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Eriksson, Måns
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Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Fellström, B., Helmersson-Karlqvist, J., Lind, L., Soveri, I., Wu, P.-H., Thulin, M., . . . Larsson, A. (2020). Associations Between Apolipoprotein A1, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and Urinary Cytokine Levels in Elderly Males and Females. Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, 40(2), 71-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between Apolipoprotein A1, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and Urinary Cytokine Levels in Elderly Males and Females
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, ISSN 1079-9907, E-ISSN 1557-7465, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 71-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There exists a close relationship between cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. Apolipoprotein A1 and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are widely used as cardiovascular risk markers but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate any associations between HDL levels and cytokine levels in urine. We randomly selected 90 urine samples from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors Study (41 males and 49 females). The samples were analyzed with 2 multiplex assays, Multiplex Inflammation I and Cardiovascular II kits (Olink Bioscience, Uppsala, Sweden). We analyzed the correlations between 158 cytokines in urine with apolipoprotein A1, HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were strong correlations for apolipoprotein A1 and HDL cholesterol with individual cytokines. After adjustment for multiplicity testing, there were 33 significant correlations between apolipoprotein A1 and cytokine levels and 14 of these were also significantly correlated with HDL cholesterol. The strongest associations were observed for IL-1 alpha, SPON2, RAGE, PAR-1, TRAIL-R2, IL-4RA, TNFRSF11A, and SCF. A total of 28 out of 33 correlations were negative, indicating a negative relationship between apolipoprotein A1 and urinary cytokines. The study shows a negative correlation between apolipoprotein A1 and HDL cholesterol and urinary cytokine levels. The finding is in agreement with the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL.

Keywords
HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, cytokines, multiplex assays, urine
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394993 (URN)10.1089/jir.2019.0074 (DOI)000510520300001 ()31599692 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Hysing, E.-B., Smith, L., Thulin, M., Karlsten, R., Bothelius, K. & Gordh, T. (2019). Detection of systemic inflammation in severely impaired chronic pain patients and effects of a multimodal pain rehabilitation program. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 19(2), 235-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of systemic inflammation in severely impaired chronic pain patients and effects of a multimodal pain rehabilitation program
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 235-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Recent research indicates a previously unknown low-grade systemic or neurogenic inflammation in groups of chronic pain (CP) patients. Low-grade inflammation may have an important role in symptoms that have previously not been well depicted: widespread pain, tiredness and cognitive dysfunctions frequently seen in severely impaired CP patients. This study aimed to investigate the plasma inflammatory profile in a group of very complex CP patients at baseline and at a 1-year follow-up after participation in a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)-based multimodal pain rehabilitation program (PRP).

Methods: Blood samples were collected from 52 well-characterized CP patients. Age- and sex-matched healthy blood donors served as controls. The samples were analyzed with a multiple Proximal Extension Analysis allowing a simultaneous analysis of 92 inflammation-related proteins consisting mainly of cytokines, chemokines and growth-factors. At follow-up, 1-year after participation in the RPR samples from 28 patients were analyzed. The results were confirmed by a multi-array technology that allows quantitative estimation.

Results: Clear signs of increased inflammatory activity were detected in the CP patients. Accepting a false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%, there were significant differences in 43/92 inflammatory biomarkers compared with the controls. In three biomarkers (CXCL5, SIRT2, AXIN1) the expression levels were elevated more than eight times. One year after the PRP, with the patients serving as their own controls, a significant decrease in overall inflammatory activity was found.

