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Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
Tlostanova, M., Thapar-Björkert, S. & Knobblock, I. (2019). Do We Need Decolonial Feminism in Sweden?. NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do We Need Decolonial Feminism in Sweden?
2019 (English)In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Keywords
Decolonial, Sweden, Race, feminism, postcolonialism
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391066 (URN)10.1080/08038740.2019.1641552 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-18 Created: 2019-08-18 Last updated: 2019-08-19
Thapar-Björkert, S., Molina, I. & Rana Villacura, K. (2019). From Welfare to Warfare: Exploring the Militarisation of the Swedish Suburb. In: Suvi Keskinen, Unnur Dís Skaptadóttir, Mari Toivanen (Ed.), Undoing Homogeneity in the Nordic Region: Migration, Difference and the Politics of Solidarity. Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Welfare to Warfare: Exploring the Militarisation of the Swedish Suburb
2019 (English)In: Undoing Homogeneity in the Nordic Region: Migration, Difference and the Politics of Solidarity / [ed] Suvi Keskinen, Unnur Dís Skaptadóttir, Mari Toivanen, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391070 (URN)9781138564275 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-18 Created: 2019-08-18 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Ahlberg, B. M., Hamed, S., Thapar-Björkert, S. & Bradby, H. (2019). Invisibility of Racism in the Global Neoliberal Era: Implications for Researching Racism in Healthcare. Frontiers in Sociology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisibility of Racism in the Global Neoliberal Era: Implications for Researching Racism in Healthcare
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Sociology, ISSN 2297-7775Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the difficulties of researching racism in healthcare contexts as part of the wider issue of neoliberal reforms in welfare states in the age of global migration. In trying to understand the contradiction of a phenomenon that is historical and strongly felt by individuals and yet widely denied by both institutions and individuals, we consider the current political and socioeconomic context of healthcare provision. Despite decades of legislation against racism, its presence persists in healthcare settings, but data on these experiences is rarely gathered in Europe. National systems of healthcare provision have been subject to neoliberal reforms, where among others, cheaper forms of labor are sought to reduce the cost of producing healthcare, while the availability of services is rationed to contain demand. The restriction both on provision of and access to welfare, including healthcare, is unpopular among national populations. However, the explanations for restricted access to healthcare are assumed to be located outside the national context with immigrants being blamed. Even as migrants are used as a source of cheap labor in healthcare and other welfare sectors, the arrival of immigrants has been held responsible for restricted access to healthcare and welfare in general. One implication of (im)migration being blamed for healthcare restrictions, while racism is held to be a problem of the past, is the silencing of experiences of racism, which has dire consequences for ethnic minority populations. The implications of racism as a form of inequality within healthcare and the circumstances of researching racism in healthcare and its implication for the sociology of health in Sweden are described.

Keywords
racism, neoliberalism, globalization, migration, healthcare, sociology, inequalities, collaborative research
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390895 (URN)10.3389/fsoc.2019.00061 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15
Farahani, F. & Thapar-Björkert, S. (2019). Postcolonial Masculinities: Diverse, Shifting and in Flux. In: Lucas Gottzén, Ulf Mellström, Ulf and Tamara Shefer (Ed.), Routledge International Handbook of Masculinity Studies: . Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postcolonial Masculinities: Diverse, Shifting and in Flux
2019 (English)In: Routledge International Handbook of Masculinity Studies / [ed] Lucas Gottzén, Ulf Mellström, Ulf and Tamara Shefer, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Moving beyond the seminal contributions of Beauvoir and Fanon on the discursive construction of Otherness, our chapter critically engages with the race-blindness of (western) feminist theories, the gender blindness and heteronormativity of (male) postcolonial theory and the ethnocentrism, race blindness and lack of historical specificity of Western (and white) masculinity studies. We draw on a postcolonial critical masculinities framework to examine the migratory and diasporic experiences of racialised men as gendered subjects in diverse contexts. We highlight how these masculinities are (re)articulated, contested and negotiated in and through specific historical moments, spatial and socio-political contexts, local/transnational discourses and in relation to other dominant/hegemonic (White) masculinities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Masculinity, Fanon, Race, Postcolonial, Beauvoir
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390611 (URN)9781138056695 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-19
Bradby, H., Thapar-Björkert, S., Hamed, S. & Ahlberg, B. M. (2019). Undoing the unspeakable: researching racism in Swedish healthcare using a participatory process to build dialogue. Health Research Policy and Systems, 17, Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undoing the unspeakable: researching racism in Swedish healthcare using a participatory process to build dialogue
2019 (English)In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 17, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Racism is difficult to discuss in the context of Swedish healthcare for various cultural and administrative reasons. Herein, we interpret the fragmentary nature of the evidence of racialising processes and the difficulty of reporting racist discrimination in terms of structural violence.

Methods:

In response to the unspeakable nature of racism in Swedish healthcare, we propose a phased participatory process to build a common vocabulary and grammar through a consultative framework involving healthcare providers and service users as well as policy-makers. These stakeholders will be involved in an educational intervention to facilitate discussion around and avoidance of racism in service provision.

