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Brown, P., Auster, U., Bergman, J., Fredriksson, J., Kasaba, Y., Mansour, M., . . . Fischer, G. (2019). Meeting the Magnetic Emc Challenges for the In-Situ Field Measurements on the Juice Mission. In: Proceedings of 2019 ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC (Aerospace EMC): . Paper presented at ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC (Aerospace EMC), Budapest, Hungary, May 20-22, 2019. IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the Magnetic Emc Challenges for the In-Situ Field Measurements on the Juice Mission
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of 2019 ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC (Aerospace EMC), IEEE, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) mission features instrument designs tailored to meet the specific challenges of the respective measuring environment, including EMC constraints. We describe the magnetic field science requirements for this mission and show how they drive the EMC requirements on the spacecraft and selected in-situ instrument configurations. We describe the results of two mutual interference campaigns and discuss the design mitigations employed in order to realise in-situ magnetic and electric field data in-flight with the accuracy required to meet very challenging mission science goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2019
National Category
Aerospace Engineering Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402329 (URN)10.23919/AeroEMC.2019.8788942 (DOI)000502726600035 ()978-9-0826-8478-0 (ISBN)
Conference
ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC (Aerospace EMC), Budapest, Hungary, May 20-22, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Snögren, P., Berglund, M. & Persson, A. (2016). Combined pressure and flow sensor integrated in a split-ring resonator microplasma source. Applied Physics Letters, 109(17), Article ID 173508.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined pressure and flow sensor integrated in a split-ring resonator microplasma source
2016 (English)In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 109, no 17, article id 173508Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Monitoring and control of the principal properties of a discharge or plasma is vital in many applications, and sensors for measuring them must be integrated close to the plasma source in order to deliver reliable results. This is particularly important, and challenging, in miniaturized systems, where different compatibility issues sets the closest level of integration. In this paper, a sensor for simultaneous measurement of the pressure and flow through a stripline split-ring resonator microplasma source is presented. The sensor utilize fully integrated electrodes positioned upstream and downstream of the microplasma source to study these parameters, and was found to deliver uniform and unambiguous results in a pressure and flow range of 1-6 Torr and 1-15 sccm, respectively. Furthermore, hysteresis and drift in the measurements was found to be mitigated by introducing a resistor in parallel with the plasma, in order to facilitate discharging of the electrodes. Combined, the results show that the sensor is fully compatible with miniaturized microfluidic systems in general, and a system for optogalvanic spectroscopy in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2016
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308609 (URN)10.1063/1.4966185 (DOI)000387258300046 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-11-29 Created: 2016-11-29 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Berglund, M., Khaji, Z., Klintberg, L., Persson, A., Sturesson, P., Söderberg Breivik, J. & Thornell, G. (2016). Extreme-temperature lab on a chip for optogalvanic spectroscopy of ultra small samples – key components and a first integration attempt. In: IOP (Ed.), 27th Micromechanics And Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2016): . Paper presented at 27th Micromechanics and Microsystems Europe (MME) Workshop, Aug 28-30, 2016, Cork, Ireland. Institute of Physics (IOP), 757, Article ID 012029.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme-temperature lab on a chip for optogalvanic spectroscopy of ultra small samples – key components and a first integration attempt
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2016 (English)In: 27th Micromechanics And Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2016) / [ed] IOP, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2016, Vol. 757, article id 012029Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This is a short summary of the authors’ recent R&D on valves, combustors, plasma sources, and pressure and temperature sensors, realized in high-temperature co-fired ceramics, and an account for the first attempt to monolithically integrate them to form a lab on a chip for sample administration, preparation and analysis, as a stage in optogalvanic spectroscopy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics (IOP), 2016
Series
Journal of Physics: Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596 ; 757
National Category
Materials Engineering Other Engineering and Technologies
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Advanced Instrumentation and Measurements
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309931 (URN)10.1088/1742-6596/757/1/012029 (DOI)000439687000029 ()
Conference
27th Micromechanics and Microsystems Europe (MME) Workshop, Aug 28-30, 2016, Cork, Ireland
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Sturesson, P., Berglund, M., Söderberg, J., Klintberg, L., Persson, A. & Thornell, G. (2016). Fabrication of Suspended All-Metal Sensor Elements in Ceramic Laminates. In: Proc. of Micronano System Workshop 2016, Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016: . Paper presented at Micronano System Workshop (MSW2016) Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fabrication of Suspended All-Metal Sensor Elements in Ceramic Laminates
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2016 (English)In: Proc. of Micronano System Workshop 2016, Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

To target a wide range of high-temperature applications [1-4], the Ångström Space Technology Centre has added High-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics, HTTC, technology to its repertoire. Usually, this technology follows a processing scheme where thin sheets of green-body ceramics are metallized through screen printing and structured by embossing, punching or milling, before they are laminated and sintered to form components. A limitation with this, is the difficulty of realizing freely suspended metal structures, which is a disadvantage in, e.g., the fabrication of calorimetric sensors or electric field probes. In this work, the embedding of platinum wires in HTCC is explored experimentally, and demonstrated for use in pressure and plasma I-V sensing.

