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Rubertsson, ChristineORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7416-6335
Publications (10 of 74) Show all publications
Rubertsson, C. & Skalkidou, A. (2021). Psykologiska aspekter på graviditet och förlossning (3ed.). In: Gunilla Ajne, Marie Blomberg & Ylva Carlsson (Ed.), Obstetrik: (pp. 151-166). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psykologiska aspekter på graviditet och förlossning
2021 (Swedish)In: Obstetrik / [ed] Gunilla Ajne, Marie Blomberg & Ylva Carlsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, 3, p. 151-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021 Edition: 3
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Applied Psychology
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-467224 (URN)9789144142609 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-02-08 Created: 2022-02-08 Last updated: 2022-05-25Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I. & Rubertsson, C. (2021). Testing the birth attitude profile scale in a Swedish sample of women with fear of birth. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 42(2), 132-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing the birth attitude profile scale in a Swedish sample of women with fear of birth
2021 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the "Birth Attitude Profile Scale (BAPS)" in a selected sample of women with fear of birth. Another aim was to develop profiles of women according to their birth attitudes and levels of childbirth fear in relation to background characteristics. Methods: A secondary analysis of data collected in two different samples of women with fear of birth. Data were collected by a questionnaire in gestational week 36 and background data from mid-pregnancy. A principal component analysis and a cluster analysis were performed of the combined sample of 195 women. Results: The principal component analysis revealed four domains of the BAPS: "personal impact, birth as a natural event, freedom of choice and safety concerns". When adding the fear of birth scale, two clusters were identified: one with strong attitudes and lower fear, labeled "self-determiners"; and one with no strong attitudes but high levels of fear, labeled "fearful." Women in the "Fearful" cluster more often reported previous and current mental health problems, which were the main difference between the clusters. Conclusion: The BAPS instrument seems to be useful in identifying birth attitudes in women with fear of birth and could be a basis for discussions and birth planning during pregnancy. Mental health problems were the main difference in cluster membership; therefore, it is important to ask women with fear of childbirth about physical, mental and social aspects of health. In addition, a qualitative approach using techniques such as focus groups or interviews is needed to explore how women come to form their attitudes and beliefs about birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & FrancisInforma UK Limited, 2021
Keywords
Birth attitudes, cluster analysis, fear of childbirth, mental health, pregnancy
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-454201 (URN)10.1080/0167482X.2020.1729118 (DOI)000515041300001 ()32081051 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03660
Available from: 2021-09-28 Created: 2021-09-28 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Karlstrom, A., Rubertsson, C. & Larsson, B. (2020). Birth outcome in a caseload study conducted in a rural area of Sweden: a register based study. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 24, Article ID 100509.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Birth outcome in a caseload study conducted in a rural area of Sweden: a register based study
2020 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 24, article id 100509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Continuity models of midwifery care are rare in Sweden, despite its well-known positive effects. The aim was to describe pregnancy and birth outcome in women participating in a continuity of care project in a rural area of Sweden.

Method: A register-based study of 266 women recruited to the project and a control group of 125 women from the same catchment area. Midwives provided antenatal care and were on-call 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. for birth. Data were collected from the antenatal and birth records. Crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated between women in the project and the control group.

Results: There were more primiparous women and highly educated women recruited to the project, and fewer foreign-born and single women, compared to the control group. Women in the project met more midwives and were less likely to have a pregnancy complication. During intrapartum care, women recruited to the project were less likely to need labour augmentation and less likely to have an instrumental vaginal birth and elective caesarean section. They had fewer second degree perineal tears and were more likely to fully breastfeed at discharge. No differences were found in neonatal outcome. The continuity of a known midwife at birth was quite low.