Discussion:

Both the participatory process and outcomes of the process, e.g. educational interventions, will contribute to the social and political conversation about racism in healthcare settings. Creating new ways of discussing sensitive topics allows ameliorative actions to be taken, benefitting healthcare providers and users. The urgency of the project is underlined.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
racism, healthcare, Sweden, participatory methods
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383016 (URN)10.1186/s12961-019-0443-0 (DOI)000465467100001 ()31014361 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04078
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-14Bibliographically approved
Thapar-Björkert, S. & Tlostanova, M. (2018). Identifying to dis-identify: occidentalist feminism, the Delhi gang rape case and its internal others. Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, 25(7), 1025-1040
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying to dis-identify: occidentalist feminism, the Delhi gang rape case and its internal others
2018 (English)In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1025-1040Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Euro-American feminism’s embeddedness in a neo-liberal geo-political framework has created new though contested spaces for knowledge production among scholars, practitioners and policy-makers. In particular, a theoretical tool that has lost its transformatory potential is disidentification, specifically as a signifier for forging collective activism within Europe. In the age of global mobility and border-crossings, Western feminist disidentification is increasingly framed through a pre-conceived notion of the ‘other’ as dis-empowered, exotic and violent. These faulty identifications rather than integrating multi-ethnic intersectional identities deepen the cleavages, especially within the academy. This article draws on two case studies that emerged following the Delhi gang rape case (2012) in New Delhi, India. These studies highlight how debates within the western academy are largely framed from the standpoint of the empowered European feminist self. Thus disidentification, rather than being a process for unpacking hegemonic discourses, becomes, instead, yet another way of packaging new hierarchies of knowledge.

Keywords
Disidentification, Occidentalism, Delhi Gang Rape Case, Violence, Munoz
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345107 (URN)10.1080/0966369X.2018.1435511 (DOI)000451505800007 ()
Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2019-03-26
Thapar-Björkert, S. & Farahani, F. (2018). Rasifiering av kunskapsproduktion: En epistemologisk resa genom processer av inkludering och exkludering i olika akademiska forum.. Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, 38(4), 31-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rasifiering av kunskapsproduktion: En epistemologisk resa genom processer av inkludering och exkludering i olika akademiska forum.
2018 (Swedish)In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 31-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Racialisation, Whiteness, Knowledge production, Swedish Academy
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345147 (URN)
Note

Racialising Knowledge Production. An epistemological journey into processes of exclusion and inclusion within the academy

Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2019-03-22
Sanghera, G. S. & Thapar-Björkert, S. (2017). Transnationalism, social capital and gender - young Pakistani Muslim women in Bradford, UK. Migration Letters, 14(1), 88-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transnationalism, social capital and gender - young Pakistani Muslim women in Bradford, UK
2017 (English)In: Migration Letters, ISSN 1741-8984, E-ISSN 1741-8992, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers the relationship between transnationalism and social capital amongst young Pakistani Muslim women in Bradford, West Yorkshire. The central aim of the article is to explore how second generation Pakistani Muslim women accrue faith based social capital to negotiate and resist transnational gendered expectations, norms and practices. In particular, they use faith based social capital that is transnationally informed: to challenge the patriarchal expectations and norms of their families; to gain access to higher/further education and thereby improve their life opportunities; and to resist growing anti-Muslim sentiment. This paper draws on qualitative research (in-depth interviews) conducted in Bradford.

Keywords
Bradford, gender, Muslim, social capital, transnationalism
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343157 (URN)000415843000008 ()
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Thapar-Bjorkert, S., Samelius, L. & Sanghera, G. S. (2016). exploring symbolic violence in the everyday: misrecognition, condescension, consent and complicity. Feminist review (Print) (112), 144-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>exploring symbolic violence in the everyday: misrecognition, condescension, consent and complicity
2016 (English)In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 112, p. 144-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we draw on Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of 'misrecognition', 'condescension' and 'consent and complicity' to demonstrate how domination and violence are reproduced in everyday interactions, social practices, institutional processes and dispositions. Importantly, this constitutes symbolic violence, which removes the victim's agency and voice. Indeed, we argue that as symbolic violence is impervious, insidious and invisible, it also simultaneously legitimises and sustains other forms of violence as well. Understanding symbolic violence together with traditional discourses of violence is important because it provides a richer insight into the 'workings' of violence, and provides new ways of conceptualising violence across a number of social fields and new strategies for intervention. Symbolic violence is a valuable tool for understanding contentious debates on the disclosure of violence, women leaving or staying in abusive relationships or returning to their abusers. While we focus only on violence against women, we recognise that the gendered nature of violence produces its own sets of vulnerabilities against men and marginalised groups, such as LGBT. The paper draws on empirical research conducted in Sweden in 2003. Sweden is an interesting case study because despite its progressive gender equality policies, there has been no marked decrease in violence towards women by men.

Keywords
symbolic violence, consent, complicity, misrecognition, condescension, Bourdieu
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281842 (URN)10.1057/fr.2015.53 (DOI)000370450100022 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-04-06 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Maiorano, D., Thapar-Björkert, S. & Blomkvist, H. (2016). The paradoxes of empowerment: gendering NREGA in the rural landscape of India. Development in Practice, 26(1), 127-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The paradoxes of empowerment: gendering NREGA in the rural landscape of India
2016 (English)In: Development in Practice, ISSN 0961-4524, E-ISSN 1364-9213, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The growing importance of public works programmes (PWPs) as a social protection tool has attracted significant scholarly attention. However, despite the fact that the empowerment of marginalised communities is one of the key objectives of most PWPs, scant attention has been dedicated to this crucial issue. We contextualise these concerns in relation to India's Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA). In particular, we propose two areas which are relatively unexplored. First, the methodologies currently used to research NREGA and PWP, more generally, need to be broadened. Second, the processes that lead to empowerment need to be researched empirically.

Keywords
Aid - Development policies, Monitoring and evaluation, Labour and livelihoods - Poverty reduction, Gender and diversity, Methods, South Asia
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274267 (URN)10.1080/09614524.2016.1119805 (DOI)000366600300012 ()
Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-01-20 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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