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Engman, Jonas
Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Bas-Hoogendam, J. M., van Steenbergen, H., Pannekoek, J. N., Fouche, J.-P., Lochner, C., Hattingh, C. J., . . . van der Wee, N. J. J. (2017). Sample Size Matters: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Multi-Center Mega-Analysis of Gray Matter Volume in Social Anxiety Disorder. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 18-20, 2017, San Diego, CA. Biological Psychiatry, 81(10), S7-S8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample Size Matters: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Multi-Center Mega-Analysis of Gray Matter Volume in Social Anxiety Disorder
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2017 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, S7-S8 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Keyword
Social Anxiety Disorder, Voxel Based Morphometry
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331803 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.02.027 (DOI)000400348700017 ()
Conference
72nd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 18-20, 2017, San Diego, CA
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2017-10-19Bibliographically approved
Engman, J., Linnman, C., Van Dijk, K. R. A. & Milad, M. R. (2016). Amygdala subnuclei resting-state functional connectivity sex and estrogen differences. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 63, 34-42.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amygdala subnuclei resting-state functional connectivity sex and estrogen differences
2016 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 63, 34-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The amygdala is a hub in emotional processing, including that of negative affect. Healthy men and women have distinct differences in amygdala responses, potentially setting the stage for the observed sex differences in the prevalence of fear, anxiety, and pain disorders. Here, we examined how amygdala subnuclei resting-state functional connectivity is affected by sex, as well as explored how the functional connectivity is related to estrogen levels. Resting-state functional connectivity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with seeds placed in the left and right laterobasal (LB) and centro-medial (CM) amygdala. Sex differences were studied in 48 healthy men and 48 healthy women, matched for age, while the association with estrogen was analyzed in a subsample of 24 women, for whom hormone levels had been assessed. For the hormone analyses, the subsample was further divided into a lower and higher estrogen levels group based on a median split. We found distinct sex differences in the LB and CM amygdala resting-state functional connectivity, as well as preliminary evidence for an association between estrogen levels and connectivity patterns. These results are potentially valuable in explaining why women are more afflicted by conditions of negative affect than are men, and could imply a mechanistic role for estrogen in modulating emotion.

Keyword
Intrinsic connectivity networks, Spontaneous fluctuations, Sex differences, Hormones, Estradiol, Negative affect
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Neurology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274923 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.09.012 (DOI)000367422400005 ()26406106 (PubMedID)
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), 1S10RR023043NIH (National Institute of Health), 1S10RR023401
Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Björkstrand, J., Ågren, T., Motilla Hoppe, J., Hjorth, O., Frick, A., Åhs, F., . . . Furmark, T. (2016). Approach behavior to fear conditioned cues is modulated by monetary reward and correlated to serotonin and dopamine transporter binding in the amygdala. In: : . Paper presented at The European Meeting on Human Fear Conditioning, Utrecht, The Netherlands. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Approach behavior to fear conditioned cues is modulated by monetary reward and correlated to serotonin and dopamine transporter binding in the amygdala
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-291323 (URN)
Conference
The European Meeting on Human Fear Conditioning, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-05-01 Last updated: 2016-05-01
Gingnell, M., Bannbers, E., Engman, J., Frick, A., Moby, L., Wikström, J. & Sundström-Poromaa, I. (2016). The effect of combined hormonal contraceptives use on brain reactivity during response inhibition. European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, 21(2), 150-157.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of combined hormonal contraceptives use on brain reactivity during response inhibition
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2016 (English)In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 21, no 2, 150-157 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives Cognitive control, which can be described as the ability to moderate impulses, has not previously been investigated in users of combined hormonal contraception (CHC). Given the suggested modulatory role of ovarian steroids in prefrontal dopaminergic function, which in turn taps into cognitive control, this randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled oral contraceptive trial set out to investigate the brain activity pattern during response inhibition in CHC users. Methods Thirty-four women were randomised to one treatment cycle with a levonorgestrel-containing CHC or placebo. The women performed a Go/NoGo task to measure brain activity during response inhibition by use of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to and during the CHC/placebo treatment cycle. Results No differences between CHC and placebo users in number of correct inhibitions were found during treatment, but only women on CHC significantly improved their performance between the baseline and treatment assessments. During the treatment cycle CHC users displayed decreased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus in comparison with placebo users. No other significant activations were evident between treatment groups or within groups. Conclusion Overall, CHC use had marginal effects on brain activity during response inhibition. If anything, the findings of the study may suggest reduced effort or increased efficiency in maintaining orbitofrontal cortex inhibitory cognitive control when using a combined oral contraceptive.

