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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Nakada, M., Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2024). Truth and reality in the digital lifeworld: Departure from reductionism. In: Thomas Taro Lennerfors, Kiyoshi Murata (Ed.), Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures: (pp. 72-92). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Truth and reality in the digital lifeworld: Departure from reductionism
2024 (English)In: Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures / [ed] Thomas Taro Lennerfors, Kiyoshi Murata, London: Routledge, 2024, p. 72-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we will try to find ways to overcome the so-called techno-determinism which seems to influence our life in the informatized environments. In the first half of this chapter, we will critically examine the generally accepted belief that mathematics is related to reality as a static and fixed form. We will see that mathematics is rather a plural matter including human intention, the procedures to rewrite the relation between the complex functions as the original problem, and the calculated solutions as the potential answers or so. In this sense, the belief about mathematics as a fixed truth is not stable anymore. This suggests the techno-determinism itself is not stable anymore, either. In the last half of this chapter, we will see the work of a kind of horizon enabling us to interpret matters in life not as remnants of mathematical and scientific truths. We will do this by examining our qualitative and quantitative research in Japan, Sweden, and other countries. Our research show that the robots and other technological products will encounter with us on a kind of horizon in our life where things and matters seem to remain in the form of un-differentiated situations or ‘oneness.’

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2024
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Mathematics Philosophy Ethics
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510582 (URN)10.4324/9781003367451-6 (DOI)9781032434643 (ISBN)9781032434667 (ISBN)9781003367451 (ISBN)
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2023-08-31 Created: 2023-08-31 Last updated: 2024-04-03Bibliographically approved
Asai, R., Nakada, M. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2023). Care Robots and Humanity: How Can We Cope with The Indeterminacy and Ambiguity of Robot-Human Relationships?. In: Minna M. Rantanen, Salla Westerstrand, Otto Sahlgren and Jani Koskinen (Ed.), Tethics 2023: Proceedings of the Conference on Technology Ethics 2023. Paper presented at Conference on Technology Ethics – Tethics 2023 (pp. 1-10). CEUR-WS.org
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care Robots and Humanity: How Can We Cope with The Indeterminacy and Ambiguity of Robot-Human Relationships?
2023 (English)In: Tethics 2023: Proceedings of the Conference on Technology Ethics 2023 / [ed] Minna M. Rantanen, Salla Westerstrand, Otto Sahlgren and Jani Koskinen, CEUR-WS.org , 2023, p. 1-10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ageing society, labour shortages in the care sector and increasing social security costs havebecome serious social problems in many countries. Sweden and Japan are, of course, noexception in this respect. In order to alleviate this situation, both countries have implementedvarious policies in different social areas, as well as promoting digitalisation and introducingcare robots in the healthcare sector. While older people are generally considered to be reluctantto adapt to new technologies, in both Japan and Sweden, the digital integration of older peopleis higher than in other countries. In the near future, care robots or robotic care would becomemore common in the care sector in both countries. This study examines how people in bothcountries perceive robots and autonomous artefacts and how they construct relationships withthese artefacts, based on the results of two surveys, one conducted in Japan 2020, and anotherin Sweden 2019, and elucidates the relationship between humans and robots from an ethicalperspective. The research findings show that people’s orientation toward the search for theexistential meaning and their complex emotions related to ephemerality and transience canaffect the relationship between humans and robots. Furthermore, this study is a new attempt toincorporate a 'care' perspective into technology ethics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CEUR-WS.org, 2023
Series
CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073 ; Vol-3582
Keywords
Care, robots, ethics, existential meanings, ephemerality, horizon
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-511266 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Technology Ethics – Tethics 2023
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2024-04-03Bibliographically approved
Grassman, R., Asai, R. & Davis, M. (2023). The ascent of memetic movements: Social media, Levinasian ethics and the global spread of Q-anon conspiracy theories. In: Thomas Taro Lennerfors; Kiyoshi Murata (Ed.), Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures: (pp. 143-168). Abingdon; New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ascent of memetic movements: Social media, Levinasian ethics and the global spread of Q-anon conspiracy theories
2023 (English)In: Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures / [ed] Thomas Taro Lennerfors; Kiyoshi Murata, Abingdon; New York: Routledge, 2023, p. 143-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The ascent of social media continues to have profound and far-reaching impacts on societies and institutions, by way of becoming increasingly intertwined with social movements across the world. Moreover, there is an increasing awareness of how people are being lured into consuming certain information through meme-like virality, or gamelike characteristics, paralleling an unprecedented contagion of conspiracy theories. Nevertheless, strikingly few studies explicitly connect the dots on how our current post-pandemic onslaught of online conspiracist fervour may have more to do with the medium than with the actual content that comes through. This in spite of the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol, that in large part was enmeshed in this elaborate misinformation complex called Q-anon, wherein a bizarre assemblage of disinformation loosely anchored in an underlying white supremacist logic, could consolidate a global and cross-cultural movement through the power of the meme. In this chapter, we explore how this Q-anon movement that played a significant role in the attack of January 6th did not just pull off this one extraordinary assault on US democracy and fall apart in the flurry of counter-conspiratorial evidence revealed in its wake. More worryingly, it has proved resilient enough to spread globally and across cultural boundaries to countries as diverse as Sweden and Japan. Exploring this phenomenon, we will be web-scraping relevant social media in Japan and Sweden. Finally, by employing a Levinasian perspective on ethics, we consider the appropriate lessons of what in this view may be seen as a reification of otherness to accentuate sameness, as opposed to appreciating alterity as constitutive of subjectification and the ethics associated therewith.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon; New York: Routledge, 2023
Series
Routledge Series on Digital Spaces
Keywords
Q-anon, Memes, Conspiracy, Social media
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-518399 (URN)10.4324/9781003367451-10 (DOI)9781003367451 (ISBN)9781032434643 (ISBN)9781032434667 (ISBN)
Projects
JSPS/STINT Bilateral Joint Research Project “Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability and Ethics: Cross-national Studies between Japan and Sweden” (JPJSBP120185411)
Available from: 2023-12-18 Created: 2023-12-18 Last updated: 2024-03-20Bibliographically approved
Nakada, M., Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2021). Robots and AI Artifacts in Plural Perspective(s) of Japan and the West: The Cultural–Ethical Traditions Behind People’s Views on Robots and AI Artifacts in the Information Era. The Review of Socionetwork Strategies, 15(1), 143-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Robots and AI Artifacts in Plural Perspective(s) of Japan and the West: The Cultural–Ethical Traditions Behind People’s Views on Robots and AI Artifacts in the Information Era
2021 (English)In: The Review of Socionetwork Strategies, E-ISSN 1867-3236, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 143-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we examine the meanings of robots and AI artifacts in our societies and cultures, in particular the question: ‘How do Japanese people and Western people understand and interpret the phenomena and problems happening around them such as human–robot interaction, the encounter with AI, especially regarding plurality of meanings and wholeness of life experience in the information era?’ This is a kind of topic of information ethics or IIE (intercultural information ethics) in a broad sense. We focus our attention on world views in the informatized environments by examining the related views and theories as well as our own empirical research. In addition to these points, we will compare Japanese survey data with data from other cultural–social traditions and we will examine how the Japanese ways of seeing matters and their emphasis on the matters in process of awareness can be considered to have potentially universal connotations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Japanese existential views, Swedish existential views, Information ethics, Matters in process, Human encounter with robots
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction; Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-451882 (URN)10.1007/s12626-021-00067-8 (DOI)000635472200001 ()
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2021-10-01Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2018). Philosophy as the Road to Good ICT. In: David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa (Ed.), This Changes Everything – ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do?. Paper presented at 13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018 (pp. 293-298). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophy as the Road to Good ICT
2018 (English)In: This Changes Everything – ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do? / [ed] David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa, Springer, 2018, p. 293-298Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Handling satisfactorily ICT ethics issues in the design as well as in the use of systems, demands continuous adjustment to relevant values. In privacy, robotics and sustainability, this can be achieved through the development of personal thinking skills and the establishment and running of suitable group processes. In ethical decision making it is important to make a distinction between thinking as a process, and value-content as the result of this process. By focusing on the process, i.e. philosophizing, the philosophical method of deliberative thinking, we can construct and apply tools to support ethical decision making during the development and the use of ICT systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
IFIP AICT, ISSN 1868-4238, E-ISSN 868-422X ; 537
Keywords
Ethics, ICT, Method, Moral, Philosophizing, Privacy, Robots, Sustainability, Tools
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360591 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-99605-9_22 (DOI)978-3-319-99604-2 (ISBN)
Conference
13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I., Asai, R., Adams, A. A. & Murata, K. (2017). Snowden’s revelations and the attitudes of students at Swedish universities. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 15(3), 247-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snowden’s revelations and the attitudes of students at Swedish universities
2017 (English)In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 247-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This study aims to map Swedish students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their effects in the political and socio-cultural environment of Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was answered by 190 Swedish university students. The quantitative responses to the survey and qualitative considerations of free text answers were statistically analysed.

Findings – Swedish students had a high level of knowledge about the Snowden revelations; they actively searched for information, gave a positive judgement of Snowden’s actions and were willing to follow his example in Sweden, although not in the USA. They trusted their country and most of its institutions and authorities except for secret service agencies and the internet and computer software companies.

Practical implications – This study could be used as a design of education for university students, especially in information technology programmes.

Social implications – The study can be used for developing and applying policies on privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing.

Originality/value – This study is part of a bigger international study to map students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their opinions about privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing opening up for cross-cultural analyses.

Keywords
Sweden, Surveillance, Privacy, Snowden
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology Psychology Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT Political Science Sociology Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329414 (URN)10.1108/JICES-02-2017-0009 (DOI)000412561100006 ()
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Asai, R. (2015). Between Insanity and Love. In: Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick (Ed.), Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP. Paper presented at ETHICOMP 2015 (pp. 154-158).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between Insanity and Love
2015 (English)In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick, 2015, p. 154-158Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Technology has opened up more opportunities to find bet- ter partners, especially via online dating sites . In addition, technology related to love and sex currently goes far beyond online dating sites. Technology influences our intimate life more and more. Media started to pick up romantic rela- tionship between human beings and digital characters of- ten. Furthermore, today, many wearable devices to experi- ence virtual sex have come into the market. And also robots designed for having a sex with human beings are being de- veloped rapidly. Some might claim having a sex without love or without reproduction is just totally pointless. Or, having a sex with robots is totally “insane”. But apparently there are big market needs, and modern technology seems to be able to satisfy them. This paper explores how it is possible for us to feeling love or sexual desire for non-organic objects by conducting the interview survey, and also considers why people want to have technology for satisfying sexual desire from a philosophical perspective. 

National Category
Gender Studies Ethics Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267915 (URN)
Conference
ETHICOMP 2015
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2015-11-28 Created: 2015-11-28 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Asai, R. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2015). Ethical Competence and Social Responsibility in Scientific Research using ICT Tools. In: Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle (Ed.), Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP. Paper presented at ETHICOMP 2015 (pp. 345-347). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical Competence and Social Responsibility in Scientific Research using ICT Tools
2015 (English)In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 345-347Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study explores how to improve and support researchers'ethical competence in scientic research and how to conduct research ethically, especially in research activities using Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Refining research ethics relating to ICT is unavoidable in the highly technological society of today, for example big data is used in different scientic research activities, and systems which support our daily lives are constructed based on the existing systems. In other words, technology reproduces technology itself. And almost all research activities need to use ICT through the whole research process. Moreover, researchers are required to be able to participate and react sensibly in ethical dialogues with society and citizens. Seen in that light, this study could be applicable not only to computer science and technology but also to a broad spectrum of research areas as the constructive notions of ethics, liberty and responsibility in research activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2015
Series
ACM SIGCAS Computers and Society Newsletter, ISSN 0095-2737
Keywords
Autonomy, decision making, ethical competence, ethical guidelines, research ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266791 (URN)10.1145/2874239.2874290 (DOI)
Conference
ETHICOMP 2015
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Kavathatzopoulos, I., Lennerfors, T., Laaksoharju, M., Asai, R. & Björk, I. (2015). Etikutbildning för ingenjörer: Övningar, verktyg, metoder. In: Stefan Pålsson (Ed.), 5:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges Ingenjörsutbildningar: . Paper presented at 5:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges Ingenjörsutbildningar; 18–19 november 2015, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Uppsala universitet (pp. 30-31). Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etikutbildning för ingenjörer: Övningar, verktyg, metoder
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2015 (Swedish)In: 5:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges Ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Stefan Pålsson, Uppsala universitet, 2015, p. 30-31Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

En utbildning i etik som ska träna studenter att själva hantera etiska problem måste utgå ifrån klassisk filosofi och från etikpsykologisk forskning i problemlösning och beslutsfattande. Utbildningen ska koncentrera sig på praktiskt arbete och seminarier med egna verkliga etiska dilemman. Målet är utveckling av förmågan att lösa etiska problem, tolka och tillämpa viktiga principer och regler, och delta aktivt i dialog med andra intressenter. I workshopen kommer vi att visa metoder, verktyg och övningar som vi använder i våra etikkurser för ingenjörer och teknologer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala universitet, 2015
Keywords
Ingenjörsutbildning, etik, didaktik, utbildning, kurs, övning, verktyg, metod
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Didactics Pedagogy Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268314 (URN)
Conference
5:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges Ingenjörsutbildningar; 18–19 november 2015, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Uppsala universitet
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2015). Judging the complexity of privacy, openness and loyalty issues. In: Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle (Ed.), Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP. Paper presented at ETHICOMP 2015 (pp. 416-419). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Judging the complexity of privacy, openness and loyalty issues
2015 (English)In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 416-419Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Privacy protection and whistle-blowing are controversial issues. Privacy has to be protected but it hinders access to correct information. Whistle-blowing is necessary for correct decision-making, neutralizing wrong beliefs and preventing crime but it may destabilize groups, institutions and societies, and cause conicts. The question investigated here was whether people judging the controversial issues of privacy and whistle-blowing take a moralistic or a philosophical approach. The hypothesis was that homogeneous responses point to a philosophical approach whereas responses correlated with cultural background point to a moralistic approach. Participants' responses to a questionnaire on Manning and Snowden cases did not produce an unambiguous picture, and this result did not lead to a decisive answer to our hypothesis question.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2015
Series
ACM SIGCAS Computers and Society Newsletter, ISSN 0095-2737
Keywords
Culture, decision-making, ethics, privacy, Edward Snowden, Sweden, Whistle-blowing
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology Media and Communications Political Science Sociology Psychology Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266789 (URN)10.1145/2874239.2874300 (DOI)
Conference
ETHICOMP 2015
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4035-3711

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