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Di Baldassarre, GiulianoORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8180-4996
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Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Okoli, K., Breinl, K., Mazzoleni, M. & Di Baldassarre, G. (2019). Design Flood Estimation: Exploring the Potentials and Limitations of Two Alternative Approaches. Water, 11(4), Article ID 729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design Flood Estimation: Exploring the Potentials and Limitations of Two Alternative Approaches
2019 (English)In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The design of flood defence structures requires the estimation of flood water levels corresponding to a given probability of exceedance, or return period. In river flood management, this estimation is often done by statistically analysing the frequency of flood discharge peaks. This typically requires three main steps. First, direct measurements of annual maximum water levels at a river cross-section are converted into annual maximum flows by using a rating curve. Second, a probability distribution function is fitted to these annual maximum flows to derive the design peak flow corresponding to a given return period. Third, the design peak flow is used as input to a hydraulic model to derive the corresponding design flood level. Each of these three steps is associated with significant uncertainty that affects the accuracy of estimated design flood levels. Here, we propose a simulation framework to compare this common approach (based on the frequency analysis of annual maximum flows) with an alternative approach based on the frequency analysis of annual maximum water levels. The rationale behind this study is that high water levels are directly measured, and they often come along with less uncertainty than river flows. While this alternative approach is common for storm surge and coastal flooding, the potential of this approach in the context of river flooding has not been sufficiently explored. Our framework is based on the generation of synthetic data to perform a numerical experiment and compare the accuracy and precision of estimated design flood levels based on either annual maximum river flows (common approach) or annual maximum water levels (alternative approach).

Keywords
Design flood, Design flood levels
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390325 (URN)10.3390/w11040729 (DOI)000473105700099 ()
Projects
Hydraulic Engineering
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Nardi, F., Annis, A., Di Baldassarre, G., Vivoni, E. R. & Grimaldi, S. (2019). GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset of Earth's floodplains. Scientific Data, 6, Article ID 180309.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset of Earth's floodplains
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 6, article id 180309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Identifying floodplain boundaries is of paramount importance for earth, environmental and socioeconomic studies addressing riverine risk and resource management. However, to date, a global floodplain delineation using a homogeneous procedure has not been constructed. In this paper, we present the first, comprehensive, high-resolution, gridded dataset of Earth's floodplains at 250-m resolution (GFPLAIN250m). We use the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital terrain model and set of terrain analysis procedures for geomorphic floodplain delineations. The elevation data are processed by a fast geospatial tool for floodplain mapping available for download at https://github.com/fnardi/GFPLAIN. The GFPLAIN250m dataset can support many applications, including flood hazard mapping, habitat restoration, development studies, and the analysis of human-flood interactions. To test the GFPLAIN250m dataset, we perform a consistency analysis with floodplain delineations derived by flood hazard modelling studies in Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375870 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2018.309 (DOI)000455601400001 ()30644852 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 761678
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Gebrehiwot, S. G., Di Baldassarre, G., Bishop, K., Halldin, S. & Breuer, L. (2019). Is observation uncertainty masking the signal of land use change impacts on hydrology?. Journal of Hydrology, 570, 393-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is observation uncertainty masking the signal of land use change impacts on hydrology?
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 570, p. 393-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analysis of hydrological impacts of land use change raises questions about whether, and how much, such impacts are misrepresented because of errors in river flow observations. In this paper, land use change impacts (represented by changes in watershed storage) and different ranges of discharge measurement error are compared to assess how errors in discharge measurement can potentially mask a land use change impact. Using a watershed from the Ethiopian highlands to exemplify this, we simulated five different levels of land use change impacts with five levels of watershed storage reductions (from 10% to 50% change) and the associated time series of runoff. Different levels of observation error were then introduced into these artificial time series. Comparison was made between every pair, i.e. a time series derived from a certain level of land use change (storage reduction) versus a time series corresponding to a given level of observation error, using a step-change t-test. Significant step-changes between pairs define the detectability of land use change impact. The analysis was made for the entire 30-year time series as well as for the most extreme annual weather conditions. The results showed that for the average year and wettest year, 75% or more error in observed discharge masks the maximum simulated land use change impact on hydrology. In dry years, a 50% error in discharge is enough to mask the same impact. Knowing (and improving) the level of data quality contributes to a better understanding of hydrological uncertainties and improves the precision in assessing land use change impacts. Both of these are essential elements in water resources development planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2019
Keywords
Detectability, Discharge, Error range, Watershed storage, Upper-Didesa watershed
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380488 (URN)10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.12.058 (DOI)000460709400031 ()
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Jaramillo, F., Desormeaux, A., Hedlund, J., Jawitz, J. W., Clerici, N., Piemontese, L., . . . Ahlen, I. (2019). Priorities and Interactions of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with Focus on Wetlands. Water, 11(3), Article ID 619.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Priorities and Interactions of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with Focus on Wetlands
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2019 (English)In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 619Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wetlands are often vital physical and social components of a country’s natural capital, as well as providers of ecosystem services to local and national communities. We performed a network analysis to prioritize Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for sustainable development in iconic wetlands and wetlandscapes around the world. The analysis was based on the information and perceptions on 45 wetlandscapes worldwide by 49 wetland researchers of the Global Wetland Ecohydrological Network (GWEN). We identified three 2030 Agenda targets of high priority across the wetlandscapes needed to achieve sustainable development: Target 6.3—“Improve water quality”; 2.4—“Sustainable food production”; and 12.2—“Sustainable management of resources”. Moreover, we found specific feedback mechanisms and synergies between SDG targets in the context of wetlands. The most consistent reinforcing interactions were the influence of Target 12.2 on 8.4—“Efficient resource consumption”; and that of Target 6.3 on 12.2. The wetlandscapes could be differentiated in four bundles of distinctive priority SDG-targets: “Basic human needs”, “Sustainable tourism”, “Environmental impact in urban wetlands”, and “Improving and conserving environment”. In general, we find that the SDG groups, targets, and interactions stress that maintaining good water quality and a “wise use” of wetlandscapes are vital to attaining sustainable development within these sensitive ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
wetlands, wetlandscapes, SDGs, network analysis, sustainable development goals, priorities, interactions
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382994 (URN)10.3390/w11030619 (DOI)000464530100007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-06503Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-740
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Breinl, K. & Di Baldassarre, G. (2019). Space-time disaggregation of precipitation and temperature across different climates and spatial scales. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY-REGIONAL STUDIES, 21, 126-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Space-time disaggregation of precipitation and temperature across different climates and spatial scales
2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY-REGIONAL STUDIES, ISSN 2214-5818, Vol. 21, p. 126-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study region: This study focuses on two study areas: the Province of Trento (Italy; 6200 km(2)), and entire Sweden (447000km(2)). The Province of Trento is a complex mountainous area including subarctic, humid continental and Tundra climates. Sweden, instead, is mainly dominated by a subarctic climate in the North and an oceanic climate in the South. Study focus: Hydrological predictions often require long weather time series of high temporal resolution. Daily observations typically exceed the length of sub-daily observations, and daily gauges are more widely available than sub-daily gauges. The issue can be overcome by disaggregating daily into sub-daily values. We present an open-source tool for the non-parametric space-time disaggregation of daily precipitation and temperature into hourly values called spatial method of fragments (S-MOF). A large number of comparative experiments was conducted for both S-MOF and MOF in the two study regions. New hydrological insights for the region: Our experiments demonstrate the applicability of the univariate and spatial method of fragments in the two temperate/subarctic study regions where snow processes are important. S-MOF is able to produce consistent precipitation and temperature fields at sub-daily resolution with acceptable method related bias. For precipitation, although climatologically more complex, S-MOF generally leads to better results in the Province of Trento than in Sweden, mainly due to the smaller spatial extent of the former region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2019
Keywords
Precipitation, Temperature, Disaggregation, Space-time scaling, Non-parametric, Method of fragments
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377221 (URN)10.1016/j.ejrh.2018.12.002 (DOI)000457248200010 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEU, Horizon 2020, 793558
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Ferdous, M. R., Wesselink, A., Brandimarte, L., Slager, K., Zwarteveen, M. & Di Baldassarre, G. (2019). The Costs of Living with Floods in the Jamuna Floodplain in Bangladesh. Water, 11(6), Article ID 1238.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Costs of Living with Floods in the Jamuna Floodplain in Bangladesh
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2019 (English)In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bangladeshi people use multiple strategies to live with flooding events and associated riverbank erosion. They relocate, evacuate their homes temporarily, change cropping patterns, and supplement their income from migrating household members. In this way, they can reduce the negative impact of floods on their livelihoods. However, these societal responses also have negative outcomes, such as impoverishment. This research collects quantitative household data and analyzes changes of livelihood conditions over recent decades in a large floodplain area in north-west Bangladesh. It is found that while residents cope with flooding events, they do not achieve successful adaptation. With every flooding, people lose income and assets, which they can only partially recover. As such, they are getting poorer, and therefore less able to make structural adjustments that would allow adaptation in the longer term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
flooding, erosion, coping, adaptation, Jamuna River, Bangladesh
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390698 (URN)10.3390/w11061238 (DOI)000475346300126 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 771678
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Bloeschl, G., Bierkens, M. F. P., Chambel, A., Cudennec, C., Destouni, G., Fiori, A., . . . Zhang, Y. (2019). Twenty-three unsolved problems in hydrology (UPH) - a community perspective. Hydrological Sciences Journal, 64(10), 1141-1158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twenty-three unsolved problems in hydrology (UPH) - a community perspective
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2019 (English)In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 64, no 10, p. 1141-1158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is the outcome of a community initiative to identify major unsolved scientific problems in hydrology motivated by a need for stronger harmonisation of research efforts. The procedure involved a public consultation through online media, followed by two workshops through which a large number of potential science questions were collated, prioritised, and synthesised. In spite of the diversity of the participants (230 scientists in total), the process revealed much about community priorities and the state of our science: a preference for continuity in research questions rather than radical departures or redirections from past and current work. Questions remain focused on the process-based understanding of hydrological variability and causality at all space and time scales. Increased attention to environmental change drives a new emphasis on understanding how change propagates across interfaces within the hydrological system and across disciplinary boundaries. In particular, the expansion of the human footprint raises a new set of questions related to human interactions with nature and water cycle feedbacks in the context of complex water management problems. We hope that this reflection and synthesis of the 23 unsolved problems in hydrology will help guide research efforts for some years to come.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
hydrology, science questions, research agenda, interdisciplinary, knowledge gaps
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391022 (URN)10.1080/02626667.2019.1620507 (DOI)000474098900001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Di Baldassarre, G., Nohrstedt, D., Mård, J., Burchardt, S., Albin, C., Bondesson, S., . . . Parker, C. F. (2018). An Integrative Research Framework to Unravel the Interplay of Natural Hazards and Vulnerabilities. Earth's Future, 6(3), 305-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Integrative Research Framework to Unravel the Interplay of Natural Hazards and Vulnerabilities
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2018 (English)In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persistent policy action, and international cooperation. We argue that these dramatic figures call for novel scientific approaches and new types of data collection to integrate the two main approaches that still dominate the science underpinning DRR: the hazard paradigm and the vulnerability paradigm. Building from these two approaches, here we propose a research framework that specifies the scope of enquiry, concepts, and general relations among phenomena. We then discuss the essential steps to advance systematic empirical research and evidence-based DRR policy action. Plain Language Summary The recent deadly earthquake in Iran-Iraq has been yet another reminder of the topicality of natural hazards, and it has come just after an unprecedented series of catastrophic events, including the extensive flooding in South Asia and the string of devastating hurricanes in the Americas. He we identify three main puzzles in the nexus of natural hazards and vulnerabilities, and demonstrate how novel approaches are needed to solve them with reference to a flood risk example. Specifically, we show how a new research framework can guide systematic data collections to advance the fundamental understanding of socionatural interactions, which is an essential step to improve the development of policies for disaster risk reduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Disaster risk reduction, Natural hazards, Vulnerability, Flood risk, Socio-hydrology
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350188 (URN)10.1002/2017EF000764 (DOI)000430171600002 ()
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Di Baldassarre, G., Kreibich, H., Vorogushyn, S., Aerts, J., Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K., Barendrecht, M., . . . Ward, P. J. (2018). Hess Opinions: An interdisciplinary research agenda to explore the unintended consequences of structural flood protection. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 22(11), 5629-5637
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hess Opinions: An interdisciplinary research agenda to explore the unintended consequences of structural flood protection
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2018 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 5629-5637Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One common approach to cope with floods is the implementation of structural flood protection measures, such as levees or flood-control reservoirs, which substantially reduce the probability of flooding at the time of implementation. Numerous scholars have problematized this approach. They have shown that increasing the levels of flood protection can attract more settlements and high-value assets in the areas protected by the new measures. Other studies have explored how structural measures can generate a sense of complacency, which can act to reduce preparedness. These paradoxical risk changes have been described as "levee effect", "safe development paradox" or "safety dilemma". In this commentary, we briefly review this phenomenon by critically analysing the intended benefits and unintended effects of structural flood protection, and then we propose an interdisciplinary research agenda to uncover these paradoxical dynamics of risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH, 2018
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-370025 (URN)10.5194/hess-22-5629-2018 (DOI)000448693500002 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 761678
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Quesada Montano, B., Di Baldassarre, G., Rangecroft, S. & Van Loon, A. (2018). Hydrological change: Towards a consistent approach to assess changes on both floods and droughts. Advances in Water Resources, 111, 31-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrological change: Towards a consistent approach to assess changes on both floods and droughts
2018 (English)In: Advances in Water Resources, ISSN 0309-1708, E-ISSN 1872-9657, Vol. 111, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several studies have found that the frequency, magnitude and spatio-temporal distribution of droughts and floods have significantly increased in many regions of the world. Yet, most of the methods used in detecting trends in hydrological extremes 1) focus on either floods or droughts, and/or 2) base their assessment on characteristics that, even though useful for trend identification, cannot be directly used in decision making, e.g. integrated water resources management and disaster risk reduction. In this paper, we first discuss the need for a consistent approach to assess changes on both floods and droughts, and then propose a method based on the theory of runs and threshold levels. Flood and drought changes were assessed in terms of frequency, length and surplus/deficit volumes. This paper also presents an example application using streamflow data from two hydrometric stations along the Po River basin (Italy), Piacenza and Pontelagoscuro, and then discuss opportunities and challenges of the proposed method.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
hydrological changes; threshold level method; floods; droughts
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330119 (URN)10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.10.038 (DOI)000418592800004 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 54100006
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8180-4996

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