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Asztalos Morell, IldikóORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3442-187X
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Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Sätre, A.-M. & Asztalos Morell, I. (Eds.). (2016). Attitudes, poverty and agency in Russia and Ukraine. New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes, poverty and agency in Russia and Ukraine
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the main ideas behind this book was to trace continuities from the Soviet time to post-Soviet Russia. There are many similarities between Russia and Ukraine, indicating such a continuation. Russia and Ukraine had a lot in common in terms of culture, language and history, partly also because of their common origin. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, however, the two independent countries chose different routes of development. This makes it possible to distinguish between the effects of politics/reforms on the one hand, and the impacts from the Soviet system on the other. After some more or less chaotic development paths in the 1990s, showing clear differences between the two countries, and before the contemporary conflict broke out in Eastern Ukraine (2013), they had once again more similarities in terms of political leadership and policies in general.

The chapters in this book focus on Ukraine and on two regions in Russia: Nizhny Novgorod and Archangelsk. Contributors look at attitudes towards poverty and poor people; strategies of the poor; and policies against poverty. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2016. p. 170
Keywords
poverty, gender, masculinity, policy, agency, elite, attitude
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274605 (URN)9781138957640 (ISBN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty, Vetenskapsrådet
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-23 Created: 2016-01-23 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). Can renewable energy contribute to poverty reduction?: Study of Romafa, a Hungarian LEADER. In: Leo Granberg, Kjell Andersson & Imre Kovách (Ed.), Evaluating the European Approach to rural development: Grass-roots Esperiences of the LEADER programme (pp. 183-206). Farnham: Ashgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can renewable energy contribute to poverty reduction?: Study of Romafa, a Hungarian LEADER
2015 (English)In: Evaluating the European Approach to rural development: Grass-roots Esperiences of the LEADER programme / [ed] Leo Granberg, Kjell Andersson & Imre Kovách, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, p. 183-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

After Hungary’s accession to the European Union in 2002, LEADER became a key model for rural development, thus providing the tools to local action groups (LAGs) to define the targets for local development (See alo Csurgó and Kovách in Chapter 4 of this volume). FA LEADER,[1] founded in 2008, is based on a consortium of 44 resource-poor, small to larger size municipalities in the areas surrounding an industrial city in northeast Hungary. The strategy of the FA LEADER is to strengthen the position of municipalities and the citizens by increasing their energy self-sufficiency and decreasing their dependency on large-scale suppliers of energy in monopoly positions through the utilisation of renewable energy sources. Further, the FA LEADER’s energy villages are to utilise ‘clean’, renewable energy sources, including agricultural waste, warm sources, wind, kitchen waste, manure, water streams and thermo energy from mines for the production of energy and heat. These energy sources are not being utilised at the moment and getting rid of the waste is an expense for the communities. Thirdly, the project aims to develop the communities through the creation of new workplaces for inhabitants with low levels of education and those who are qualified but currently unemployed. Fourthly, FA LEADER aims to increase the quality of life of the inhabitants through cleaning the communities of garbage and improving slum areas where inhabitants had no resources or a previous willingness to engage in such activities. This would also improve the possibilities for developing village tourism.

Romafa is a specific sub-project of FA LEADER targeting marginalised Roma enclaves aiming at ‘promoting the energy production of small communities for decreasing their dependency on social benefits and creating a self-sufficient source of income’ by the joint utilisation of renewable energy sources, the development of the traditional, hierarchical system of representation, the support of Romani traditions, religion, morality, culture, arts, education and the support of self-sufficient production among Romani households.

Three concrete goals were identified targeting Romani communities through the development of 15 municipal and small regional ecological waste collection and processing ‘eco-units’ for concrete waste according to EU standards:

1.      Biogas generators could be operated by deliveries of biomass gathered by resource-poor Romani (and non-Romani), who could either be compensated with cash payments or energy coupons. The compensation model would increase the self-interest, self-respect and autonomous agency of those participating to increase the maximisation of their inputs. Meanwhile, they could promote their respectability as citizens.

2.      Another plan would initiate the creation of a waste-management system. In this plan, low educated, unemployed Romani (and non-Romani) could find employment by selecting waste under controlled working conditions. The products could be sold to aggregates, which would then reutilise diverse waste such as pet bottles, rubber, etc. in order to generate energy. Additionally, a reparation workshop could contribute to the reutilisation of repairable tools found in the waste.

3.      Finally, under the leadership of local Romani leaders, marginalised Romani village communities could be upgraded and hygienic standards increased and maintained, similar to the clean and established villages and small towns of the region. This would be achieved by the self-organising of Romani communities.

The sub-projects for Renewable energy systems (RES) technology-based municipal energy plants were the first to be realised. On the contrary, the realisation of the Romafa was still waiting for resource-strong stakeholders, at the time of this research (Febuary 2012 to May 2013). No municipalities or private entrepreneurs seemed ready to support the Romani Minority Self-government (RMS or in Hungarian CKÖ) initiatives. Instead, the municipalities asked were satisfied with the current arrangement for waste management. Three biogas aggregators were in the phase of ‘projectification’. Two of these planned units were to be arranged in collaboration with several municipalities and they planned to introduce a coupon system, though none of the planned plants were envisioned to be connected to the electricity supply of marginalised housing areas and were not to be placed adjacent to Romani settlements.

By focusing on the Romafa project’s efforts to incorporate social aspects into the utilisation of renewable energy, this chapter will contribute to our understanding of how different interests influence the targeting and realisation of developmental goals, aimed at improving the living conditions of marginalised groups, and whether and under which conditions the new model of governance can work, on the local level, for the benefit of those with the least resources.

[1] FA LEADER is one of Hungary’s regional leader groups. It is a pseudo-name, as are the names used for sub-projects and persons in this chapter in order to keep them anonymous.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Farnham: Ashgate, 2015
Keywords
LEADER, local governance, Hungary, Roma, poverty, empowerment
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274611 (URN)9781472443786 (ISBN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-24 Created: 2016-01-24 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). Gender Equality: An intersectional analysis with focus on Roma women in Hungarian NGOs. Baltic Worlds, 8(3-4), 34-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Equality: An intersectional analysis with focus on Roma women in Hungarian NGOs
2015 (English)In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 8, no 3-4, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

I will focus on the ways that agents of NGOs engaged with Roma and/or women’s recognition struggles can be classified, and how these constructions make sense of the conditions forming the lives of Roma women and furthermore how Roma women’s interests are positioned. Detacting the intersecting aspects of ethnic-, gender-, and class-based relations that constitute Roma women’s position, I seek to identify which segments of the complex of relations different NGOs articulate as central. I aim to explore whether Roma women’s NGOs can be seen as more reflexive of the intersectional complexity of Roma women’s relations compared to Roma and women’s organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2015
Keywords
Roma Studies, intersectional analysis, gender equality, civil society, discrimination, marginalities
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274184 (URN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-23 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). On the Roma Precarious Experience Facing Free Christianism. In: Donatella della Porta, Sakari Hänninen, Martti Siisiäinen, Tiina Silvasti (Ed.), The New Social Division: Making and Unmaking Precariousness (pp. 139-158). New York: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Roma Precarious Experience Facing Free Christianism
2015 (English)In: The New Social Division: Making and Unmaking Precariousness / [ed] Donatella della Porta, Sakari Hänninen, Martti Siisiäinen, Tiina Silvasti, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 139-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Globalization and the transition to a service society, together with a strengthening of neoliberalism in governance, led to a changing balance between capital and welfare and the growth of what Guy Standing (2011) has named the precariat. This implied declining labour security and labour costs and the increased flexibilization of labour. Grounds for eligibility to social rights weakened, and an increasing section of the labour force became excluded from these rights, while a rising proportion of the population found themselves unemployable and part of a growing underclass (Castells, 2010).

There is a need for further research concerning Central and Eastern European (CEE)[SPi1]  countries, which provide a specific context for the formation of the precariat due to their roots in state socialist regimes prior to the neoliberal turn. In addition, the impact of stratifying forces such as gender, ethnicity, and religion on the development of the precariat has been more neglected. Furthermore, the focus has been on processes generating precariousness and marginalization. Less attention has been paid to resilience and forces that can potentially counteract precarization. This chapter is intended to contribute to research concerning the three areas above. It will focus on the example of CEE Roma following post-socialist transition – a group identified as an ethnified/racialized underclass (Ladányi and Szelényi, 2004) – with special consideration given to dynamics of resilience and change.

Precariousness refers to a human condition threatened by falling outside. Roma communities, throughout their history, have been composed of groups that have suffered from exclusion and persecution. Their precariousness prevailed even during the state socialist period’s materialistically conceived social integration project, since the Roma constituted the unskilled reserve army of state socialist industrialization and they were constrained in their freedom of ethnic identity construction and association.

Post-socialist economic transition resulted in mass exclusion from the labour force, where the precarization of Roma intensified, since the shutting down of former heavy industries and mines led to the loss of unskilled jobs (Kemény et al., 2004; Kovács, 2008; Vajda and Dupcsik, 2008; Váradi, 2010; Bodrogi and Kádár, 2013). The period following the major epoch of transition has not led to the creation of work opportunities, allowing the integration of those who became marginalized in the first phase. Those Roma who live in peripheral rural communities can be seen as multiply marginalized, due to lower levels of education compared to majority society, higher levels of exclusion from the labour market, and geographic isolation from labour opportunities. Neoliberal and neoconservative turns in welfare policies displaced the state socialist models, in which work was both a right and a duty, opening for social rights (Szalai, 2007). The state transferred the task of poverty management to municipalities and to the civil sphere. These efforts to a large degree became conditional on local welfare regimes (Szalai, 2007; Asztalos Morell, 2011). Needs-based rights opened for moralizing between deserving and undeserving poor, where Romanness and undeservingness often unhappily associated in discourses concerning eligibility (Schwartz, 2012). Kligman (2001) argues that ‘“Roma” as a category has been expanded, in certain contexts, to essentialize a purported relationship between “race” and “poverty”’ (Kligman, 2001, p. 63). Thus in CEE, poverty obtained a ‘Roma face’ (p. 64) and Roma were accused of being poor due to their allegedly essentialist features.

Experiences of social and economic exclusion are often coupled with internal syndromes of social deprivation and anomy. One explanation for this anomy complementary to structural and discriminatory explanations is its association with a culture of poverty characterized by lack of long-term perspective and lack of trust both within the community and outwards (Ladányi and Szelényi, 2004).

Bourdieu (1986) explained the reproduction of social inequalities to be related to the differential accumulation and transfer between material and immaterial assets. This study focuses on the dynamic relation between the material and immaterial aspects of precariousness and approaches the role of norms as links of mediation between these spheres. From this perspective, religious beliefs can also be understood to rest on norms regulating conducts of life (Weber, 2003). Within this controlled and repressed sphere of religiosity of state socialism, non-established religious congregations occupied a specifically precarious situation. These religious movements were not only treated as sects and deviants by politics but were also resisted by the established churches. The Roma were typically deprived of religious practice and spiritual identity during this period, due to the unwelcoming attitude of main traditional churches. Conversely, missionizing among the Roma emerged among the non-established, so-called Free Christian congregations (Kopasz, 2011). During the post-socialist transition, most of the Roma continue to live under spiritual deprivation. Although most historical denominations have initiated specific Roma pastorations, Free Christian churches continue to be the most engaged in addressing Roma as subjects of religious transformation, offering them subjectivity and salvation through confession and religious revival according to the norms of the true believers (Bartl, 2013). The paramount role of free churches for the spiritual wakening of Roma communities has been internationally observed (Thurfjell and Marsh, 2014).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015
Keywords
free christian, Roma, precarity, poverty
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274610 (URN)9781137509338 (ISBN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-24 Created: 2016-01-24 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). Self-sacrificing Motherhood: Reconciling Traumatic Life Experiences of Hungarian Collectivisation. In: Melanie Ilic & Dalia Leinarte (Ed.), The Soviet Past in the Post-Socialist Present: Methodology and Ethics in Russian, Baltic and Central european Oral History and Memory Studies (pp. 179-198). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-sacrificing Motherhood: Reconciling Traumatic Life Experiences of Hungarian Collectivisation
2015 (English)In: The Soviet Past in the Post-Socialist Present: Methodology and Ethics in Russian, Baltic and Central european Oral History and Memory Studies / [ed] Melanie Ilic & Dalia Leinarte, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 179-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research that questions the portrayal of women as victims of state socialism and patriarchy or views them as a simple means utilised by state socialism to achieve its goals addresses the issue of women’s identities as sources for agency. There is a growing interest in exploring women’s life experiences as formed in socially as well as time and space-bound citizenship. Women’s experiences have been elucidated in intersecting class and ethnic positions. Although collectivisation transformed agrarian society more than was seen in any other sphere of Hungarian life, rural women’s understandings of the changing context have been underrepresented. While domestic labour and motherhood have been identified as central to women’s subordination, recent research has raised the question of whether self-sacrificing motherhood can be the source of historical agency. This chapter explores how understandings of good motherhood were formed in the context of changing life conditions related to collectivisation in Hungary; and what was the importance of understandings of ‘self-sacrificing motherhood’ in the constructions of these women’s self-identities and for their agency. This chapter also problematizes the ethical concerns arising during fieldwork and analysis, and examines recollections of former traumatizing experiences in later life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2015
Keywords
memory, life story, trauma, collectivisation, Hungary, motherhood
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274609 (URN)9781138933453 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-24 Created: 2016-01-24 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). Social farming as means of poverty reduction in Hungary. Paper presented at Paper presented at the workshop: The social meaning of food, Budapest, 16–17 June, 2015. sociohu, 84-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social farming as means of poverty reduction in Hungary
2015 (English)In: sociohu, ISSN 2063-0468, p. 84-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is to set focus on innovative ways to combat food poverty in rural Hungary. Food poverty is associated with malnutrition which can refer both to the lack of food and its dissatisfying quality. Food poverty in the post-socialist rural context does not emerge as a consequence of natural catastrophes or lacking accessibility to food. Rather, it is the outcome of the unequal distribution of incomes and resources. Methods of overcoming food-poverty emerge primarily in the interplay between post-socialist welfare institutions and civil society initiatives, even if market agents occupy an increasing role in neo-neoliberal regimes as donators of charity and resources or as collaborators in poverty alleviation projects. Municipalities work within the paradigms of the welfare state and its social benefit system as redistributors of state resources, in contrast civil society agents represent partial interests and work from principles independent of the state redistributive logic.

Therefore, it is of interest to explore in which way poverty relief programmes put emphasis on the importance of community development and participation of marginalized groups in the development of individual and group resources necessary for overcoming their exclusion. The paper explores municipality versus civil organization approaches along the dimensions of agency; whether and if so in which way these social food projects worked for the empowerment of marginalized groups. In this pursuit I focus on immaterial aspects of empowerment, where, as argued above, the development of social resources constitutes a central role. Furthermore, the paper explores the differences and potential synergies between municipality and civil organization based social agriculture projects aiming to combat marginalization welfare dependency.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Budapest: , 2015
Keywords
food poverty, social farming, empowerment, ngo, municipality
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274612 (URN)10.18030/SOCIO.HU.2015EN.83 (DOI)
Conference
Paper presented at the workshop: The social meaning of food, Budapest, 16–17 June, 2015
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-24 Created: 2016-01-24 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2015). Voicing Roma Women: Intersectional Marginalities and social entrepreneurship of a Roma women's NGO in Hungary. In: Yulia Gradskova & Sara Sanders (Ed.), Institutionalizing Gender Equality: Historical and Global Perspectives (pp. 149-173). Lanham: Lexington Books, 8(3-4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voicing Roma Women: Intersectional Marginalities and social entrepreneurship of a Roma women's NGO in Hungary
2015 (English)In: Institutionalizing Gender Equality: Historical and Global Perspectives / [ed] Yulia Gradskova & Sara Sanders, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2015, Vol. 8, no 3-4, p. 149-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper explores how the complexity of Roma women’s status is addressed in Szines Gyöngyök (SZGY) a Roma women’s NGO in Hungary:

Firstly, by analysing the ways in which Roma women’s multiple marginalities are constructed within their own communities and the broader society as well as in the public and private spheres. This approach highlights the workings of gender and ethnic discrimination and reveals the importance of maternalism as a counterhegemonic perspective for Roma women.

