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Hauer, Amie
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Hauer, A. & Daniels, M. (2008). A Learning Theory Perspective on Running Open Ended Group Projects (OEGPs). Australian Computer Science Communications, 30(5), 85-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Learning Theory Perspective on Running Open Ended Group Projects (OEGPs)
2008 (English)In: Australian Computer Science Communications, ISSN 0157-3055, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Open ended problems, Ill-structured problem solving, Professional skills, Real-world problems, Theories of learning, Situated cognition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-15806 (URN)
Available from: 2008-03-13 Created: 2008-03-13 Last updated: 2009-05-26Bibliographically approved
Daniels, M. & Hauer, A. (2007). Balancing Scaffolding and Complexity in Open Ended Group Projects (OEGPs): A Learning Theory View. In: IEEE Frontiers in Education conference (pp. F2G1-F2G2).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing Scaffolding and Complexity in Open Ended Group Projects (OEGPs): A Learning Theory View
2007 (English)In: IEEE Frontiers in Education conference, 2007, p. F2G1-F2G2Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is a gap between the problems our students typically encounter in their education and the problems they are likely to be asked to solve in their future employments. It is convenient, both in terms of specification and assessment, in education to provide fairly well-structured problems, and many instructors view using such problems as a way to control what the students learn. Typical real-world problems are however ill-structured and we argue that working on well-structured problems does not prepare our students for the problems they will encounter in their professional life. Preparing our students for dealing with ill-structured, or open ended, problems is an educational challenge involving critical thinking skills, which most instructors and curriculum designers view as an important goal. This paper will focus on the use of Open Ended Group projects as an educational setting and address why it can be useful in reaching general goals of engineering education and how balanced scaffolding can help reaching those goals. The paper will also cover a concrete example to inspire education designers to better prepare our students for their future careers by improving their problem solving capabilities.

Keywords
Open ended problems, Ill-structured problem solving, Professional skills, Real-world problems, Theories of learning, Situated cognition.
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11458 (URN)
Available from: 2007-09-16 Created: 2007-09-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Daniels, M., Carbone, A., Hauer, A. & Moore, D. (2007). Ill-structured Problem Solving in Engineering Education. In: IEEE Frontiers in Education conference (pp. F3F1-F3F2).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ill-structured Problem Solving in Engineering Education
2007 (English)In: IEEE Frontiers in Education conference, 2007, p. F3F1-F3F2Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is a gap between the problems our students typically encounter in their education and the problems they are likely to be asked to solve in their future employments. It is convenient in education, both in specification and assessment, to provide fairly well-structured problems, and many instructors view using such problems as a way to manage the learning process. However, real-world problems are typically ill-structured and we argue that using only well-structured problems as learning examples does not prepare our students for the problems they will encounter in their professional life. Preparing students for dealing with ill-structured, or open ended, problems is an educational challenge involving critical thinking skills, which most instructors and curriculum designers view as an important goal of the learning process. This panel is designed to address issues of open or ill-structured problems from learning aspects. The panel will also cover concrete examples to inspire education designers preparing students for their future careers by improving their problem solving capabilities through use of ill-structured problems as learning examples.

Keywords
Ill-structured problem solving, Professional skills, Open ended problems, Real-world problems, Theories of learning, Situated cognition
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11459 (URN)
Note
A panelAvailable from: 2007-09-16 Created: 2007-09-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Hauer, A. & Daniels, M. (2006). Computing in a business context: a way to motivate and prepare. In: SEFI 34th Annual Conference: Engineering Education and Active Students (pp. 47).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computing in a business context: a way to motivate and prepare
2006 (English)In: SEFI 34th Annual Conference: Engineering Education and Active Students, 2006, p. 47-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the summer of 2005 a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing course was held where business applications and scenarios were used to place the computing concepts of P2P systems in a more real-world perspective. The features of different P2P applications were given a dual focus of computing systems and business application, and thus set apart from being studied solely as a pure computing phenomenon towards also being looked at from a real use perspective. We will report on some findings from the course and how the course will be updated based on these findings. The original aim is to develop a course where a business context is to be used to motivate students to learn computing at a deeper and more cross-disciplinary level, as well as to prepare students for their professional life working with real people of different skills and knowledge in real situations.

We believe that courses incorporating cross-disciplinary and more real-world situations will increase recruitment of new students, due to such courses being viewed as more holistic overlay of a traditional computing course; and further, that student retention of concepts will improve as the students obtain a broader understanding of the use and context of computing knowledge and skills.

Keywords
student recruitment, student motivation, multi-disciplinary studies, computing, business
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-21245 (URN)978-91-631-8387-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2007-09-16 Created: 2007-09-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12
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