Keywords
Microsensors, Bond WIre, Harsh Environments, High Temperatures, Ceramic Systems
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microwave Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309945 (URN)
Conference
Micronano System Workshop (MSW2016) Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-16
Persson, A., Berglund, M., Khaji, Z., Sturesson, P., Söderberg, J. & Thornell, G. (2016). Optogalvanic spectroscopy with microplasma sources – Current status and development towards lab on a chip. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 26(10), Article ID 104003.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optogalvanic spectroscopy with microplasma sources – Current status and development towards lab on a chip
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 26, no 10, article id 104003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Miniaturized optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) shows excellent prospects of becoming ahighly sensitive method for gas analysis in micro total analysis systems. Here, a status reporton the current development of microwave induced microplasma sources for OGS is presented,together with the first comparison of the sensitivity of the method to conventional single-passabsorption spectroscopy. The studied microplasma sources are stripline split-ring resonators(SSRRs), with typical ring radii between 3.5 and 6 mm and operation frequencies around2.6 GHz. A linear response (R2 = 0.9999), and a stability of more than 100 s are demonstratedwhen using the microplasma source as an optogalvanic detector. Additionally, saturationeffects at laser powers higher than 100 mW are observed, and the temporal response of theplasma to periodic laser perturbation with repletion rates between 20 Hz and 200 Hz arestudied. Finally, the potential of integrating additional functionality with the detector isdiscussed, with the particular focus on a pressure sensor and a miniaturized combustor toallow for studies of solid samples.

Keywords
Optogalvanic spectroscopy, split-ring resonator, microplasma sources
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284627 (URN)10.1088/0960-1317/26/10/104003 (DOI)000384028900003 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 104/14
Note

Awaiting publication online. 

Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Persson, A. & Berglund, M. (2016). Spatial distribution of the optogalvanic signal in a microplasma detector for lab-on-a-chip gas analysis. Laser Physics Letters, 13(7), Article ID 075703.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial distribution of the optogalvanic signal in a microplasma detector for lab-on-a-chip gas analysis
2016 (English)In: Laser Physics Letters, ISSN 1612-2011, E-ISSN 1612-202X, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 075703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gas sensors are characterized by their sensitivity and selectivity. This is preferably combined with versatility, where the selectivity can be altered, without complex modifications and whiteout losing sensitivity. If aimed at lab-on-a-chip applications, the sensor also must be able to analyze small samples. Today, sensors combining selectivity and versatility for chip-level gas analysis are scarce; however, this paper investigates how miniaturized optogalvanic spectroscopy can fill this gap. By studying the spatial distribution of the optogalvanic signal inside a microplasma, it is shown that the signal is generated in the minuscule gas volume of the sheath surrounding the plasma probe that collects it. Nevertheless, a strong and stable spectroscopic signal can be extracted from the sheath, and the sample concentrations can be calculated using straightforward plasma theory. The minimum detectable absorption and the noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of the system are estimated to be less than 1.4  ×  10−9 Hz−0.5 and 2.8  ×  10−9 cm−1 Hz−0.5, respectively, without cavity enhancement. Combined with inherited versatility from absorption spectroscopy and the capability of handling sub-nanogram samples, this makes optogalvanic spectrometry an excellent candidate for future lab-on-a-chip gas analyzers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics (IOP), 2016
Keywords
Optogalvanic spectroscopy, Split-ring resonator, Microplasma source
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297200 (URN)10.1088/1612-2011/13/7/075703 (DOI)000378845600019 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 104/14
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Gurgurewicz, J., Mège, D., Grygorczuk, J., Wiśniewski, Ł., Berglund, M., Carrère, V., . . . Zubko, N. (2016). Studying the composition of Phobos' surface using HOPTER (Highland Terrain Hopper). In: : . Paper presented at Phobos MMX Science Workshop.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying the composition of Phobos' surface using HOPTER (Highland Terrain Hopper)
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294422 (URN)
Conference
Phobos MMX Science Workshop
Available from: 2016-05-20 Created: 2016-05-20 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved
Berglund, M., Persson, A. & Thornell, G. (2015). Evaluation of dielectric properties of HTCC alumina for realization of plasma sources. Journal of Electronic Materials, 44(10), 3654-3660
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of dielectric properties of HTCC alumina for realization of plasma sources
2015 (English)In: Journal of Electronic Materials, ISSN 0361-5235, E-ISSN 1543-186X, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 3654-3660Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the sensitivity of optogalvanic spectroscopy based on prototype microplasma sources increases, contamination from composite materials in the printed circuit board used starts to become a concern. In this paper, a transfer to high-temperature cofired alumina and platinum is made and evaluated. The high-purity alumina provides an inert plasma environment, and allows for temperatures above 1000A degrees C, which is beneficial for future integration of a combustor. To facilitate the design of high-end plasma sources, characterization of the radio frequency (RF) parameters of the materials around 2.6 GHz is carried out. A RF resonator structure was fabricated in both microstrip and stripline configurations. These resonators were geometrically and electrically characterized, and epsilon (r) and tan were calculated using the RF waveguide design tool Wcalc. The resulting epsilon (r) for the microstrip and stripline was found to be 10.68 (+/- 0.12) and 9.65 (+/- 0.14), respectively. The average tan of all devices was found to be 0.0011 (+/- 0.0007). With these parameters, a series of proof-of-concept plasma sources were fabricated and evaluated. Some problems in the fabrication stemmed from the lamination and difficulties with the screen-printing, but a functioning plasma source was demonstrated.

National Category
Ceramics Engineering and Technology Physical Sciences
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251300 (URN)10.1007/s11664-015-3901-7 (DOI)000360672900061 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Berglund, M., Sturesson, P., Thornell, G. & Persson, A. (2015). Manufacturing Miniature Langmuir probes by Fusing Platinum Bond Wires. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 25(10), Article ID 105012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manufacturing Miniature Langmuir probes by Fusing Platinum Bond Wires
2015 (English)In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 25, no 10, article id 105012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a novel method for manufacturing microscopic Langmuir probes with spherical tips from platinum bond wires for plasma characterization in microplasma sources by fusing. Here, the resulting endpoints, formed by droplets of a fused wire, are intended to act as a spherical Langmuir probe. For studying the fusing behavior, bond wires were wedge-bonded over a 2 mm wide slit, to emulate the final application, and fused at different currents and voltages. For electrical isolation, a set of wires were coated with a 4 µm thick layer of Parylene before they were fused. After fusing, the gap size, as well as the shape and area of the ends of the remaining stubs were measured. The yield of the process was also investigated, and the fusing event was studied using a high-speed camera for analyzing the dynamics of fusing. Four characteristic tip shapes were observed: spherical, semi-spherical, serpentine shaped and folded. The stub length leveled out at ~420µm. The fusing of the coated wires required a higher power for attaining a spherical shape. Finally, a Parylene coated bond wire was integrated into a stripline split-ring resonator (SSRR) microplasma source, and fused to form two Langmuir probes with spherical endpoints. These probes were used for measuring the I-V characteristics of a plasma generated by the SSRR. In a voltage range between -60 V and 60 V, the fused stubs exhibited the expected behavior of spherical Langmuir probes and will be considered for future integration.

Keywords
Langmuir probe; bond wire; fusing; microplasma source
National Category
Physical Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251306 (URN)10.1088/0960-1317/25/10/105012 (DOI)000366827400028 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Berglund, M. (2015). Miniature Plasma Sources for High-Precision Molecular Spectroscopy in Planetary Exploration. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miniature Plasma Sources for High-Precision Molecular Spectroscopy in Planetary Exploration
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The prospect of finding life outside Earth has fascinated mankind for ages, and new technology continuously pushes the boundary of how remote and how obscure evidence we can find. Employing smaller, or completely new, types of landers and robots, and equipping them with miniature instruments would indeed revolutionize exploration of other planets and moons.

In this thesis, microsystems technology is used to create a miniature high-precision isotope-resolving molecular spectrometer utilizing the optogalvanic effect. The heart of the instrument, as well as this thesis, is a microplasma source.

The plasma source is a split-ring resonator, chosen for its simplicity, pressure range and easily accessible plasma, and modified to fit the challenging application, e.g., by the adding of an additional ground plane for improved electromagnetic shielding, and the integration of microscopic plasma probes to extract the pristine optogalvanic signal.

Plasma sources of this kind have been manufactured in both printed circuit board and alumina, the latter for its chemical inertness and for compatibility with other devices in a total analysis system. From previous studies, classical optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS), although being very sensitive, is known to suffer from stability and reproducibility issues. In this thesis several studies were conducted to investigate and improve these shortcomings, and to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, extensive work was put into understanding the underlying physics of the technique.

The plasma sources developed here, are the first ever miniature devices to be used in OGS, and exhibits several benefits compared to traditional solutions. Furthermore, it has been confirmed that OGS scales well with miniaturization. For example, the signal strength does not decrease as the volume is reduced like in regular absorption spectroscopy. Moreover, the stability and reproducibility are greatly increased, in some cases as much as by two orders of magnitude, compared with recent studies made on a classical OGS setup. The signal-to-noise ratio has also been greatly improved, e.g., by enclosing the sample cell and by biasing the plasma. Another benefit of a miniature sample cell is the miniscule amount of sample it requires, which can be important in many applications where only small amounts of sample are available.

To conclude: With this work, an important step toward a miniature, yet highly performing, instrument for detection of extraterrestrial life, has been taken.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015. p. 53
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1253
Keywords
MEMS, MST, Optogalvanic Spectroscopy, Molecular Spectroscopy, Split-Ring Resonator, Microplasma
National Category
Physical Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251315 (URN)978-91-554-9245-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-06-05, Polhemsalen, Ångströmlaboratoriet, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2015-07-07
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0832-1848

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