uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Haldén, Peter
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Haldén, P. (2013). A non-sovereign modernity: Attempts to engineer stability in the Balkans 1820-1890. Review of International Studies, 39(2), 337-359
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A non-sovereign modernity: Attempts to engineer stability in the Balkans 1820-1890
2013 (English)In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 337-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social theory almost invariably equates modernity with the sovereign state. This equation must be nuanced because the modern era and modern strategies of international stability have contained non-sovereign units. In the nineteenth century, the Great Powers tried to create international stability by engineering forms of rule in Europe. These strategies built on distinctively modern ideas: the possibility of radically breaking with the past, redesigning political organisations, and actively controlling political events through rational planning. Throughout the century the Great Powers alternated between creating non-sovereign units and creating sovereign units as instruments in these stabilising strategies. The degree of trust between the Great Powers accounts for the shift between the two strategies: they tended to create non-sovereign units when mutual trust was high and sovereign ones when trust was low. This article analyses Great Power strategies of designing forms of rule in the Balkans between 1820 and 1878. Like in previous centuries, nineteenth-century Europe actually consisted of two parallel but connected systems: the egalitarian system of sovereign states and a system of non-sovereign entities. Non-sovereign units disappeared only late in the century and this process was affected by the increasing rivalry and mistrust between the sovereign states.

Keywords
Anarchy, concert of Europe, international relations theory, modernity, system of states
National Category
Political Science Sociology History
Research subject
Political Science; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191590 (URN)10.1017/S0260210512000101 (DOI)000316917700006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 435-2008-613
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2013). Republican continuities in the Vienna Order and the German Confederation (1815-66). European Journal of International Relations, 19(2), 281-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Republican continuities in the Vienna Order and the German Confederation (1815-66)
2013 (English)In: European Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1354-0661, E-ISSN 1460-3713, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 281-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article argues that the German Confederation — deutscher Bund — (1815–66) was a form of rule built on early modern republican political theory. It was a ‘Compound Republic’ form of rule constructed to prevent the emergence of a system of sovereign German states as well as a single sovereign German state. Its purpose was maintaining peace and stability in Europe and safeguarding the autonomy of its member polities. Contemporary statesmen, intellectuals and scholars saw these purposes as complementary. A non-sovereign, polycentric and republican organization of the German lands was regarded as a natural and necessary component in a stable Europe free from war and revolutions. This article analyses the origins, institutions and policies of the German Confederation, with particular regard to how the means of organized violence were organized. It thereby demonstrates the implementation of republican ideas and purposes in the Bund. The article situates the Bund in 19th-century thinking about European stability and sovereignty, further demonstrating the prevalence of republican ideas on international order. Republican political theories and institutions differed sharply from modern theories and models of international relations. Consequently, the history of international politics, the European system of states and state-formation must be re-conceptualized more in line with historical realities. 

Keywords 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
concert, historical sociology, international history, limited sovereignty, sovereignty, states-system
National Category
Political Science History
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166650 (URN)10.1177/1354066111421037 (DOI)000319744800005 ()
Projects
Funded by Swedish Research Council grant number 435-2008-613.
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 435-2008-613.
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2012). A Call for Hermeneutical Perspectives on Climate Change and Conflict: The Case of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Journal of International Relations and Development, 15(1), 1-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Call for Hermeneutical Perspectives on Climate Change and Conflict: The Case of Ethiopia and Eritrea
2012 (English)In: Journal of International Relations and Development, ISSN 1408-6980, E-ISSN 1581-1980, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on climate change and conflict has been conducted in ways that may lead us to overlook risks of conflicts and miss opportunities to prevent them. In response, this article formulates an analytical framework based on hermeneutical perspectives on social action.The main argument is that climate factors are not the main drivers of conflict under conditions of climate change. Instead, the main mechanisms are how actors interpret their historical experiences and roles as guides for future actions and how international structures shape the scope of action in a constitutive fashion.Previous research has tended to construct the past as an objective assemblage of occurrences. However, the past can never be an ‘objective’ series of events and causal connections. Actors always interpret the past and construct it as meaning-laden history. History, in turn, is fundamentally ambiguous; it can be constructed as a story that has to be continued or one that needs to be broken with. An analysis of the relation between Ethiopia and Eritrea illustrates the theoretical framework. It concludes that despite their past enmity, there is no imminent risk of conflict in connection with climate change but strong reasons for both actors to maintain status quo.

