uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Sumpter, David J. T.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Szorkovszky, A., Kotrschal, A., Herbert Read, J. E., Sumpter, D. J. T., Kolm, N. & Pelckmans, K. (2017). An efficient method for sorting and quantifying individual social traits based on group-level behaviour. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An efficient method for sorting and quantifying individual social traits based on group-level behaviour
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2041-210X, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology Control Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330520 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12813 (DOI)
Projects
Linking social behaviour to the brain
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 102 2013.0072
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Romenskyy, M., Herbert-Read, J. E., Ward, A. J. W. & Sumpter, D. J. T. (2017). Body size affects the strength of social interactions and spatial organization of a schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer). Royal Society Open Science, 4(4), Article ID 161056.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body size affects the strength of social interactions and spatial organization of a schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer)
2017 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 4, no 4, 161056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While a rich variety of self-propelled particle models propose to explain the collective motion of fish and other animals, rigorous statistical comparison between models and data remains a challenge. Plausible models should be flexible enough to capture changes in the collective behaviour of animal groups at their different developmental stages and group sizes. Here, we analyse the statistical properties of schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer) through a combination of experiments and simulations. We make novel use of a Boltzmann inversion method, usually applied in molecular dynamics, to identify the effective potential of the mean force of fish interactions. Specifically, we show that larger fish have a larger repulsion zone, but stronger attraction, resulting in greater alignment in their collective motion. We model the collective dynamics of schools using a self-propelled particle model, modified to include varying particle speed and a local repulsion rule. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the fish schools are reproduced by our model, thereby capturing a number of features of the behaviour and development of schooling fish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2017
Keyword
collective motion, interactions, statistical mechanics, fish school
National Category
Zoology Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323662 (URN)10.1098/rsos.161056 (DOI)000400527200022 ()28484622 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Herbert-Read, J. E., Rosén, E., Szorkovszky, A., Ioannou, C. C., Rogell, B., Perna, A., . . . Sumpter, D. J. T. (2017). How predation shapes the social interaction rules of shoaling fish. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 284(1861), Article ID 20171126.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How predation shapes the social interaction rules of shoaling fish
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1861, 20171126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predation is thought to shape the macroscopic properties of animal groups, making moving groups more cohesive and coordinated. Precisely how predation has shaped individuals' fine-scale social interactions in natural populations, however, is unknown. Using high-resolution tracking data of shoaling fish (Poecilia reticulata) from populations differing in natural predation pressure, we show how predation adapts individuals' social interaction rules. Fish originating from high predation environments formed larger, more cohesive, but not more polarized groups than fish from low predation environments. Using a new approach to detect the discrete points in time when individuals decide to update their movements based on the available social cues, we determine how these collective properties emerge from individuals' microscopic social interactions. We first confirm predictions that predation shapes the attraction-repulsion dynamic of these fish, reducing the critical distance at which neighbours move apart, or come back together. While we find strong evidence that fish align with their near neighbours, we do not find that predation shapes the strength or likelihood of these alignment tendencies. We also find that predation sharpens individuals' acceleration and deceleration responses, implying key perceptual and energetic differences associated with how individuals move in different predation regimes. Our results reveal how predation can shape the social interactions of individuals in groups, ultimately driving differences in groups' collective behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2017
Keyword
group living, collective motion, Poecilia reticulata, collective behaviour, interaction rules
National Category
Zoology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334852 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2017.1126 (DOI)000408662400016 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 0962-8452NERC - the Natural Environment Research Council, NE/K009370/1
Available from: 2017-11-28 Created: 2017-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Liu, Y. & Sumpter, D. (2017). Insights into resource consumption, cross-feeding, system collapse, stability and biodiversity from an artificial ecosystem. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 14(126), Article ID 20160816.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights into resource consumption, cross-feeding, system collapse, stability and biodiversity from an artificial ecosystem
2017 (English)In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 14, no 126, 20160816Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Community ecosystems at very different levels of biological organization often have similar properties. Coexistence of multiple species, cross-feeding, biodiversity and fluctuating population dynamics are just a few of the properties that arise in a range of ecological settings. Here we develop a bottom-up model of consumer-resource interactions, in the form of an artificial ecosystem ``number soup'', that reflects basic properties of many bacterial and other community ecologies. We demonstrate four key properties of the number soup model: (1) Communities self-organise so that all available resources are fully consumed; (2) Reciprocal cross-feeding is a common evolutionary outcome, which evolves in a number of stages, and many transitional species are involved; (3) The evolved ecosystems are often ``robust yet fragile'', with keystone species required to prevent the whole system from collapsing; (4) Non-equilibrium dynamics and chaotic patterns are general properties, readily generating rich biodiversity. These properties have been observed in empirical ecosystems, ranging from bacteria to rainforests. Establishing similar properties in an evolutionary model as simple as the number soup suggests that these four properties are ubiquitous features of all community ecosystems, and raises questions about how we interpret ecosystem structure in the context of natural selection.

Keyword
ecosystem evolution, consumer-resource interactions, emergence, community ecology, system-level property
National Category
Ecology Other Mathematics Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314360 (URN)10.1098/rsif.2016.0816 (DOI)000393380400009 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2017-02-01 Created: 2017-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Ward, A. J. W., Schaerf, T. M., Herbert-Read, J. E., Morrell, L., Sumpter, D. J. T. & Webster, M. M. (2017). Local interactions and global properties of wild, free-ranging stickleback shoals. Royal Society Open Science, 4(7), Article ID 170043.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local interactions and global properties of wild, free-ranging stickleback shoals
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 4, no 7, 170043Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collective motion describes the global properties of moving groups of animals and the self-organized, coordinated patterns of individual behaviour that produce them. We examined the group-level patterns and local interactions between individuals in wild, free-ranging shoals of three-spine sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. Our data reveal that the highest frequencies of near-neighbour encounters occur at between one and two body lengths from a focal fish, with the peak frequency alongside a focal individual. Fish also show the highest alignment with these laterally placed individuals, and generally with animals in front of themselves. Furthermore, fish are more closely matched in size, speed and orientation to their near neighbours than to more distant neighbours, indicating local organization within groups. Among the group-level properties reported here, we find that polarization is strongly influenced by group speed, but also the variation in speed among individuals and the nearest neighbour distances of group members. While we find no relationship between group order and group size, we do find that larger groups tend to have lower nearest neighbour distances, which in turn may be important in maintaining group order.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2017
Keyword
collective behaviour, schooling, grouping
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333406 (URN)10.1098/rsos.170043 (DOI)000406670000024 ()28791135 (PubMedID)
Funder
Australian Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-13Bibliographically approved
Nannyonga, B. & Sumpter, D. J. T. (2017). Modelling optimal allocation of resources in the context of an incurable disease. PLoS ONE, 12(3), Article ID e0172401.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling optimal allocation of resources in the context of an incurable disease
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, e0172401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nodding syndrome has affected and led to the deaths of children between the ages of 5 and 15 in Northern Uganda since 2009. There is no reliable explanation of the disease, and currently the only treatment is through a nutritional programme of vitamins, combined with medication to prevent symptoms. In the absence of a proper medical treatment, we develop a dynamic compartmental model to plan the management of the syndrome and to curb its effects. We use incidence data from 2012 and 2013 from Pader, Lamwo and Kitgum regions of Uganda to parameterize the model. The model is then used to look at how to best plan the nutritional programme in terms of first getting children on to the programme through outreach, and then making sure they remain on the programme, through follow-up. For the current outbreak of nodding disease, we estimate that about half of available resources should be put into outreach. We show how to optimize the balance between outreach and follow-up in this particular example, and provide a general methodology for allocating resources in similar situations. Given the uncertainty of parameter estimates in such situations, we perform a robustness analysis to identify the best investment strategy. Our analysis offers a way of using available data to determine the best investment strategy of controlling nodding syndrome.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318922 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0172401 (DOI)000396092400006 ()
Note

Författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2017-04-03 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Ranganathan, S., Nicolis, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. (2017). Setting development goals using stochastic, dynamical system models. Plos One, 12(2), Article ID e0171560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Setting development goals using stochastic, dynamical system models
2017 (English)In: Plos One, Vol. 12, no 2, e0171560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Millennium Development Goals (MDG) programme was an ambitious attempt to encourage a globalised solution to important but often-overlooked development problems. The programme led to wide-ranging development but it has also been criticised for unrealistic and arbitrary targets. In this paper, we show how country-specific development targets can be set using stochastic, dynamical system models built from historical data. In particular, we show that the MDG target of two-thirds reduction of child mortality from 1990 levels was infeasible for most countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the MDG targets were not ambitious enough for fast-developing countries such as Brazil and China. We suggest that model-based setting of country-specific targets is essential for the success of global development programmes such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). This approach should provide clear, quantifiable targets for policymakers.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320152 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0171560 (DOI)000395934400006 ()28241057 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, D049040