Conclusion: This study shows that women self-recruited to a continuity of care project in a rural area of Sweden had a higher rate of normal births. There were few differences if having a known midwife or not. Long distances to hospital and lack of staff affected the level of continuity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2020
Keywords
Birth records, Continuity of care, Labour outcome, Caseload midwifery, Midwifery, Register-based study
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-413447 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2020.100509 (DOI)000533147400015 ()32220783 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20190008
Available from: 2020-06-18 Created: 2020-06-18 Last updated: 2020-06-18Bibliographically approved
Cato, K., Sylvén, S. M., Wahlström Eriksson, H. & Rubertsson, C. (2020). Breastfeeding as a balancing act: pregnant Swedish women’s voices on breastfeeding. International Breastfeeding Journal, 15, Article ID 16.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding as a balancing act: pregnant Swedish women’s voices on breastfeeding
2020 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 15, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Breastfeeding provides health benefits to both women and children. The rationale behind an individual woman's decision to breastfeed or not can depend on several factors, either independently or in combination. The aim of the current study was to explore attitudes towards breastfeeding among pregnant women in Sweden who intend to breastfeed.

Methods: Eleven mothers-to-be, one of whom had previous breastfeeding experience, participated in the study. The women were interviewed either by telephone or face-to-face during late pregnancy, with the aim of exploring their attitudes towards breastfeeding. A semi-structured interview-guide was used, and the transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The social ecological model of health is the theory-based framework underpinning this study. The model provides a comprehensive approach to understanding the factors that influence breastfeeding intention.

Results: When interviewed during pregnancy, women described breastfeeding as a balancing act between societal norms and personal desires. The women perceived a societal pressure to breastfeed, however it was accompanied by boundaries and mixed messages. This perceived pressure was balanced by their own knowledge of breastfeeding, in particular their knowledge of other women's experience of breastfeeding. When envisioning their future breastfeeding, the women made uncertain and preliminary plans, and negotiated the benefits and drawbacks of breastfeeding. There was a wish for individual breastfeeding support and information.

Conclusions: Pregnant Swedish women perceive their future breastfeeding as a balancing act between societal norms and personal desires. These findings suggest that while discussing breastfeeding during pregnancy, it could be of interest to collect information from pregnant women on their knowledge of breastfeeding and from where they have gained this knowledge, since stories from family and friends may make them question their own capacity to breastfeed. A thorough review of the woman's experiences and attitudes of breastfeeding is important in order to offer the best evidence-based breastfeeding support.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348655 (URN)10.1186/s13006-020-00257-0 (DOI)000519017900001 ()32138725 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I. & Rubertsson, C. (2020). Childbirth experiences among women with fear of birth randomized to internet-based cognitive therapy or midwife counseling. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 41(3), 205-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childbirth experiences among women with fear of birth randomized to internet-based cognitive therapy or midwife counseling
2020 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although women with fear of birth often report negative birth experiences, few studies have focused on their experiences in the long term. The aim of this study was to compare birth experiences a year after childbirth in two groups of women receiving treatment for experiencing fear of birth during pregnancy.

Methods: As part of the U-CARE: Pregnancy Trial, a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) and standard care among pregnant women with fear of birth. Women were recruited at three Swedish hospitals following a screening procedure that assessed their fear of birth. Data were collected online with the Childbirth Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), one question about the overall birth experience, and questions about personal background, collected before randomization.

Results: A total of 181 women responded to the follow-up questionnaire a year after childbirth. Approximately half of participants reported a less positive birth experience. Preferred mode of birth, actual mode of birth, marital status and psychiatric history were associated with the domains of the CEQ. However, no statistically significant differences emerged between the treatment groups.

Conclusions: Being randomized to receive iCBT or counseling with midwives for fear of birth was not associated with perceptions of the birth experience assessed a year after birth. Most participants reported less-than-positive birth experiences and scored low on the domain of the CEQ reflecting Own capacity. In response, additional research remains necessary to identify the best model of care that might facilitate positive experiences with giving birth among women with fear of birth.

Keywords
Fear of birth, Internet-based cognitive therapy, counseling, midwifery, birth experience
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400591 (URN)10.1080/0167482X.2019.1634047 (DOI)000565881400003 ()31244352 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-12-28 Created: 2019-12-28 Last updated: 2020-10-15Bibliographically approved
Baylis, R., Ekdahl, J., Haines, H. & Rubertsson, C. (2020). Women's experiences of internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (iCBT) for Fear of Birth. Women and Birth, 33(3), E227-E233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women's experiences of internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (iCBT) for Fear of Birth
2020 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 33, no 3, p. E227-E233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fear of Birth is common in pregnant women and associated with negative physical and mental health. There is a clear comorbidity with anxiety and depression. Internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been suggested as a treatment option for Fear of Birth and a randomized controlled trial comparing internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with midwifery led counselling as standard care has been conducted.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe women's experiences of guided internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Fear of Birth and to describe the content of their fear.

Methods: The present study is a qualitative, follow-up interview study following the randomized controlled trial, the U-CARE Pregnancy Trial. In total 19 women allocated to internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Fear of Birth were interviewed by telephone. A semi-structured interview guide was used and the transcripts were analyzed with thematic analysis.

Results: The women's descriptions of Fear of Birth differed, however their fear was most often associated with fear of losing control, fear for the baby's life or health or own life threatening events. The experiences of internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Fear of Birth varied, some women were positive to its flexibility although most women preferred a face-to face meeting. The treatment did not pin-point their fears, it was challenging to maintain motivation and to work with the treatment in solitude.

Conclusions: Women's descriptions of Fear of Birth varied. Most women undergoing internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy would have preferred a face-to-face meeting which they imagined would have soothed their fear. Internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Fear of Birth may be an alternative for some women. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2020
Keywords
Fear of Birth, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, iCBT, Women's experiences
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-411536 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2019.05.006 (DOI)000528831400006 ()31160244 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-06-03 Created: 2020-06-03 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Karlström, A., Rubertsson, C. & Haines, H. (2019). A known midwife can make a difference for women with fear of childbirth- birth outcome and experience of intrapartum care. Sexual and Reproductive healthcare, 21, 33-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A known midwife can make a difference for women with fear of childbirth- birth outcome and experience of intrapartum care
2019 (English)In: Sexual and Reproductive healthcare, Vol. 21, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400592 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2019.06.004 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-12-28 Created: 2019-12-28 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Rubertsson, C., Karlström, A. & Haines, H. (2019). A known midwife can make a difference for women with fear of childbirth-birth outcome and women's experiences of intrapartum care. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 21, 33-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A known midwife can make a difference for women with fear of childbirth-birth outcome and women's experiences of intrapartum care
2019 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 21, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is evidence that continuity of midwifery care is beneficial to women. Women with fear of childbirth in Sweden are offered counselling, but receiving care from a known midwife during labour is unusual, despite its effects in reducing interventions and increasing birth satisfaction. The aim of this study was to describe and compare birth outcome and experience of intrapartum care among women with fear of childbirth who received intrapartum care from a known midwife, versus those who did not.

Methods: An experimental study of 70 women referred to counselling due to fear of birth during pregnancy wherein the counselling midwife, when possible, also assisted during labour and birth.

Results: Having a known midwife during labour and birth had a positive impact on fearful women’s birth experience and their perception of pain, but there was no difference in onset of labour or mode of birth. Women who received care from a known midwife experienced better care with regards to information, participation in decision making and perception of control.

Conclusion: This study indicates that having access to a known midwife might have an impact on women’s birth experience. This study was limited by its small sample size and further research would need to randomise fearful women to counselling or continuity of care to determine the contribution of each to reducing fear.

 

Keywords
Fear of childbirth, Intrapartum care, Continuity, Counseling, Birth experience
National Category
Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395432 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2019.06.004 (DOI)000485335500007 ()31395231 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Cato, K., Sylvén, S. M., Georgakis, M. K., Kollia, N., Rubertsson, C. & Skalkidou, A. (2019). Antenatal depressive symptoms and early initiation of breastfeeding in association with exclusive breastfeeding six weeks postpartum: a longitudinal population-based study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 19, Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antenatal depressive symptoms and early initiation of breastfeeding in association with exclusive breastfeeding six weeks postpartum: a longitudinal population-based study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Depressive symptoms negatively impact on breastfeeding duration, whereas early breastfeeding initiation after birth enhances the chances for a longer breastfeeding period. Our aim was to investigate the interplay between depressive symptoms during pregnancy and late initiation of the first breastfeeding session and their effect on exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks postpartum.

Methods

In a longitudinal study design, web-questionnaires including demographic data, breastfeeding information and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were completed by 1217 women at pregnancy weeks 17–20, 32 and/or at six weeks postpartum. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the effect of depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the timing of the first breastfeeding session on exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks postpartum.

Results

Exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks postpartum was reported by 77% of the women. Depressive symptoms during pregnancy (EPDS> 13); (OR:1.93 [1.28–2.91]) and not accomplishing the first breastfeeding session within two hours after birth (OR: 2.61 [1.80–3.78]), were both associated with not exclusively breastfeeding at six weeks postpartum after adjusting for identified confounders. Τhe combined exposure to depressive symptoms in pregnancy and late breastfeeding initiation was associated with an almost 4-fold increased odds of not exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks postpartum.

Conclusions

Women reporting depressive symptoms during pregnancy seem to be more vulnerable to the consequences of a postponed first breastfeeding session on exclusive breastfeeding duration. Consequently, women experiencing depressive symptoms may benefit from targeted breastfeeding support during the first hours after birth.

Keywords
Antenatal depression, Breastfeeding initiation, Exclusive breastfeeding, Breastfeeding discontinuation
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377343 (URN)10.1186/s12884-019-2195-9 (DOI)000457123700001 ()30696409 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Fahlgren, M., Rubertsson, C. & Williams, A. (2019). "Varför vi är där vi är idag": Samtal med barnmorskor om abortskildringar i litteraturen. Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, 40(3/4), 55-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Varför vi är där vi är idag": Samtal med barnmorskor om abortskildringar i litteraturen
2019 (Swedish)In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 40, no 3/4, p. 55-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores if conversations about literary texts that thematize abortion can provide new knowledge about the clinical everyday practice of midwives. The empirical material consists of conversations with seven clinical midwives after shared reading of a sample of fictional and biographical Swedish texts from the 1930s, 1950s, 1990s and 2010s. Drawing on theories of power relations, gendered knowledge and narrative medicine, the article investigates the relationship between the texts and the midwives’ professional experiences. The study demonstrates that the participants agreed on the positive effects of reading and discussing literary texts related to their professional work. The study cannot establish that it has provided new knowledge about the midwives’ clinical practice; it concludes, however, that the shared reading and conversations generated an exchange about experiences of abortion care that subsequently could deepen knowledge about treatment and practice within the profession. The study demonstrates that the reading experience generated discussions about the clinical practice that otherwise would never have taken place, for the participants asserted that the conversations had given time for reflection about medical, social and emotional issues that did not occur in clinic. The texts brought specific professional experiences to the fore and offered new perspectives on norms, practices and the professional role. One distinct impression conveyed by the participants was that shame is still a salient feeling among the patients, signaling that abortion is still a sensitive subject. The article concludes that similar elements of reading and discussing literary texts could prove an important part of (continuous) training for professional midwives.  

Keywords
literature, abortion care, midwives, patienthood, gender, narrative medicina, litteratur, abortvård, barnmorskor, patentsöka, genus, medicinsk humaniora
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Literature; Health Care Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-403277 (URN)
Projects
Mamma hursomhelst. Litterära, vårdrelaterade och mediala berättelser (Vetenskapsrådet, dnr 2016-01602
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-01602
Available from: 2020-01-27 Created: 2020-01-27 Last updated: 2021-10-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7416-6335

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