Conclusions: Our results indicate that the most impaired CP patients suffer from low-grade chronic systemic inflammation not described earlier with this level of detail. The results may have implications for a better understanding of the cluster of co-morbid symptoms described as the "sickness-syndrome" and the wide-spread pain seen in this group of patients. The decrease in inflammatory biomarkers noted at the follow-up after participation in the PRP may reflect the positive effects obtained on somatic and psycho-social mechanisms involved in the inflammatory process by a rehabilitation program. Besides the PRP, no major changes in medication or lifestyle factors were implemented during the same period. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting that a PRP may induce inflammatory-reducing effects. Further studies are needed to verify the objective findings in CP patients and address the question of causality that remains to be solved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WALTER DE GRUYTER GMBH, 2019
Keywords
inflammatory biomarkers, severely impaired pain patients, central inflammation, systemic inflammation, pain rehabilitation program
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382511 (URN)10.1515/sjpain-2018-0340 (DOI)000463370000003 ()30893060 (PubMedID)
Funder
VinnovaSwedish Research Council, P29797-1
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Dyhrfort, P., Shen, Q., Clausen, F., Eriksson, M., Enblad, P., Kamali-Moghaddam, M., . . . Hillered, L. (2019). Monitoring of Protein Biomarkers of Inflammation in Human Traumatic Brain Injury Using Microdialysis and Proximity Extension Assay Technology in Neurointensive Care. Journal of Neurotrauma, 36(20), 2872-2885
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring of Protein Biomarkers of Inflammation in Human Traumatic Brain Injury Using Microdialysis and Proximity Extension Assay Technology in Neurointensive Care
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 2872-2885Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is followed by secondary injury mechanisms strongly involving neuroinflammation. To monitor the complex inflammatory cascade in human TBI, we used cerebral microdialysis (MD) and multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) technology and simultaneously measured levels of 92 protein biomarkers of inflammation in MD samples every three hours for five days in 10 patients with severe TBI under neurointensive care. One mu L MD samples were incubated with paired oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies binding to each protein, allowing quantification by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Sixty-nine proteins were suitable for statistical analysis. We found five different patterns with either early (<48 h; e.g., CCL20, IL6, LIF, CCL3), mid (48-96 h; e.g., CCL19, CXCL5, CXCL10, MMP1), late (>96 h; e.g., CD40, MCP2, MCP3), biphasic peaks (e.g., CXCL1, CXCL5, IL8) or stable (e.g., CCL4, DNER, VEGFA)/low trends. High protein levels were observed for e.g., CXCL1, CXCL10, MCP1, MCP2, IL8, while e.g., CCL28 and MCP4 were detected at low levels. Several proteins (CCL8, -19, -20, -23, CXCL1, -5, -6, -9, -11, CST5, DNER, Flt3L, and SIRT2) have not been studied previously in human TBI. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that LIF and CXCL5 may play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. This study provides a unique data set with individual temporal trends for potential inflammatory biomarkers in patients with TBI. We conclude that the combination of MD and PEA is a powerful tool to map the complex inflammatory cascade in the injured human brain. The technique offers new possibilities of protein profiling of complex secondary injury pathways.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, 2019
Keywords
biomarkers, inflammation, microdialysis, molecular tools, neurointensive care, proteomics, traumatic brain injury
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396069 (URN)10.1089/neu.2018.6320 (DOI)000472621900001 ()31017044 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilVinnova
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Persson, I., Arnroth, L. & Thulin, M. (2019). Multivariate two-sample permutation tests for trials with multiple time-to-event outcomes. Pharmaceutical statistics, 18(4), 476-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivariate two-sample permutation tests for trials with multiple time-to-event outcomes
2019 (English)In: Pharmaceutical statistics, ISSN 1539-1604, E-ISSN 1539-1612, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 476-485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical trials involving multiple time-to-event outcomes are increasingly common. In this paper, permutation tests for testing for group differences in multivariate time-to-event data are proposed. Unlike other two-sample tests for multivariate survival data, the proposed tests attain the nominal type I error rate. A simulation study shows that the proposed tests outperform their competitors when the degree of censored observations is sufficiently high. When the degree of censoring is low, it is seen that naive tests such as Hotelling's T-2 outperform tests tailored to survival data. Computational and practical aspects of the proposed tests are discussed, and their use is illustrated by analyses of three publicly available datasets. Implementations of the proposed tests are available in an accompanying R package.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
lifetime data, multivariate logrank test, survival analysis, two-sample test
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391023 (URN)10.1002/pst.1938 (DOI)000474896500007 ()30912618 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2017-7-83Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2017/1-244
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Wu, D., Yan, J., Shen, X., Sun, Y., Thulin, M., Cai, Y., . . . Kamali-Moghaddam, M. (2019). Profiling surface proteins on individual exosomes using a proximity barcoding assay. Nature Communications, 10, Article ID 3854.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Profiling surface proteins on individual exosomes using a proximity barcoding assay
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2019 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 3854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exosomes have been implicated in numerous biological processes, and they may serve as important disease markers. Surface proteins on exosomes carry information about their tissues of origin. Because of the heterogeneity of exosomes it is desirable to investigate them individually, but this has so far remained impractical. Here, we demonstrate a proximity-dependent barcoding assay to profile surface proteins of individual exosomes using antibody-DNA conjugates and next-generation sequencing. We first validate the method using artificial streptavidin-oligonucleotide complexes, followed by analysis of the variable composition of surface proteins on individual exosomes, derived from human body fluids or cell culture media. Exosomes from different sources are characterized by the presence of specific combinations of surface proteins and their abundance, allowing exosomes to be separately quantified in mixed samples to serve as markers for tissue-specific engagement in disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398851 (URN)10.1038/s41467-019-11486-1 (DOI)000482567200002 ()31451692 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 294409
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Åberg Lindell, M., Andersson, P., Grape, S., Hellesen, C., Håkansson, A. & Eriksson, M. (2018). Discrimination of irradiated MOX fuel from UOX fuel by multivariate statistical analysis of simulated activities of gamma-emitting isotopes. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 885, 67-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discrimination of irradiated MOX fuel from UOX fuel by multivariate statistical analysis of simulated activities of gamma-emitting isotopes
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2018 (English)In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 885, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates how concentrations of certain fission products and their related gamma-ray emissions can be used to discriminate between uranium oxide (UOX) and mixed oxide (MOX) type fuel. Discrimination of irradiated MOX fuel from irradiated UOX fuel is important in nuclear facilities and for transport of nuclear fuel, for purposes of both criticality safety and nuclear safeguards. Although facility operators keep records on the identity and properties of each fuel, tools for nuclear safeguards inspectors that enable independent verification of the fuel are critical in the recovery of continuity of knowledge, should it be lost. A discrimination methodology for classification of UOX and MOX fuel, based on passive gamma-ray spectroscopy data and multivariate analysis methods, is presented. Nuclear fuels and their gamma-ray emissions were simulated in the Monte Carlo code Serpent, and the resulting data was used as input to train seven different multivariate classification techniques. The trained classifiers were subsequently implemented and evaluated with respect to their capabilities to correctly predict the classes of unknown fuel items. The best results concerning successful discrimination of UOX and MOX-fuel were acquired when using non-linear classification techniques, such as the k nearest neighbors method and the Gaussian kernel support vector machine. For fuel with cooling times up to 20 years, when it is considered that gamma-rays from the isotope  134Cs can still be efficiently measured, success rates of 100% were obtained. A sensitivity analysis indicated that these methods were also robust.