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-04-27Bibliographically approved
Spaiser, V., Ranganathan, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. J. T. (2017). The Sustainable Development Oxymoron: Quantifying and Modelling the Incompatibility of Sustainable Development Goals. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 24(6), 457-470.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Sustainable Development Oxymoron: Quantifying and Modelling the Incompatibility of Sustainable Development Goals
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 24, no 6, 457-470 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2015, the UN adopted a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to eradicate poverty, establish socioeconomic inclusion and protect the environment. Critical voices such as the International Council for Science (ICSU), however, have expressed concerns about the potential incompatibility of the SDGs, specifically the incompatibility of socio-economic development and environmental sustainability. In this paper, we test, quantify and model the alleged inconsistency of SDGs. Our analyses show which SDGs are consistent and which are conflicting. We measure the extent of inconsistency and conclude that the SDG agenda will fail as a whole if we continue with business as usual. We further explore the nature of the inconsistencies using dynamical systems models, which reveal that the focus on economic growth and consumption as a means for development underlies the inconsistency. Our models also show that there are factors which can contribute to development (health programmes, government investment) on the one hand and ecological sustainability (renewable energy) on the other, without triggering the conflict between incompatible SDGs.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320151 (URN)10.1080/13504509.2016.1235624 (DOI)000410913600001 ()
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
Vogel, D., Gautrais, J., Perna, A., Sumpter, D. J. T., Deneubourg, J.-L. & Dussutour, A. (2017). Transition from isotropic to digitated growth modulates network formation in Physarum polycephalum. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 50(1), Article ID 014002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transition from isotropic to digitated growth modulates network formation in Physarum polycephalum
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, ISSN 0022-3727, E-ISSN 1361-6463, Vol. 50, no 1, 014002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some organisms, including fungi, ants, and slime molds, explore their environment and forage by forming interconnected networks. The plasmodium of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a large unicellular amoeboid organism that grows a tubular spatial network through which nutrients, body mass, and chemical signals are transported. Individual plasmodia are capable of sophisticated behaviours such as optimizing their network connectivity and dynamics using only decentralized information processing. In this study, we used a population of plasmodia that interconnect through time to analyse the dynamical interactions between growth of individual plasmodia and global network formation. Our results showed how initial conditions, such as the distance between plasmodia, their size, or the presence and quality of food, affect the emerging network connectivity.

Keyword
transportation networks, slime molds, exploration, foraging, pattern formation
National Category
Bioinformatics (Computational Biology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311475 (URN)10.1088/1361-6463/50/1/014002 (DOI)000389050000001 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, IDCAB 220/104702003
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-28 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Lihoreau, M., Clarke, I. M., Buhl, J., Sumpter, D. J. T. & Simpson, S. J. (2016). Collective selection of food patches in Drosophila. Journal of Experimental Biology, 219(5), 668-675.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collective selection of food patches in Drosophila
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 219, no 5, 668-675 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a model organism for research on social interactions. Although recent studies have described how individuals interact on foods for nutrition and reproduction, the complex dynamics by which groups initially develop and disperse have received little attention. Here we investigated the dynamics of collective foraging decisions by D. melanogaster and their variation with group size and composition. Groups of adults and larvae facing a choice between two identical, nutritionally balanced food patches distributed themselves asymmetrically, thereby exploiting one patch more than the other. The speed of the collective decisions increased with group size, as a result of flies joining foods faster. However, smaller groups exhibited more pronounced distribution asymmetries than larger ones. Using computer simulations, we show how these non-linear phenomena can emerge from social attraction towards occupied food patches, whose effects add up or compete depending on group size. Our results open new opportunities for exploring complex dynamics of nutrient selection in simple and genetically tractable groups.

Keyword
Aggregation, Drosophila melanogaster, Collective behavior, Foraging, Fruit flies, Individual-based model, Social attraction
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282302 (URN)10.1242/jeb.127431 (DOI)000371134700015 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications