Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Egnell, Robert
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Egnell, R. & Ångström, J. (2012). Afghanistans trettioåriga krig (1ed.). In: Karin Aggestam & Kristine Höglund (Ed.), Om krig och fred: en introduktion till freds- och konfliktstudier (pp. 129-143). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Afghanistans trettioåriga krig
2012 (Swedish)In: Om krig och fred: en introduktion till freds- och konfliktstudier / [ed] Karin Aggestam & Kristine Höglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 129-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188648 (URN)978-91-44-07558-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2013-02-06Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R., Hojem, P. & Berts, H. (2012). Implementing a Gender Perspective in Military Organisations and Operations: The Swedish Armed Forces Model.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing a Gender Perspective in Military Organisations and Operations: The Swedish Armed Forces Model
2012 (English)Report (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since UNSCR 1325 was passed, the Swedish Armed Forces have gone through an impressive process of change from limited early projects to an institutionalised gender organisation that has worked to mainstream a gender perspective, to conduct training, and to establish specific gender-related functions, such as Gender Field Advisors and Gender Focal Points. The Gender Field Advisors have during this process been deployed with Swedish and international units in conflicts around the world and have thereby gained important experience as well as continued to refine the Swedish approach to gender implementation in military operations. The latest development has been the establishment of the Nordic Centre for Gender in Military Operations, which will seek to function as a platform for continued implementation of a gender perspective in both Sweden and abroad.

The purpose of this report is to increase the understanding of these organisational processes, the driving factors and roadblocks within the armed forces, the activities conducted in the field and their impact at home and in the area of operations is essential to the continuing implementation of UNSCR 1325 and the implementation of a gender perspective more broadly. This understanding has the potential to provide support and lessons for similar processes in the armed forces of other countries and even other contexts.

Publisher
p. 123
Series
Report / Department of Peace and Conflict Research, ISSN 0566-8808 ; 98
Keywords
gender and war, gender mainstreaming, women, gender perspective, United Nations, sexual violence, Afghanistan, Swedish Armed Forces, peace operations, gender equality, military organisation, gender.
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-186917 (URN)978-91-506-2319-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-11-30 Created: 2012-11-30 Last updated: 2012-12-11Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R. (2011). Lessons from Helmand, Afghanistan: What now for British counterinsurgency?. International Affairs, 87(2), 297-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from Helmand, Afghanistan: What now for British counterinsurgency?
2011 (English)In: International Affairs, ISSN 0020-5850, E-ISSN 1468-2346, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 297-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A number of lessons stand out from the analysis of British operations in Helmand between 2006 and 2010: First, contrary to the legacy, British competence in the field of counterinsurgency is neither natural nor innate through regimental tradition or historical experience. The slow adaptation in Helmand is an indication that the expertise British forces developed in past operations is but a distant folktale within the British Armed Forces. Substantially changed training, painful relearning of counterinsurgency principles, and changed mindsets are therefore necessary to avoid repeated early failures in the future. Moreover, despite eventually adapting tactically to the situation and task in Helmand, the British Armed Forces proved inadequate in dealing with the task assigned to them for two key reasons. First, the resources of the British military are simply too small for large scale complex engagements such as those in Helmand or southern Iraq. Second, the over-arching comprehensive approach, especially the civilian aspects of operations that underpinned Britain’s historical successes with counterinsurgency, is today missing. In the end, the article calls for greater realism about what British contributions to international intervention can achieve – a strategy in tune with actual resources.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146708 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-2346.2011.00974.x. (DOI)000288508700003 ()
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R. & Haldén, P. (2010). Contextualising international state-building. Conflict, Security and Development, 10(4), 431-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualising international state-building
2010 (English)In: Conflict, Security and Development, ISSN 1467-8802, E-ISSN 1478-1174, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 431-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
State-building, state-failure
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145543 (URN)10.1080/14678802.2010.500505 (DOI)
Note
Special Issue: Critical approaches and new methods in statebuildingAvailable from: 2011-02-09 Created: 2011-02-09 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R. (2010). Reviews: Politics and the Military: S. J. H. Rietjens, Civil—Military Cooperation in Response to a Complex Emergency: Just Another Drill? Leiden: Brill, 2008, 253 pp., ISBN 9789004163270, US$99.00 [Review]. International Sociology, September, 739-742
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reviews: Politics and the Military: S. J. H. Rietjens, Civil—Military Cooperation in Response to a Complex Emergency: Just Another Drill? Leiden: Brill, 2008, 253 pp., ISBN 9789004163270, US$99.00
2010 (English)In: International Sociology, ISSN 0268-5809, E-ISSN 1461-7242, Vol. September, p. 739-742Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146702 (URN)
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Egnell, R. (2010). The organised hypocrisy of international state-building. Conflict, Security and Development, 10(4), 465-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The organised hypocrisy of international state-building
2010 (English)In: Conflict, Security and Development, ISSN 1467-8802, E-ISSN 1478-1174, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 465-491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper uses the concept of 'organised hypocrisy' as a means of making sense of the inconsistencies and contradictions in contemporary theory and practice of international state-building. While organised hypocrisy in international politics allows states and organisations to maintain systemic stability and legitimacy by managing irreconcilable pressures that might otherwise render them unable to operate effectively, this paper argues that organised hypocrisy also has negative impacts on the operational effectiveness of state-building. It allows organisations to engage in operations without sufficient resources, thereby seriously undermining operational effectiveness and the credibility of international state-building as a legitimate political tool. Organised hypocrisy also creates false expectations among the local and global populations and thereby decreases the credibility of the strategic narrative that is supposed to explain and make sense of the transformation processes to the general public. The paper also explores a number of options for dealing with organised hypocrisy in a way that could improve the effectiveness of international state-building.

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146706 (URN)
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Egnell, R. (2010). Winning 'hearts and minds'?: A Critical Analysis of Counter-Insurgency Operations in Afghanistan. Civil Wars, 12(3), 282-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Winning 'hearts and minds'?: A Critical Analysis of Counter-Insurgency Operations in Afghanistan
2010 (English)In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 282-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article conducts a critical analysis of the historical lessons, theassumptions and the conduct of ‘hearts and minds’ approaches to counterinsurgency.This results in challenges. Theoretically the ‘hearts and minds’approach is rooted in modernisation theory and a normative Western approachto legitimacy that fails to live up to the expectations of the local population.The approach is also based on lessons from past successes such as the British1950s campaign in Malaya. However, a great contextual shift has taken placesince then and the relevance of past experiences is therefore questionable ina context of complex state-building in the wake of intervention. This also haspractical consequences as we seek to rectify the often misapplied approachesof today.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146700 (URN)
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Egnell, R. (2009). Complex peace operations and civil-military relations: Winning the peace. Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex peace operations and civil-military relations: Winning the peace
2009 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2009. p. 219
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146701 (URN)
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18
Egnell, R. & Haldén, P. (2009). Laudable, ahistorical and overambitious: Security sector reform meets state formation theory.. Conflict, Security and Development, 9(1), 27-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laudable, ahistorical and overambitious: Security sector reform meets state formation theory.
2009 (English)In: Conflict, Security and Development, ISSN 1467-8802, E-ISSN 1478-1174, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 27-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Security sector reform (SSR) is a concept that is highly visible within policy and practice circles and that increasingly shapes international programmes for development assistance, security co-operation and democracy promotion. This paper examines the concept and practice of SSR using theories of the state and state formation within a historical-philosophical perspective. The paper recognises that the processes of SSR are highly laudable and present great steps forward towards more holistic conceptions of security and international development. However, the main argument of the paper is that we should be careful of having too high expectations of the possibility of SSR fulfilling its ambitious goals of creating states that are both stable and democratic and accountable. Instead, we should carefully determine what level of ambition is realistic for each specific project depending on local circumstances. A further argument of this paper is that legitimate order and functioning state structures are prerequisites and preconditions for successful democratisation and accountability reforms within the security sector.

Keywords
State-building, state-failure, state-formation
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-145546 (URN)10.1080/14678800802704903 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-02-09 Created: 2011-02-09 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R. (2009). Vad gjorde vi för nytta?: svenskt deltagande i fredsfrämjande insatser sedan 1945. In: Lena Holger (Ed.), Fredssoldater (pp. 135-165). Stockholm: Armémuseum förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad gjorde vi för nytta?: svenskt deltagande i fredsfrämjande insatser sedan 1945
2009 (Swedish)In: Fredssoldater / [ed] Lena Holger, Stockholm: Armémuseum förlag , 2009, p. 135-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Armémuseum förlag, 2009
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146709 (URN)
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18
Projects
Organisational culture, norms and modern warfare; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Noreen, E., Sjöstedt, R. & Ångström, J. (2017). Why small states join big wars: The case of Sweden in Afghanistan 2002–2014. International Relations, 31(2), 145-168Noreen, E. & Ångström, J. (2016). Swedish Strategy and the Afghan Experience: from neutrality to ambiguity. In: Arita Holmberg & Jan Hellenberg (Ed.), The Swedish Presence in Afghanistan: Security and Defence Transformation (pp. 31-54). London: RoutledgeNoreen, E. & Ångström, J. (2015). A Catch-All Strategic Narrative: Target Audiences and Swedish Troop Contribution to ISAF in Afghanistan. In: Beatrice De Graaf, George Dimitriu and Jens Ringsmose (Ed.), Strategic narratives, public opinion and war: winning domestic support for the Afghan War (pp. 282-299). London: RoutledgeÅngström, J. & Honig, J. W. (2012). Regaining Strategy: Small Powers, Strategic Culture, and Escalation in Afghanistan. Journal of Strategic Studies, 35(5), 663-687
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications