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Olsson, Henrik
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Sjödin, M., Olsson, H., Strietzel, C., Strömme, M. & Qiu, Z. (2015). Mechanisms of Self-discharge in p-doped Conducting Polymers: Implications to the construction of electrical energy storage materials with conducting polymer components. In: : . Paper presented at 249th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, March 22-26, 2015, Denver, CO, Chemistry of Natural Resources.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanisms of Self-discharge in p-doped Conducting Polymers: Implications to the construction of electrical energy storage materials with conducting polymer components
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Physical Chemistry Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-255224 (URN)
Conference
249th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, March 22-26, 2015, Denver, CO, Chemistry of Natural Resources
Available from: 2015-06-15 Created: 2015-06-15 Last updated: 2016-11-30
Olsson, H., Qiu, Z., Strömme, M. & Sjödin, M. (2015). Parallel mechanisms of polypyrrole self-discharge in aqueous media. Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, 17, 11014-11019
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parallel mechanisms of polypyrrole self-discharge in aqueous media
2015 (English)In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 17, p. 11014-11019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this report we investigate the self-discharge in a positively charged polypyrrole-cellulose composite material in water solution. Rate constants for the self-discharge reaction are determined by potential step methods and their dependence on pH, temperature and applied potential are reported. Based on the results, we propose that two fundamentally different self-discharge mechanisms operate in parallel; one of faradaic origin with a rate constant increasing exponentially with applied potential and one mechanism comprising an initial reaction of the charged polymer with hydroxide ions. The second mechanism dominates at high pH as the rate constant for this reaction increases exponentially with pH whilst the faradaic reaction dominates at low pH. With this report we hope to shed light on the complex and elusive nature of self-discharge in conducting polymers to serve as guidance for the construction of electrical energy storage devices with conducting polymer components.

National Category
Nano Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248590 (URN)10.1039/C4CP05355A (DOI)000352707200078 ()
Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Olsson, H., Berg, E. J., Strömme, M. & Sjödin, M. (2015). Self-discharge in positively charged polypyrrole-cellulose composite electrodes. Electrochemistry communications, 50, 43-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-discharge in positively charged polypyrrole-cellulose composite electrodes
2015 (English)In: Electrochemistry communications, ISSN 1388-2481, E-ISSN 1873-1902, Vol. 50, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-discharge is one of the most critical issues to address to allow for industrialization of conducting polymer (CP) based electric energy storage devices. The present work investigates the underlying cause of self-discharge in positively charged polypyrrole (PPy), which is one of the most frequently studied CPs for such devices. The analyzed material is a composite of PPy and cellulose from Cladophora sp. algae forming a free standing paper-like material. From the time dependence of the potential decay as well as from independent spectroelectrochemical investigations the decay was attributed to a kinetically limiting Faradaic reaction, intrinsic to the polymer, forming a reactive intermediate that irreversibly reacts with its surroundings in a kinetically non-limiting following reaction. As such, nucleophilic addition of electrolyte nudeophiles is not found to be rate-determining. These results provide insight into the self-discharge phenomenon in p-doped CPs, and information regarding the potential range in which CPs can operate with insignificant self-discharge.

Keywords
Polypyrrole, Self-discharge, Activation-controlled Faradaic reaction, Stability, Maleimide, Degradation
National Category
Chemical Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245195 (URN)10.1016/j.elecom.2014.11.004 (DOI)000348260200011 ()
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Olsson, H., Strömme, M., Nyholm, L. & Sjödin, M. (2014). Activation Barriers Provide Insight into the Mechanism of Self-Discharge in Polypyrrole. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 118(51), 29643-29649
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activation Barriers Provide Insight into the Mechanism of Self-Discharge in Polypyrrole
2014 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 118, no 51, p. 29643-29649Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conducting polymers are envisioned to play a significant role in the development of organic matter based electrical energy conversion and storage systems. However, successful utilization of conducting polymers relies on a fundamental understanding of their inherent possibilities and limitations. In this report we studied the temperature dependence of the self-discharge in polypyrrole and show that the rate of self-discharge is kinetically controlled by a polymer intrinsic endergonic electron transfer reaction forming a reactive intermediate. We further show that this intermediate is intimately linked to a process known as overoxidation. This process is general for most, if not all, p-doped conducting polymers irrespective of medium. The results herein are therefore expected to significantly impact the development of future energy storage systems with conducting polymer based components.

National Category
Physical Chemistry Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-243681 (URN)10.1021/jp510690p (DOI)000347360200021 ()
Available from: 2015-02-19 Created: 2015-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Olsson, H., Tammela, P., Wang, Z., Carlsson, D. O., Sjödin, M., Mihranyan, A., . . . Nyholm, L. (2014). Energy Storage with Nanocellulose and Polypyrrole. In: 1st International Symposium on Energy Challenges and Mechanics: . Paper presented at 1st International Symposium on Energy Challenges and Mechanics, 8-10 July, 2014, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy Storage with Nanocellulose and Polypyrrole
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2014 (English)In: 1st International Symposium on Energy Challenges and Mechanics, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Nano Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239796 (URN)
Conference
1st International Symposium on Energy Challenges and Mechanics, 8-10 July, 2014, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
Available from: 2014-12-30 Created: 2014-12-30 Last updated: 2016-11-30
Olsson, H. (2014). Nanocomposites of Cellulose and Conducting Polymer for Electrical Energy Storage. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanocomposites of Cellulose and Conducting Polymer for Electrical Energy Storage
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The world’s increased energy storage demand, as well as the environmental concerns related to the combustion of fossil fuels, has triggered a transition to intermittent renewable energy sources as well as to electrical and hybrid vehicles. Current day rechargeable batteries are, due to the invention and development of lithium ion batteries, technologically well positioned to answer to some of these demands. Conventional batteries, however, utilize inorganic materials of limited supply that require large amounts of energy during refining and processing. The materials also add a significant cost to the final product, making the rechargeable batteries less attractive for large scale applications. During the last decade, significant efforts have been made to find suitable organic matter based electrode materials that can replace the inorganic materials. One class of organic materials that can be used for electrical energy storage, or be included as components in organic matter based energy storage systems, is conducting polymers.

The aim of this thesis was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using the conducting polymer polypyrrole in energy storage applications. The polymer was synthesized onto cellulose extracted from the Cladophora sp. algae, and the result was a flexible composite material. Symmetrical energy storage devices constructed with the composite material were shown to exhibit a pseudocapacitive behavior. The resistance in the cells was investigated and was found to scale linearly with the separator thickness. Cells could be cycled for 4,000 cycles without significant capacitance loss and cells that were overcharged to 1.8 V cell potential, were found to be protected by a resistive potential drop. Devices were constructed as proof-of-concept and were used to power a remote control and a digital thermometer.

The self-discharge in polypyrrole was studied extensively. It was found that oxygen was responsible for the oxidation of the reduced electrode, while the positive electrode self-discharged due to a faradaic reaction. Through spectroscopy and the temperature dependence of the self-discharge, it was suggested that the self-discharge of oxidized polypyrrole is linked to the degradation at high potentials, commonly referred to as overoxidation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014. p. 60
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1125
Keywords
Polypyrrole, Nanocomposites, Energy storage, Conducting polymers, Cellulose
National Category
Nano Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-218815 (URN)978-91-554-8883-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-04-04, Å4001, Ångströmlaboratoriet, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, Uppsala, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-02-18 Last updated: 2014-04-29
Sjödin, M., Karlsson, C., Huang, H., Olsson, H., Yang, L., Gogoll, A., . . . Strömme, M. (2014). Organic Battery Materials based on Conducting Polymer Backbones with High Capacity Pending Groups. In: : . Paper presented at 247th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Chemistry & Materials for Energy, March 16-20, 2014, Dallas, Texas. , 247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organic Battery Materials based on Conducting Polymer Backbones with High Capacity Pending Groups
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Organic matter based battery materials have attracted large interest due to their inherent ability to provide an environmentally benign alternative to inorganic batteries because such materials can be produced from renewable resources via eco-efficient processes. The development of organic battery materials rely on several key factors that need to be resolved, the most important being dissolution problems, limited electronic conductivity, degradation of active material and slow redox kinetics. Conducting polymers are insoluble in most electrolytes, they are electronically conducting and show fast redox conversion but are, to some extent, unstable and have insufficient charge capacities for battery applications.

            To understand the instability of conducting polymers we have measured self discharge rates in polypyrrole at different temperatures. From these experiments it is clear that the self-discharge originates from an activated redox reaction with an activation barrier of around 0.4 eV. Although the exact nature of the redox reaction has not been identified we have been able to link the self discharge to, what is commonly referred to as, over-oxidation. Over-oxidation is common to polyacetylene, polyparaphenylene, polypyrrole and polythiophene and this mechanism of self discharge is thus a general feature of conducting polymers. This self-discharge mechanism is suppressed by low polymer doping levels, low potentials and low temperatures.     

By attaching high capacity redox active groups onto the conducting polymer backbone the charge capacity can be increased while retaining electronic conductivity and insolubility. We have attached quinone groups to each repeat unit of polypyrrole for this purpose. Interestingly, in-situ spectroscopic measurements show that during quinone redox conversion the polymer doping level is in-fact reduced. Since the doping level of the polymer affects the rate of self-discharge the attachment of quinone units to the polypyrrole chain not only increases the charge capacity but also provides a conceptual strategy to control self discharge. 

National Category
Physical Chemistry Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232675 (URN)000348457600168 ()
Conference
247th ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Chemistry & Materials for Energy, March 16-20, 2014, Dallas, Texas
Note

Meeting Abstract: 434-ENFL

Available from: 2014-09-22 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Olsson, H., Karlsson, C., Strømme, M., Sjödin, M. & Nyholm, L. (2014). Study of the Self-Discharge Mechanism in Polypyrrole. In: : . Paper presented at GradSAM21, Uppsala.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Study of the Self-Discharge Mechanism in Polypyrrole
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Nano Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-218811 (URN)
Conference
GradSAM21, Uppsala
Available from: 2014-02-18 Created: 2014-02-18 Last updated: 2017-01-25
Karlsson, C., Olsson, H. & Sjödin, M. (2013). Electric Energy Storage: Conducting Redox Polymers. In: : . Paper presented at SweGRIDS 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electric Energy Storage: Conducting Redox Polymers
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Nano Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211357 (URN)
Conference
SweGRIDS 2013
Available from: 2013-11-22 Created: 2013-11-22 Last updated: 2017-01-25
Karlsson, C., Huang, H., Olsson, H., Strømme, M., Gogoll, A. & Sjödin, M. (2013). Kinetics of conducting polymers with side chain quinone units. In: : . Paper presented at 223rd Meeting of The Electrochemical Society.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinetics of conducting polymers with side chain quinone units
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Quinones have been suggested as active material in organic lithium ion battery (LIB) cathodes. They are expected to have higher specific capacities and to be cheaper and more environmentally friendly than the inorganic lithium intercalation compounds used in LIBs today. However, quinone compounds suggested for this purpose often suffer from slow kinetics and low cyclability due to dissolution. In this work, conducting polymers containing pending quinone moieties were synthesized. Immobilizing the redox active quinone units on a conducting polymer matrix decreases both resistance and solubility, which improves the speed and the cyclability of the system, while maintaining a high specific capacity. The two-electron redox reaction of the quinone units in these polymers yields a theoretical capacity of ~300 mAh/g. The polymers were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically to elucidate the kinetics of the polymer charging and the redox cycling of the quinone units.

National Category
Physical Chemistry Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-202084 (URN)
Conference
223rd Meeting of The Electrochemical Society
Available from: 2013-06-19 Created: 2013-06-19 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved
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