Keywords
Climate Change, Conflict, Causation, Horn of Africa, Systems Theory, Structural IR
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145538 (URN)10.1057/jird.2011.14 (DOI)000300546000001 ()
Available from: 2011-02-09 Created: 2011-02-09 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2012). Composite Republics and International Society. In: : . Paper presented at Evolutionary Leftovers? Going past to the future of politics. University of Copenhagen, April 10, 2012..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composite Republics and International Society
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Republicanism, European Union, Empire, Holy Roman Empire, Modernity
National Category
Political Science Sociology History and Archaeology
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191597 (URN)
Conference
Evolutionary Leftovers? Going past to the future of politics. University of Copenhagen, April 10, 2012.
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2015-08-11Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2012). From Empire to Federation and Commonwealth: Orders in Europe 1200-1800. In: Peter Fibiger Band and Dariusz Kolodziejczyck (Ed.), Universal Empire: A Comparative Approach to Imperial Culture and Representation in Eurasian History (pp. 280-303). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Empire to Federation and Commonwealth: Orders in Europe 1200-1800
2012 (English)In: Universal Empire: A Comparative Approach to Imperial Culture and Representation in Eurasian History / [ed] Peter Fibiger Band and Dariusz Kolodziejczyck, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, p. 280-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
Keywords
Empire, Society, Hierarchy, International System
National Category
Political Science Sociology History and Archaeology
Research subject
Political Science; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191592 (URN)978-1-107-02267-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2013-08-06Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2012). Preservation against immoderate appetites: Republican Political Theory and International Politics 1600-2000. In: : . Paper presented at The CONCEPTA Research Training Seminar “The Concepts of Republic: Local, Regional and International” Hosted by the research center Res Publica, European University at St Petersburg, December 6-7, 2012..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preservation against immoderate appetites: Republican Political Theory and International Politics 1600-2000
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Republicanism, European Union, Holy Roman Empire, German Confederation, Modernity
National Category
Political Science History and Archaeology Sociology
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191601 (URN)
Conference
The CONCEPTA Research Training Seminar “The Concepts of Republic: Local, Regional and International” Hosted by the research center Res Publica, European University at St Petersburg, December 6-7, 2012.
Note

Keynote lecture

Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2015-08-11Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2011). Understanding the EU, the US and their external spheres of rule: Republican synergies, destructive feedbacks and dependencies. Journal of Political Power, 4(3), 433-450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the EU, the US and their external spheres of rule: Republican synergies, destructive feedbacks and dependencies
2011 (English)In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 433-450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both the US and the European Union (EU) have been analysed as empires. In contrast, this article argues that a reconstructed republican theory centred on the fear of domination reveals deeper dynamics in both entities. Both entities have external spheres of influence. While the US is not dependent on this sphere to sustain internal stability, the EU is. When the EU enlargement ends and the external sphere is absorbed, the EU’s stability and legitimacy might be at risk. A possible solution lies in the European Neighbourhood Policy. Strengthening it would increase the EU’s control over its environment and its normative aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2011
Keywords
The European Union, the US, republicanism, empire, EU enlargement
National Category
Political Science Sociology
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166654 (URN)10.1080/2158379X.2011.624749 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Haldén, P. (2006). Compound Republics as viable Political Systems: A Comparison of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and the European Union. (Doctoral dissertation). Florence: European University Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compound Republics as viable Political Systems: A Comparison of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and the European Union
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Florence: European University Institute, 2006
Keywords
Holy Roman Empire, European Union, Republicanism, IR theory, English School, Systems Theory
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145555 (URN)
Public defence
(English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-03-04 Created: 2011-02-09 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications