uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Nessen, T., Opava, C. H., Martin, C. & Demmelmaier, I. (2019). Physiotherapists' management of challenging situations in guiding people with rheumatoid arthritis to health-enhancing physical activity. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 35(1), 31-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiotherapists' management of challenging situations in guiding people with rheumatoid arthritis to health-enhancing physical activity
2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To explore strategies used by physiotherapists (PTs) in guiding people with rheumatoid arthritis to health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) in a group setting during a 1-year intervention study.

Methods: Exploratory design with qualitative video analysis performed in three steps. Eleven female PTs were video recorded while leading support group sessions aiming at facilitating HEPA (twice-weekly exercise sessions at public gyms and 150 weekly minutes of moderately intense aerobic physical activity).

Results: Three categories of challenging situations emerged. They occurred when the HEPA intervention participants reported barriers to performing physical activity, when they neglected to use the planning tool for physical activity as intended in the program, and when they received negative results from physical capacity tests. PTs used different strategies to manage these challenges, with main focus either on information-giving, corresponding to a traditional health professional approach, or utilizing group resources by organizing participation.

Conclusions: This study provides detailed descriptions of PTs’ clinical behavior in video-recorded sessions. The results imply that motivated PTs can, despite their biomedical and practitioner-focused training, learn to adapt their communication strategies to different situations, altering between traditional information-giving and utilizing group resources by organizing participation.