Keyword
Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Go/NoGo; Oestrogen; Oral contraceptives; Progestagen; Randomised clinical trial; Response inhibition
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265145 (URN)10.3109/13625187.2015.1077381 (DOI)000375025700006 ()26291330 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Engman, J., Sundström-Poromaa, I., Fredrikson, M. & Gingnell, M. (2015). Amygdala Resting State Functional Connectivity is Affected by Oral Contraceptives and Menstrual Cycle Phase. Paper presented at Oral presentation at the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland. October 2015.. Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, 28(1S), S70-S70.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amygdala Resting State Functional Connectivity is Affected by Oral Contraceptives and Menstrual Cycle Phase
2015 (English)In: Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 0968-5243, E-ISSN 1352-8661, Vol. 28, no 1S, S70-S70 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284491 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation at the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland. October 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Björkstrand, J., Ågren, T., Frick, A., Engman, J., Larsson, E.-M., Furmark, T. & Fredrikson, M. (2015). Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0129393.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, e0129393- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear. We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-259785 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0129393 (DOI)000358153000028 ()26132145 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2010-3284, 421-2009-2343The Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2014-0151
Note

Boethius stiftelse  PSYK2010/143, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, Heumanska stiftelsen

Available from: 2015-08-11 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Gingnell, M., Bannbers, E., Moes, H., Engman, J., Sylvén, S., Skalkidou, A., . . . Sundström-Poromaa, I. (2015). Emotion Reactivity Is Increased 4-6 Weeks Postpartum in Healthy Women: A Longitudinal fMRI Study. PLoS ONE, 10(6), Article ID e0128964.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion Reactivity Is Increased 4-6 Weeks Postpartum in Healthy Women: A Longitudinal fMRI Study
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, e0128964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marked endocrine alterations occur after delivery. Most women cope well with these changes, but the postpartum period is associated with an increased risk of depressive episodes. Previous studies of emotion processing have focused on maternal-infant bonding or postpartum depression (PPD), and longitudinal studies of the neural correlates of emotion processing throughout the postpartum period in healthy women are lacking. In this study, 13 women, without signs of post partum depression, underwent fMRI with an emotional face matching task and completed the MADRS-S, STAI-S, and EPDS within 48 h (early postpartum) and 4-6 weeks after delivery (late postpartum). Also, data from a previous study including 15 naturally cycling controls assessed in the luteal and follicular phase of the menstrual cycle was used. Women had lower reactivity in insula, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in the early as compared to the late postpartum assessment. Insular reactivity was positively correlated with anxiety in the early postpartum period and with depressive symptoms late postpartum. Reactivity in insula and IFG were greater in postpartum women than in non-pregnant control subjects. Brain reactivity was not correlated with serum estradiol or progesterone levels. Increased reactivity in the insula, IFG, and MFG may reflect normal postpartum adaptation, but correlation with self-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety in these otherwise healthy postpartum women, may also suggest that these changes place susceptible women at increased risk of PPD. These findings contribute to our understanding of the neurobiological aspects of the postpartum period, which might shed light on the mechanisms underlying affective puerperal disorders, such as PPD.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-258776 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0128964 (DOI)000355979500112 ()26061879 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2008-54X-200642-01-3
Available from: 2015-07-20 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Engman, J. (2015). Estrogen Effects on Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity. In: : . Paper presented at Poster presented at the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP) Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada. May 2015.. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estrogen Effects on Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284494 (URN)
Conference
Poster presented at the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP) Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada. May 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2016-04-18
Engman, J., Linnman, C., Van Dijk, K. R. A. & Milad, M. R. (2015). Estrogen Effects on Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity. Paper presented at 70th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry on Stress, Emotion, Neurodevelopment and Psychopathology, MAY 14-16, 2015, Toronto, CANADA. Biological Psychiatry, 77(9), Article ID 644.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estrogen Effects on Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity
2015 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 77, no 9, 644Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Keyword
estrogen, amygdala, resting-state, functional connectivity
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-255009 (URN)000352207501238 ()
Conference
70th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry on Stress, Emotion, Neurodevelopment and Psychopathology, MAY 14-16, 2015, Toronto, CANADA
Available from: 2015-06-15 Created: 2015-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Wells, M., Engman, J. & Sarkadi, A. (2015). Gender equality in Swedish child health centers: An analysis of their physical environments and parental behaviors. Semiotica (204), 1-20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender equality in Swedish child health centers: An analysis of their physical environments and parental behaviors
2015 (English)In: Semiotica, ISSN 0037-1998, E-ISSN 1613-3692, no 204, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

The aim of this study is to investigate the level of gender equality within the Swedish child health centers’ (CHCs) waiting rooms.

Methods

A total of 31 CHCs waiting rooms were analyzed using semiotic visual analysis to explore who the waiting rooms represented by coding the pictures, brochures, and magazines by gender using a manifest analysis, where the researchers coded what the pictures physically entailed, and a latent analysis, where the meaning of those pictures was discerned. In addition, 281 parental observations were completed at 25 of the CHCs by two observers. Inter-rater reliability was established and consensus was reached by using prescribed definitions of the waiting rooms.

Results

Only 8 CHCs were categorized as Family-Centered, while 12 were Mother-Child Centered, 6 Child-Centered, 2 Women-Centered, and 3 were Neutral environments. The different designs between the categorized waiting rooms affected fathers’, but not the mothers’ involvement with respect to playing with their child and reading the posted information. When analyzing within one categorized environment, fathers were more likely to play with their child compared to mothers.

Conclusions

CHCs should consciously redesign their environments to also be inclusive of fathers so that they more habitually participate in their child’s health.

Keyword
Sweden, child health centers, environmental factors, parenting behavior, family policy, gender equality
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246553 (URN)10.1515/sem-2014-0046 (DOI)000351927800001 ()
Available from: 2015-03-09 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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