proliferation, and anticipate the differentiation toward the osteoblastic lineage as compared to β-TCP and control. The coupling between the inflammatory response and osteogenesis is assessed by culturing MSCs with the macrophage supernatants. The downregulation of inflammation in contact with the heparinized substrates induces higher expression of bone-related markers by MSCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
Keywords
calcium phosphates; heparinization; inflammation; osteogenesis
National Category
Medical Materials Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340741 (URN)10.1002/adhm.201700867 (DOI)000426758500005 ()
Funder
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT), STINT-IG2011-2047
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Robo, C., Hulsart Billström, G., Nilsson, M. & Persson, C. (2018). In vivo response to a low-modulus PMMA bone cement in an ovine model. Acta Biomaterialia, 72, 362-370
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vivo response to a low-modulus PMMA bone cement in an ovine model
2018 (English)In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 72, p. 362-370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is the most commonly used material for the treatment of osteoporosis-induced vertebral compression fractures. However, its high stiffness may introduce an increased risk of adjacent vertebral fractures post-surgery. One alternative in overcoming this concern is the use of additives. This presents its own challenge in maintaining an adequate biocompatibility when modifying the base cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivobiocompatibility of linoleic acid (LA)-modified acrylic bone cement using a large animal model for the first time, in order to further advance towards clinical use. A worst-case approach was used, choosing a slow-setting base cement. The in vitro monomer release from the cements was also assessed. Additional material characterization, including mechanical tests, are summarized in Appendix A. Unmodified and LA-modified cements were injected into a total of 56 bone defects created in the femur and humerus of sheep. Histopathologic and histomorphometric analysis indicated that LA-modified cement showed a harmless tissue response similar to that of the unmodified cement. Adjacent bone remodeling was observed microscopically 4 weeks after implantation, suggesting a normal healing process of the bone tissues surrounding the implant. LA-modified cement exhibited lower mechanical properties, with a reduction in the elastic modulus of up to 65%. The handling properties were slightly modified without negatively affecting the injectability of the base cement. LA-modified bone cement showed good biocompatibility as well as bone compliant mechanical properties and may therefore be a promising material for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Poly (methyl methacrylate), bone cement, low-modulus, In vivo, linoleic acid
National Category
Other Materials Engineering Medical Materials Biomaterials Science
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349033 (URN)10.1016/j.actbio.2018.03.014 (DOI)000432766900031 ()29559365 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2010-02073
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-12-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6663-6536

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