Keywords
Behavior change, health professionals, clinical practice
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381392 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2018.1434847 (DOI)000461795500003 ()29447492 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Rheumatism Association
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Tuvemo Johnson, S., Martin, C., Anens, E., Johansson, A.-C. & Hellström, K. (2018). Older adults' opinions on fall prevention in relation to physical activity level. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 37(1), 58-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adults' opinions on fall prevention in relation to physical activity level
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 58-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe older adults' opinions regarding actions to prevent falls and to analyze differences in the opinions of highly versus less physically active older adults. An open-ended question was answered by 262 individuals aged 75 to 98 years living in the community. The answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, and differences in the categories were compared between highly and less physically active persons. Physical activity was measured according to a five-level scale. The content analysis resulted in eight categories: assistive devices, avoiding hazards, behavioral adaptive strategies, being physically active, healthy lifestyle, indoor modifications, outdoor modifications, and seeking assistance. Behavioral adaptive strategies were mentioned to a greater extent by highly active people, and indoor modifications were more often mentioned by less active older adults. Support for active self-directed behavioral strategies might be important for fall prevention among less physically active older adults.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278203 (URN)10.1177/0733464815624776 (DOI)000417697100005 ()26769824 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Bring, A., Martin, C. & Åsenlöf, P. (2016). A New Core Curriculum For Integration Of Behavioural Medicine And Physiotherapy In Graduate Studies: Planning, Implementation, And Expected Outcomes. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23, S18-S18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Core Curriculum For Integration Of Behavioural Medicine And Physiotherapy In Graduate Studies: Planning, Implementation, And Expected Outcomes
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S18-S18Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313850 (URN)000388943400062 ()
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Emilson, C., Åsenlöf, P., Pettersson, S., Bergman, S., Sandborgh, M., Martin, C. & Demmelmaier, I. (2016). Physical therapists' assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: direct observations in primary health care. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 17, Article ID 316.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical therapists' assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: direct observations in primary health care
Show others...
2016 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Behavioral medicine (BM) treatment is recommended to be implemented for pain management in physical therapy. Its implementation requires physical therapists (PTs), who are skilled at performing functional behavioral analyses based on physical, psychological and behavioral assessments. The purpose of the current study was to explore and describe PTs' assessments, analyses and their use of behavioral change techniques (BCTs) in initial consultations with patients who seek primary health care due to musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A descriptive and explorative research design was applied, using data from video recordings of 12 primary health care PTs. A deductive analysis was performed, based on a specific protocol with definitions of PTs' assessment of physical and psychological prognostic factors (red and yellow flags, respectively), analysis of the clinical problem, and use of BCTs. An additional inductive analysis was performed to identify and describe the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. Results: Red and yellow flags were assessed in a majority of the cases. Analyses were mainly based on biomedical assessments and none of the PTs performed functional behavioral analyses. All of the PTs used BCTs, mainly instruction and information, to facilitate physical activity and improved posture. The four most clinically relevant cases were selected to illustrate the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. The results are based on 12 experienced primary health care PTs in Sweden, limiting the generalizability to similar populations and settings. Conclusion: Red and yellow flags were assessed by PTs in the current study, but their interpretation and integration of the findings in analyses and treatment were incomplete, indicating a need of further strategies to implement behavioral medicine in Swedish primary health care physical therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
National Category
Orthopaedics Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319411 (URN)10.1186/s12891-016-1173-x (DOI)000395014000001 ()27464877 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Rheumatism Association
Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Emilson, C., Åsenlöf, P., Pettersson, S., Bergman, S., Sandborgh, M., Martin, C. & Demmelmaier, I. (2016). Physical Therapists' Assessments, Analyses And Use Of Behavioral Change Techniques In Initial Consultations On Musculoskeletal Pain: Direct Observations In Primary Health Care. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23, S187-S187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Therapists' Assessments, Analyses And Use Of Behavioral Change Techniques In Initial Consultations On Musculoskeletal Pain: Direct Observations In Primary Health Care
Show others...
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, p. S187-S187Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313852 (URN)000388943400587 ()
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Revenas, A., Martin, C., Opava, C. H., Brusewitz, M., Keller, C. & Asenlof, P. (2015). A Mobile Internet Service for Self-Management of Physical Activity in People With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Challenges in Advancing the Co-Design Process During the Requirements Specification Phase. JMIR Research Protocols, 4(3), Article ID UNSP e111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mobile Internet Service for Self-Management of Physical Activity in People With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Challenges in Advancing the Co-Design Process During the Requirements Specification Phase
Show others...
2015 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 4, no 3, article id UNSP e111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: User involvement in the development of health care services is important for the viability, usability, and effectiveness of services. This study reports on the second step of the co-design process. Objective: The aim was to explore the significant challenges in advancing the co-design process during the requirements specification phase of a mobile Internet service for the self-management of physical activity (PA) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: A participatory action research design was used to involve lead users and stakeholders as co-designers. Lead users (n=5), a clinical physiotherapist (n=1), researchers (n=2) with knowledge in PA in RA and behavioral learning theories, an eHealth strategist (n=1), and an officer from the patient organization (n=1) collaborated in 4 workshops. Data-collection methods included video recordings and naturalistic observations. Results: The inductive qualitative video-based analysis resulted in 1 overarching theme, merging perspectives, and 2 subthemes reflecting different aspects of merging: (1) finding a common starting point and (2) deciding on design solutions. Seven categories illustrated the specific challenges: reaching shared understanding of goals, clarifying and handling the complexity of participants' roles, clarifying terminology related to system development, establishing the rationale for features, negotiating features, transforming ideas into concrete features, and participants' alignment with the agreed goal and task. Conclusions: Co-designing the system requirements of a mobile Internet service including multiple stakeholders was a complex and extensive collaborative decision-making process. Considering, valuing, counterbalancing, and integrating different perspectives into agreements and solutions (ie, the merging of participants' perspectives) were cmcial for moving the process forward and were considered the core challenges of co-design. Further research is needed to replicate the results and to increase knowledge on key factors for a successful co-design of health care services.

Keywords
eHealth, participatory design, rheumatoid arthritis, user involvement, video observations
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267076 (URN)10.2196/resprot.4824 (DOI)000362730300024 ()26381221 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-20 Created: 2015-11-17 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Biquet, G., Lindquist, I., Martin, C. & Pettersson, A. (2015). Att lära och utvecklas i sin profession (1:1ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att lära och utvecklas i sin profession
2015 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2015. p. 215 Edition: 1:1
Keywords
Kontinuerlig professionell utveckling
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-289263 (URN)978-91-44-09245-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved
Martin, C. (2015). Att stimulera lärande i undervisning (1:1ed.). In: Att lära och utvecklas i sin profession: (pp. 147-168). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att stimulera lärande i undervisning
2015 (Swedish)In: Att lära och utvecklas i sin profession, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2015, 1:1, p. 147-168Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2015 Edition: 1:1
Keywords
lärande, pedagogik, undervisning
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-289266 (URN)978-91-44-09245-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2017-10-20Bibliographically approved
Revenäs, Å., Opava, C. H., Martin, C., Demmelmaier, I., Keller, C. & Åsenlöf, P. (2015). Development of a web-based and mobile app to support physical activity in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis: results from the second step of a co-design process. JMIR Research Protocols, 4(1), Article ID e22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a web-based and mobile app to support physical activity in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis: results from the second step of a co-design process
Show others...
2015 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Long-term adherence to physical activity recommendations remains challenging for most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite evidence for its health benefits.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide basic data on system requirement specifications for a Web-based and mobile app to self-manage physical activity. More specifically, we explored the target user group, features of the future app, and correlations between the system requirements and the established behavior change techniques (BCTs).

METHODS: We used a participatory action research design. Qualitative data were collected using multiple methods in four workshops. Participants were 5 individuals with RA, a clinical physiotherapist, an officer from the Swedish Rheumatism Association, a Web designer, and 2 physiotherapy researchers. A taxonomy was used to determine the degree of correlation between the system requirements and established BCTs.

RESULTS: Participants agreed that the future Web-based and mobile app should be based on two major components important for maintaining physical activity: (1) a calendar feature for goal setting, planning, and recording of physical activity performance and progress, and (2) a small community feature for positive feedback and support from peers. All system requirements correlated with established BCTs, which were coded as 24 different BCTs.

CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to involve individuals with RA as co-designers, in collaboration with clinicians, researchers, and Web designers, to produce basic data to generate system requirement specifications for an eHealth service. The system requirements correlated to the BCTs, making specifications of content and future evaluation of effectiveness possible.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281457 (URN)10.2196/resprot.3795 (DOI)000360016500022 ()25665589 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Rastad, C., Martin, C. & Åsenlöf, P. (2014). Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Physical Activity in Patients With Schizophrenia. Physical Therapy, 94(10), 1467-1479
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Physical Activity in Patients With Schizophrenia
2014 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 94, no 10, p. 1467-1479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Patients with schizophrenia have a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death compared with the general population. High prevalence of an unhealthy lifestyle contributes to the increased risk in these patients. Patients with schizophrenia are often physically inactive, and there is limited knowledge on the factors, such as barriers and incentives, that can influence physical activity in this patient group. Objective. The aim was to study the perception and experience of barriers to and incentives for physical activity in daily living in patients with schizophrenia, as reported by the patients themselves. Design. An explorative study applying conventional qualitative content analysis was conducted. Methods. A purposeful sample of 20 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (13 men, 7 women; 22-63 years of age) registered at 3 psychiatric outpatient clinics in Sweden were interviewed using semistructured interviews. Results. The analysis resulted in 3 main themes: (1) barriers-factors that complicate or obstruct physical activity, (2) reward-the motivation for physical activity, and (3) helpful strategies. Limitations. The results may not reflect important factors related to physical activity in older patients (>65 years of age), newly diagnosed patients, or inpatients. Conclusions. In accordance with patients' perceptions, there may be biopsychosocial determinants of physical activity behavior that are unique for this group of patients. Future studies should investigate whether physical activity interventions for patients with schizophrenia benefit from individual analyses of barriers and reward for physical activity in combination with the use of tailored strategies such as personal support and activity planning.

National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236068 (URN)10.2522/ptj.20120443 (DOI)000342734100010 ()24830718 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-11-12 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9997-3221

Search in DiVA

Show all publications