Keywords
Spent nuclear fuel, MOX, Gamma spectroscopy, Multivariate analysis, Classification
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337676 (URN)10.1016/j.nima.2017.12.020 (DOI)000424740800009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 621-2009-3991Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SSM2016-661
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
Åberg Lindell, M., Andersson, P., Grape, S., Håkansson, A. & Eriksson, M. (2018). Estimating irradiated nuclear fuel characteristics by nonlinear multivariate regression of simulated gamma-ray emissions. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 897, 85-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating irradiated nuclear fuel characteristics by nonlinear multivariate regression of simulated gamma-ray emissions
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2018 (English)In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 897, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In addition to verifying operator declared parameters of spent nuclear fuel, the ability to experimentally infer such parameters with a minimum of intrusiveness is of great interest and has been long-sought after in the nuclear safeguards community. It can also be anticipated that such ability would be of interest for quality assurance in e.g. recycling facilities in future Generation IV nuclear fuel cycles. One way to obtain information regarding spent nuclear fuel is to measure various gamma-ray intensities using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. While intensities from a few isotopes obtained from such measurements have traditionally been used pairwise, the approach in this work is to simultaneously analyze correlations between all available isotopes, using multivariate analysis techniques. Based on this approach, a methodology for inferring burnup, cooling time, and initial fissile content of PWR fuels using passive gamma-ray spectroscopy data has been investigated. PWR nuclear fuels, of UOX and MOX type, and their gamma-ray emissions, were simulated using the Monte Carlo code Serpent. Data comprising relative isotope activities was analyzed with decision trees and support vector machines, for predicting fuel parameters and their associated uncertainties. From this work it may be concluded that up to a cooling time of twenty years, the 95% prediction intervals of burnup, cooling time and initial fissile content could be inferred to within approximately 7 MWd/kgHM, 8 months, and 1.4 percentage points, respectively. An attempt aiming to estimate the plutonium content in spent UOX fuel, using the developed multivariate analysis model, is also presented. The results for Pu mass estimation are promising and call for further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Nuclear safeguards, Spent nuclear fuel, Gamma-ray, Multivariate analysis, Nonlinear regression
National Category
Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357374 (URN)10.1016/j.nima.2018.04.034 (DOI)000433206800014 ()
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M. & Zwanzig, S. (2017). Exact confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for parameters of discrete distributions. Bernoulli, 23(1), 479-502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exact confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for parameters of discrete distributions
2017 (English)In: Bernoulli, ISSN 1350-7265, E-ISSN 1573-9759, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 479-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study exact confidence intervals and two-sided hypothesis tests for univariate parameters of stochastically increasing discrete distributions, such as the binomial and Poisson distributions. It is shown that several popular methods for constructing short intervals lack strict nestedness, meaning that accepting a lower confidence level not always will lead to a shorter confidence interval. These intervals correspond to a class of tests that are shown to assign differing p-values to indistinguishable models. Finally, we show that among strictly nested intervals, fiducial intervals, including the Clopper-Pearson interval for a binomial proportion and the Garwood interval for a Poisson mean, are optimal.

