uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Thernström Blomqvist, YlvaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5955-1278
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Biskop, E., Paulsdotter, T., Hellström-Westas, L., Ågren, J. & Thernström Blomqvist, Y. (2019). Parental participation during therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxicischemic encephalopathy. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 20, 77-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental participation during therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxicischemic encephalopathy
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 77-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To examine parental participation in the care of newborn infants receiving therapeutic hypothermia, and to explore the possible impact of in-born vs out-born status, and location of hospital accommodation. Study design: Retrospective, quantitative and descriptive design. Main outcome measures: Infants medical charts were reviewed for defined aspects of parental participation (infant holding, tube feeding, and diaper change), and related to their in-born vs out-born status, and whether the parents were accommodated in the NICU or elsewhere. All infants have been cared for at the University Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, serving as a regional referral center for hypothermia treatment. This study is a part of a population-based regional cohort of asphyxiated newborn infants (n = 112) that received therapeutic hypothermia in 2007-2015. Results: Parents engaged in holding (60/112, 54%) or tube feeding (59/112, 53%) their infant. Parents of inborn infants (24/112, 21%) were more likely to check the placement of the feeding tube (11/24, 46% vs 15/88, 17%; p < 0.01) and change diapers (9/24, 38% vs 14/88, 16%; p < 0.05) than parents of out-born infants (88/112, 79%). A similar pattern of more extensive involvement was observed for both mothers and fathers who stayed at the neonatal intensive care compared to those accommodated elsewhere (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Active parental participation is feasible at the NICU even during therapeutic hypothermia. Timely postnatal transfer of parents of out-born/transported infants, and the provision of on-site accommodation may influence the quality of parental involvement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2019
Keywords
Neonatal intensive care, Chart review, Therapeutic hypothermia, Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, Parental participation, Parental involvement
National Category
Pediatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387928 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2019.03.004 (DOI)000470192400015 ()31084824 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Norman, M., Källén, K., Wahlström, E., Håkansson, S., Skiöld, B., Navér, L., . . . Wallin-Gyökeres, A. (2019). The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register - contents, completeness and validity. Acta Paediatrica, 108(8), 1411-1418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register - contents, completeness and validity
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers.

Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers' agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years.

Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24-34, completeness of SNQ was 98-99%. Below and above these gestational ages, completeness was lower. Infants missing in SNQ were term or near-term in 99% of the cases, and their diagnoses indicated conditions managed in maternity units, or re-admissions for acute infections, managed in paediatric units. For most diagnoses, the agreement between SNQ and population registers was high, but some (bronchopulmonary dysplasia and grade of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy) were often missing in the population registers.

Conclusion: SNQ completeness and agreement against other registers, especially for preterm infants, is excellent. SNQ is a valid tool for benchmarking, quality improvement and research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Completeness, Newborn infant, Quality of neonatal care, Register, Validation
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390497 (URN)10.1111/apa.14823 (DOI)000474935600009 ()31006126 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County Council
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Noren, J., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rubertsson, C. & Blomqvist, Y. T. (2018). Becoming a mother: Mothers' experience of Kangaroo Mother Care. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 16, 181-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming a mother: Mothers' experience of Kangaroo Mother Care
2018 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 181-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe mothers' experiences of providing their preterm infants with Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC).

Study design: A qualitative descriptive design.

Setting: Two level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Sweden.

Participants: Thirteen mothers of preterm infants.

Methods: The mothers were interviewed when their infant had reached a corrected age of 4 months +/- 2 weeks. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The mothers described the skin-to-skin contact with, and closeness to, the preterm infant as something they valued, and involuntary physical separation as something they had to accept and adapt to. Providing the infant with breast milk by expressing and tube feeding was experienced as time-consuming and as impinging on the skin-to-skin contact.

Conclusion: Mothers want to stay close to their preterm infant. The NICU environment and staff can facilitate KMC by providing a private space for parents and infants, and enable mothers to breastfeed and express breast milk by giving them support based on science and proven experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363075 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2018.04.005 (DOI)000440877700028 ()29804764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Angelhoff, C., Blomqvist, Y. T., Helmer, C. S., Olsson, E., Shorey, S., Frostell, A. & Mörelius, E. (2018). Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents' sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 8(7), Article ID e021606.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents' sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents' sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

Methods and analysis: A randomised intervention study with two arms-intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents' gender.

