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Iversen, Clara, PhD
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Iversen, C. (2019). Beyond accessing information: Claiming to understand in child social welfare interviews. British Journal of Social Psychology, 58(3), 550-568
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond accessing information: Claiming to understand in child social welfare interviews
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0144-6665, E-ISSN 2044-8309, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 550-568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present article investigates how people manage understanding of personal experiences in an institutional setting in which shared understanding of one party's experience can become an issue at stake: social welfare interviews with child victims of abuse. New recommendations on how to respond to child interviewees limit interviewers’ support to experiences of which they have direct access. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology to examine cases in which interviewers respond to children's reports of experiences by claiming to understand, the current article shows that interviewers primarily use such claims after interviewees have indicated that the interviewer may not understand. By claiming to understand, interviewers orient to a difference between an interview requirement – not assuming they know the children's specific experiences – and their ability to interpret the children's situations. The study shows how interviewers use claims of understanding to distinguish themselves as understanding persons from their information‐eliciting approach as social welfare investigators. Findings contribute to social psychological research on how people manage challenges related to eliciting and recognizing experience in interaction. In particular, the study offers research on interviews with child victims of abuse a new angle on the tension between information elicitation and support.

Keywords
affiliation, child social welfare, conversation analysis, discursive psychology, interviewing, shared understanding
National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366813 (URN)10.1111/bjso.12289 (DOI)000477771700004 ()30431156 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-00410Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, 2.4-55224/2012
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C. (2018). Claims of understanding in child social welfare interviews. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Conference of Conversation Analysis (ICCA2018), 11-15 July, 2018, Loughborough, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Claims of understanding in child social welfare interviews
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Claims of understanding in child social welfare risk assessment interviews: the relation between position, turn-­‐composition, and interactional work.Clara Iversen(Uppsala Universitty). This study examines interviewers’ claims of understanding in risk assessment interviews with abused children in child social welfare investigations in Sweden. In clinical research about interviewing abused children, mainly conducted within forensic psychology, there is an increased emphasis on the need of a supportive interview climate. While interviewers are still told to avoid claiming to understand interviewees’ past experiences, new recommendations (Herkowitz et al. 2014) suggest that interviewers should claim understanding of children’s interview experiences (e.g., ‘I understand that it is very difficult for you to tell me this’). No interview research has examined in detail the actual work that different variations of understanding claims do in this setting. In other institutional and mundane contexts, studies have shown that psychological terms, such as ‘understand’, are involved in complex activities, related to different agendas (e.g., Weatherall & Keevallik 2016; Lindwall &Lymer 2011). Drawing on this research and findings on stance and affiliation (e.g. Couper-­‐Kuhlen 2012), the current study examines the position and composition of interviewers’ claims of understanding in 48 audio-­‐recorded social welfare interviews with abused children.The findings show that the two distinct ways in which claims of understanding can be composed in Swedish, with the indexical first or last (‘Det förstår jag’, ‘Jag förstår det’) do different kinds of work. While the former comes in place of a second assessment after interviewees’ displayed stance, the latter is related to closing an interview topic by indexing the interviewers’ candidate understanding. In contrast to recommendations, there were no examples in the data of interviewers claimingto understand children’s interview experiences, but interviewee’s display of upset was attended to with prosody. Unlike formulations or prosody, which show shared understanding, understanding claims treat experiences as sharable, without actually sharing them. They are therefore best understood as a less entitled kind of affiliation, useful when both evaluation and neutrality is a problematic response. The study illustrates how recommendations about interaction, which lack grounding in detailed analysis ofwhat different kinds of ‘supportive’ resources do, may end up advocating practices counter to their agenda. With these findings, the paper aims to contribute to discursive psychological work on how the cognitive thesaurus is used in institutional interaction.

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357362 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference of Conversation Analysis (ICCA2018), 11-15 July, 2018, Loughborough, UK
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C. & Flinkfeldt, M. (2018). Kroppens dubbla roll i medicinsk interaktion: Iscensättande av symptom i sömnapnékonsultationer. In: : . Paper presented at OFTI 36 Områdesgruppen för tal och interaktion, 20-21 september, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kroppens dubbla roll i medicinsk interaktion: Iscensättande av symptom i sömnapnékonsultationer
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392721 (URN)
Conference
OFTI 36 Områdesgruppen för tal och interaktion, 20-21 september, Stockholm, Sweden
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Westerlund, M. & Iversen, C. (2018). "The hopelessness can be overwhelming": Online suicide helpline volunteers' work to manage the seriousness of help-seekers' accounts. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Conference of Conversation Analysis (ICCA2018), 11-15 July, 2018, Loughborough UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"The hopelessness can be overwhelming": Online suicide helpline volunteers' work to manage the seriousness of help-seekers' accounts
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper presents initial analysis from a recently started project on suicide helpline communication. Preventive measures for reducing suicide are currently developed at many levels in Sweden, primarily related to biological, environmental, and social causes of suicide. Because suicide, unlike for example illness, involves primarily voluntary actions, it is difficult to predict. Prevention cannot adequately address the problem without knowledge of how individuals interpret suicide as a meaningful solution to life problems. However, updated empirically based knowledge of how suicidal persons in interaction with others interpret their situation is scarce. Foundational ethnomethodological and conversation analytic work in relation to suicide has shown the utility of examining how suicide is made meaningful in interaction, but this research is largely focused on how the suicidal person justifies suicide (Sacks 1967; Douglas 1967; Jacobs 1967). Because others’ responses can either slow down or speed up a suicidal process, it is important to focus on co-­‐participants’ actions when suicide intention has been communicated. Research on online forum interaction has shown that suicidal persons in this setting orient to ‘being authentic’—not just using suicide threats to gain sympathy (Horne & Wiggins 2009). Drawing on this research, we use conversation analysis to study how volunteers in Sweden’s first suicide helpline manage taking help-­‐seekers’ problems seriously, while not justifying suicide. Like suicide research in general, suicide helpline research is dominated by quantitative approaches based on researchers’ classifications, theoretically considered to be important. However, CA studies have shown that researchers’ categories do not necessarily coincide with how suicidal individuals understand their situation and others’ responses. Therefore, it is important to complement the current focus on official statistics and researchers’ definitions with research on how help-­‐seekers and volunteers in helpline communication negotiate the meaning of suicide

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357365 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference of Conversation Analysis (ICCA2018), 11-15 July, 2018, Loughborough UK
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01328
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C., Broström, A. & Ulander, M. (2018). Traffic risk work with sleepy patients: from rationality to practice. Health, Risk and Society, 20(1-2), 23-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traffic risk work with sleepy patients: from rationality to practice
2018 (English)In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we aim to contribute to the emerging field of risk-work studies by examining the relationship between risk rationality and risk practices in nurses’ conversations with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients about traffic risks. Legislation in Sweden towards traffic risk involves clinicians making risk assessment of patients prone to falling asleep while driving. In contrast to an overall care rationale, this means that the health of the patient is not the only risk object in treatment consultations. However, guidelines on how to implement legislation are missing. To examine the practical reality of nurses’ traffic-risk work, we draw on an analysis of data from a Swedish study in 2015. This study included qualitative interviews with specialist nurses and video-recorded interactions between nurses and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients. We found that a lack of clarity in traffic-risk guidelines on how risk should be addressed was evident in both interview accounts and in observed practice. While nurses primarily accounted for risk work as treatment-relevant education, they practised risk work as interrogation. Patients also treated nurses’ inquiries as assessment – not education – by responding defensively. We conclude that while confusing risk work and treatment enables clinicians to treat patients as competent actors, it obscures the controlling aspects of traffic-risk questions for individual patients and downplays the implications of drowsy driving for general traffic safety.

National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333626 (URN)10.1080/13698575.2017.1399986 (DOI)000426919500003 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 263699Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), DNR. 566401Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 376541
Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C. (2018). “What would you say to a friend in your situation?”: Volunteers’ hypothetical questions to help-seekers on a suicide helpline. In: : . Paper presented at 5th Nordic Interdisciplinary Conference on Discourse and Interaction, NORDISCO, Aarhus, Denmark, 21 Nov 2018 → 23 Nov 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“What would you say to a friend in your situation?”: Volunteers’ hypothetical questions to help-seekers on a suicide helpline
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366808 (URN)
Conference
5th Nordic Interdisciplinary Conference on Discourse and Interaction, NORDISCO, Aarhus, Denmark, 21 Nov 2018 → 23 Nov 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01328
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C., Broström, A. & Ulander, M. (2017). Balancing task focus and relationship building: Asking sleepy patients about traffic risk in treatment initiation consultations. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(4), 895-903
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing task focus and relationship building: Asking sleepy patients about traffic risk in treatment initiation consultations
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 895-903Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The use of traffic risk assessment questions is an understudied area in nursing research. Obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with an increased risk of traffic accidents. Therefore, traffic safety authorities demand adherent continuous positive airway pressure use. Nurses act as coaches to achieve treatment adherence, but they are also obliged to act as state agents by prohibiting obstructive sleep apnoea patients from drowsy driving.

Objective: To examine how nurses and obstructive sleep apnoea patients manage traffic risk assessment questions in the relation-building context of treatment initiation consultations.

Methods: To study, in detail, the actual practice of risk assessment, we used conversation analysis of 19 video-recorded initial treatment consultations with nurses and recently diagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

Ethics: The study received ethical approval from the Central Ethical Review Board in Linkoping (registration number 214/231-32) and follows the ethical guidelines for qualitative research.

Results: Patients influence how nurses phrase questions about traffic risk by taking a stance to daytime sleepiness prior to the risk question. Nurses ask traffic risk questions in a way that assumes that driving is unproblematic if patients have not previously indicated problems. It may pose a significant problem when nurses, by accepting patients' prior stance when asking about traffic risk, orient to relationship building rather than task focus.

Conclusion: To clarify the difference between their two potentially conflicting roles, nurses need to refer to existing laws and official guidelines when they raise the issue of risk in treatment initiation consultations. Nurses should also ask risk assessment questions in a problem-oriented communicative environment. Traffic risk assessment is sensitive yet important, as obstructive sleep apnoea is a highly prevalent problem causing excessive sleepiness. It is essential to acknowledge nurses' double roles with regard to coaching continuous positive airway pressure treatment and assessing traffic risk.

National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-307176 (URN)10.1111/scs.12411 (DOI)000416413000028 ()28439962 (PubMedID)
Projects
Convaluation
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC (CEV) (263699)
Available from: 2016-11-10 Created: 2016-11-10 Last updated: 2018-01-30Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C., Broström, A. & Ulander, M. (2017). 'No problems when you drive?' nurses balancing conflicting roles as coaches and state agents when they ask sleepy patients about traffic risk. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(Suppl. 1), S85-S85, Article ID 222.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'No problems when you drive?' nurses balancing conflicting roles as coaches and state agents when they ask sleepy patients about traffic risk
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S85-S85, article id 222Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2017
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377430 (URN)10.1177/1474515117700580 (DOI)000401775600145 ()
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C. (2017). Now or never: Smoking cessation discussions in the face of serious illness. Sociology of Health and Illness, 39(8), 1330-1348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Now or never: Smoking cessation discussions in the face of serious illness
2017 (English)In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1330-1348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317177 (URN)10.1111/1467-9566.12588 (DOI)000415732400003 ()28681921 (PubMedID)
Projects
Dignity in Action
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2169
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Iversen, C. (2015). Hitting ontological rock bottom: Discursive psychology's respecification of the realism/relativism debate. In: Elizabeth Stokoe & Cristian Tileaga (Ed.), Discursive Psychology: Classic and Contemporary Issues. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hitting ontological rock bottom: Discursive psychology's respecification of the realism/relativism debate
2015 (English)In: Discursive Psychology: Classic and Contemporary Issues / [ed] Elizabeth Stokoe & Cristian Tileaga, London: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235248 (URN)
Funder
Welfare and Life-course
Available from: 2014-10-30 Created: 2014-10-30 Last updated: 2014-12-11
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