Keywords
binomial distribution, confidence interval, expected length, fiducial interval, hypothesis test, Poisson distribution
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-229398 (URN)10.3150/15-BEJ750 (DOI)000389565500017 ()
Available from: 2014-08-06 Created: 2014-08-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Bäckryd, E., Lind, A.-L., Thulin, M., Larsson, A., Gerdle, B. & Gordh, T. (2017). High levels of cerebrospinal fluid chemokines point to the presence of neuroinflammation in peripheral neuropathic pain: a cross-sectional study of 2 cohorts of patients compared with healthy controls. Pain, 158(12), 2487-2495
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High levels of cerebrospinal fluid chemokines point to the presence of neuroinflammation in peripheral neuropathic pain: a cross-sectional study of 2 cohorts of patients compared with healthy controls
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2017 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 158, no 12, p. 2487-2495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animal models suggest that chemokines are important mediators in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. Indeed, these substances have been called "gliotransmitters," a term that illustrates the close interplay between glial cells and neurons in the context of neuroinflammation and pain. However, evidence in humans is scarce. The aim of the study was to determine a comprehensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory profile of patients with neuropathic pain. Our hypothesis was that we would thereby find indications of a postulated on-going process of central neuroinflammation. Samples of CSF were collected from 2 cohorts of patients with neuropathic pain (n = 11 and n = 16, respectively) and healthy control subjects (n = 11). The samples were analyzed with a multiplex proximity extension assay in which 92 inflammation-related proteins were measured simultaneously (Proseek Multiplex Inflammation I; Olink Bioscience, Uppsala, Sweden). Univariate testing with control of false discovery rate, as well as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, were used for statistical analyses. Levels of chemokines CXCL6, CXCL10, CCL8, CCL11, CCL23 in CSF, as well as protein LAPTGF-beta-1, were significantly higher in both neuropathic pain cohorts compared with healthy controls, pointing to neuroinflammation in patients. These 6 proteins were also major results in a recent similar study in patients with fibromyalgia. The findings need to be confirmed in larger cohorts, and the question of causality remains to be settled. Because it has been suggested that prevalent comorbidities to chronic pain (eg, depression, anxiety, poor sleep, and tiredness) also are associated with neuroinflammation, it will be important to determine whether neuroinflammation is a common mediator.

National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335278 (URN)10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001061 (DOI)000419133700022 ()28930774 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-02 Created: 2017-12-02 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
Hysing, E.-B., Smith, L., Eriksson, M., Karlsten, R., Butler, S. & Gordh, T. (2017). Identifying characteristics of the most severely impaired chronic pain patients treated at a specialized inpatient pain clinic. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 17(1), 178-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying characteristics of the most severely impaired chronic pain patients treated at a specialized inpatient pain clinic
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Patients suffering from chronic nonmalignant pain constitute a heterogeneous population in terms of clinical presentation and treatment results. Few data are available about what distinguishes different groups in this huge population of patients with chronic persistent pain (CPP). A subgroup that is poorly studied, consists of the most severely impaired chronic pain patients. At the Uppsala University Hospital Pain Clinic, there is a specialized department accepting the most complex patients for rehabilitation. In the endeavour to improve and evaluate treatment for this subgroup, a better understanding of the complex nature of the illness is essential. This prospective study aimed to describe the characteristics of this subgroup of patients with CPP.

Methods: Seventy-two consecutive patients enrolled in the Uppsala programme were evaluated. We collected data on demographics, type of pain and experienced symptoms other than pain using a checklist of 41 possible symptoms. Psychiatric comorbidity was assessed by a psychiatrist using a structured clinical interview. Quality of life (QoL), pain rating and medication/drug/alcohol usage were measured by validated questionnaires: SF-36, NRS, DUDIT and AUDIT. Concerning physical functioning and sick leave, a comparison was made with data from the Swedish Quality Register Registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP).

Results: The cohort consisted of 61% women and the average age was 45 (range 20-70) years. For this cohort, 74% reported being on sick leave or disability-pension. In the SQRP 59% were on sick leave at the time they entered the rehabilitation programmes [1]. On average, the study-population reported 22 symptoms other than pain, to be at a high rate of severity. Patients treated in conventional pain rehabilitation programmes reported a mean of 10 symptoms in average. Symptoms reported with the highest frequency (>80%), were lethargy, tiredness, headache and difficulties concentrating. Seventysix percent were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Sixty-nine fulfilled the criteria for depression or depression/anxiety disorder despite that most (65%) were treated with psychotropic medication. Alcohol/drug abuse was minimal. Seventy-one percent were on opioids but the doses were moderate (<100 mg) MEq. The pain rating was >= 7 (out of a maximum of 10) for 60% of the patients.

Conclusion: This study describes what makes the subgroup of pain patients most affected by their pain special according to associated factors and comorbidity We found that they were distinguished by a high degree of psychiatric comorbidity, low physical functioning and extreme levels of symptom preoccupation/hypervigilance. Many severe symptoms additional to pain (e.g. depression/anxiety, tiredness, disturbed sleep, lack of concentration, constipation) were reported. The group seems hypervigilant, overwhelmed with a multitude of different symptoms on a high severity level.

Implications: When treating this complex group, the expressions of the illness can act as obstacles to achieve successful treatment outcomes. The study provides evidence based information, for a better understanding of the needs concerning these pain patients. Our result indicates that parallel assessment and treatment of psychiatric comorbidities and sleep disorders combined with traditional rehabilitation, i.e. physical activation and cognitive reorganization are imperative for improved outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WALTER DE GRUYTER GMBH, 2017
Keywords
Characterization of patients with severe, chronic persistent pain, Subgrouping patients with chronic, persistent pain, Severely impaired patients with chronic, pain, Psychiatric comorbidity, Physical dysfunction, Systemic symptoms other than pain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341827 (URN)10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.09.008 (DOI)000419851500030 ()29032350 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
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