Ethics and dissemination: The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89-31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
Keywords
attachment, bonding, kangaroo mother care, neonata care, sleep, Stress
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368121 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-021606 (DOI)000446181900144 ()30068615 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Larsson, C., Karlsson, V. & Blomqvist, Y. T. (2018). Nurse Decision Making and Attitudes About Circuit Disconnection During Ventilator Therapy at a Swedish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Advances in Neonatal Care, 18(6), E13-E20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse Decision Making and Attitudes About Circuit Disconnection During Ventilator Therapy at a Swedish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
2018 (English)In: Advances in Neonatal Care, ISSN 1536-0903, E-ISSN 1536-0911, Vol. 18, no 6, p. E13-E20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There are many challenges to providing care to infants in need of ventilator therapy. Yet, few studies describe the practical handling of the ventilator circuit during nursing care.

Purpose: To describe neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses' decision making regarding whether or not to disconnect the ventilator circuit when changing the infant's position and to investigate the grounds for their decisions.

Methods: A descriptive questionnaire study with both quantitative and qualitative elements was conducted. In 2015, a convenience sample of nurses working in an NICU completed a questionnaire including both closed-ended and open-ended, free-text questions. Answers to the closed-ended questions were analyzed with descriptive statistics, whereas answers to the free-text questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: Nurses' decisions on whether to disconnect or keep the ventilator circuit closed were based on the infant's needs for ventilator support. The nurses gave several reasons and motivations both for why they disconnected the circuit and for why they did not. The handling of the circuit and the reasons and motivations given were inconsistent among the nurses.

Implications for Practice: This study highlights the need for continuous, repetitive education and training for NICU nurses, as well as demonstrating the importance of clear and distinct guidelines and working methods regarding the care of infants on ventilator support.

Implications for Research: Future research should continue to find ways of working and handling an infant on ventilator support that are least harmful to the infant.

Keywords
circuit disconnection, infants, neonatal intensive care unit, nursing, ventilator therapy
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377718 (URN)10.1097/ANC.0000000000000564 (DOI)000457618300002 ()30299284 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-08 Created: 2019-03-08 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Larsson, C., Wågstrom, U., Normann, E. & Thernström Blomqvist, Y. (2017). Parents experiences of discharge readiness from a Swedish neonatal intensive care unit. Nursing Open, 4(2), 90-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents experiences of discharge readiness from a Swedish neonatal intensive care unit
2017 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how parents experienced the support at, and preparation for discharge from, the NICU and how they experienced the first time at home. Design: A qualitative design with quantitative elements was applied. Methods: A questionnaire study. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with quantitative elements. Results: The majority of included parents felt adequately prepared for going home and sufficiently supported during the first period home. Negative experiences were related to lack of time for preparation, lack of support and information, especially about the infant's food intake, breastfeeding, and tube feeding, and lack of follow-up counselling post discharge. This study supports that parents who are closely involved in their infant's care at the NICU, and who stay with the infant at the NICU around the clock, are well prepared for the transition to home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
discharge, neonatal intensive care unit, parents' experience, qualitative content analysis, questionnaire study, transition to home
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320641 (URN)10.1002/nop2.71 (DOI)000395651500005 ()28286665 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, Y. T., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rubertsson, C. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2017). Parents need support to find ways to optimise their own sleep without seeing their preterm infant's sleeping patterns as a problem. Acta Paediatrica, 106(2), 223-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents need support to find ways to optimise their own sleep without seeing their preterm infant's sleeping patterns as a problem
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study described how parents perceived their own sleep, and their infants', during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and after discharge. It also explored the infants' sleeping location at home.

METHODS: The study was conducted in the NICUs of two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 86 infants - 86 mothers and 84 fathers - answered questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay, at discharge and at the infants' corrected ages of two, six and 12 months. The parents' own sleep was explored with the Insomnia Severity Index.

RESULTS: Mothers reported more severe insomnia than fathers during their infants' hospitalisation, and these higher insomnia severity scores were associated with more severe infant sleep problems at discharge (p = 0.027) and at two months (p = 0.006) and 12 months (p = 0.002) of corrected age. During the study period, 4%-10% of the parents reported severe or very severe infant sleeping problems. The bed-sharing rate was 75% after discharge and about 60% at the corrected age of 12 months.

CONCLUSION: Maternal insomnia during an infant's hospital stay was associated with later perceptions of sleep problems in their children. Parents need support to find solutions for optimal sleep without seeing their child's sleeping patterns as a problem.

Keywords
Bed-sharing, Insomnia, Neonatal intensive care unit, Preterm infants, Sleep problems
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311797 (URN)10.1111/apa.13660 (DOI)000397337100008 ()27925691 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Oras, P., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Gradin, M., Rubertsson, C., Hellström-Westas, L. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2016). Skin-to-skin contact is associated with earlier breastfeeding attainment in preterm infants. Acta Paediatrica, 105(7), 783-789
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skin-to-skin contact is associated with earlier breastfeeding attainment in preterm infants
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 7, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

This study investigated the effects of skin-to-skin contact on breastfeeding attainment, duration and infant growth in preterm infants, as this has not been sufficiently explored.

METHODS:

A prospective longitudinal study on Kangaroo mother care was carried out, comprising 104 infants with a gestational age of 28+0 to 33+6 and followed up to one year of corrected age. Parents and staff recorded the duration of skin-to skin contact during the stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Medical data were collected through patient records and follow-up questionnaires were filled in by parents.

RESULTS:

The 53 infants who attained full breastfeeding in the NICU did so at a median (range) of 35+0 (32+1 to 37+5) weeks of postmenstrual age and skin-to-skin contact was the only factor that influenced earlier attainment in the regression analysis (R(2) 0.215 p<0.001). The daily duration of skin-to-skin contact during the stay in the NICU did not affect the duration of breastfeeding or infant growth after discharge. Furthermore, infant growth was not affected by the feeding strategy of exclusive, partial breastfeeding or no breastfeeding.

CONCLUSION:

A longer daily duration of skin-to-skin contact in the NICU was associated with earlier attainment of exclusive breastfeeding.

Keywords
Breastfeeding duration; family-centred care; human milk; infant growth; Kangaroo mother care
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-289173 (URN)10.1111/apa.13431 (DOI)000378565100018 ()27100380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Oras, P., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Gradin, M., Rubertsson, C., Hellström-Westas, L. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2015). Breastfeeding Patterns in Preterm Infants Born at 28-33 Gestational Weeks. Journal of Human Lactation, 31(3), 377-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding Patterns in Preterm Infants Born at 28-33 Gestational Weeks
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Studies of breastfeeding patterns during preterm infants' first year of life are scarce but are important for providing breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants with optimal support.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to describe breastfeeding patterns in preterm infants up to 1 year of corrected age.

METHODS:

As part of a larger study on kangaroo mother care in Sweden, a 24-hour breastfeeding diary was sent home after discharge from hospital, and at 2, 6, and 12 months of the infant's corrected age. Eighty-three mothers responded to the follow-up questionnaires, and the number of respondents to the breastfeeding diary was 48 at discharge, 43 at 2 months, 22 at 6 months, and 8 at 12 months. Infants were born at a median (range) gestational age of 32 (28-33) weeks. Breastfeeding patterns were analyzed according to durations, frequencies per 24 hours, and intervals between sessions.

RESULTS:

In exclusively breastfed infants, the median (range) breastfeeding session frequency was 14 (8-26) times per 24 hours including 4 (1-9) times per night after discharge (n = 24) and 10 (6-25) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-5) times per night at 2 months (n = 23). In partially breastfed infants, the median (range) frequency was 5 (1-14) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-4) times per night at 6 months (n = 20) and 5.5 (1-12) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-3) times per night at 12 months (n = 8).

CONCLUSION:

Mothers reported large variations in breastfeeding patterns, with higher median breastfeeding session frequencies than previously described in term infants in affluent settings.

National Category
Clinical Medicine Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-254708 (URN)10.1177/0890334415586406 (DOI)000358070300010 ()25956792 (PubMedID)
Note

This study was supported by grants from the Regional Research Council in the Uppsala-Orebro region, Uppsala County Council, and Uppsala University Funds.

Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Mode, R. I., Mard, E., Nyqvist, K. H. & Blomqvist, Y. T. (2014). Fathers' perception of information received during their infants' stay at a neonatal intensive care unit. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 5(3), 131-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fathers' perception of information received during their infants' stay at a neonatal intensive care unit
2014 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore fathers' perception of information received during their infants' care at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: An inductive, qualitative and descriptive study. Eight fathers in two units were interviewed. The infants' gestational age at birth ranged between 23 and 36 weeks. Data were collected through semi-structured, individual interviews and were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Three categories were identified: perception of information, perception of the source of information, and circumstances influencing the perception of information. Information had an important impact; comprehensible and adequate information increased the fathers' knowledge, which generated a sense of control. Early information about the infant's care was particularly important and positively affected father and infant bonding. Conclusion and practical implications: Ensuring a high quality of information is an important task for NICU staff. Fathers' perception of the quality of information depended on the contents of the information and how it was conveyed. Comprehensible information at the onset of the infant's hospital stay increased the fathers' sense of security, and made them feel in control. It is important that the staff strive to identify what information the father requires, and prevent situations when fathers feel uncertainty about what the staff expect from them.

Keywords
Father, Information, Infant preterm, Neonatal intensive care unit, Staff
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236072 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2014.05.001 (DOI)000342889200008 ()25200974 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-11-12 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5955-1278

Search in DiVA

Show all publications