Secondly by investigating to what degree Roma women’s NGOs elaborate their programmes and initiatives in reference to broader gender equality frameworks. What are the economic dynamisms and dependencies behind NGO-isation and how do dependencies influence the processes of ideation of gender equality? Most importantly, the paper explores whether the ideation processes are empowering, participatory, bottom-up processes growing out of the culturally and socially specific conditions of the NGOs’ constituencies or are donor driven.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lanham: Lexington Books, 2015
Keywords
gender, Roma, women, ngo, intersectional
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274190 (URN)9781498516747 (ISBN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Available from: 2016-01-23 Created: 2016-01-20 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2014). “I do not understand how I became a farmer”: The small-peasant path to family farm enterprise in post-socialist rural Hungary. Development Studies Research, 1(1), 88-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I do not understand how I became a farmer”: The small-peasant path to family farm enterprise in post-socialist rural Hungary
2014 (English)In: Development Studies Research, ISSN 2166-5095, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family farm enterprises emerged in the transition to capitalism following the reprivatization and decollectivization of agriculture in Hungary. This paper explores the generative processes of capital accumulation. It focuses on the intergenerational transfer as well as the life time generation of material and immaterial resources that were mobilized for the creation of the family farm enterprise. The life stories of six family members belonging to three generations of a successful enterprise of low peasant origin were selected from fieldwork conducted between 2000 and 2007 exploring the specificities of the genesis of farms with small peasant roots. Immaterial capital assets were the most important for the expanded reproduction of the farm, while reprivatized land had mostly symbolic importance. The farm relied on traditional peasant cultural heritage, such as striving for autonomy, self-sacrificing work mentality and traditional forms of bonding social capital, in the form of kin and local community reciprocal work relations. Meanwhile, the farm needed nontraditional cultural capital, such as entrepreneurial mentality and bridging social capital to find suitable markets for the products. These later emerged through education, by learning from experience, establishing trust relationships and with the help of mentors.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxfordshire: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
family farm enterpise, entrepreneur, social capital, culturalcapital, post-socialism, Hungary
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-230548 (URN)10.1080/21665095.2014.916188 (DOI)
Projects
VR Generationsväxling
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-08-26 Created: 2014-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. & Tiurikova, I. (2014). Single Men, Single Stories: Alternative Paths in the Transition from the Late Soviet to the Neoliberal Market Economy in the Light of Life Stories. Debatte, 22(3), 329-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single Men, Single Stories: Alternative Paths in the Transition from the Late Soviet to the Neoliberal Market Economy in the Light of Life Stories
2014 (English)In: Debatte, ISSN 0965-156X, E-ISSN 1469-3712, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 329-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research investigates life strategies of physical worker Russian men, belonging to the generation of people who were the most active group in the late Soviet period, went through the collapse of USSR and the transformation to capitalism. The historical biographic perspective allows reproducing common social experiences which have formed this generation. The in depth biographical interviews were conducted with six men of age 46-63, single, with officially low income, who started their working lives in the public sector. The research shows the diversity of men's alternative life strategies to adjust to the neoliberal economy established after the collapse of the USSR. The paper explores the biographies as representations of diverse forms of masculinities formed along gender, age, social position and marital status based marginalization processes emerging in the transition context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
gender, Russia, post-socialist, intersectionality, masculinity, late Soviet period, transition period, immaterial assets, biographic method
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-242724 (URN)10.1080/0965156X.2014.988495 (DOI)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2220
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Asztalos Morell, I. (2014). Workfare with a human face?: Innovative utilization of public work in rural municipalities in Hungary. Metszetek, 3(4), 4-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workfare with a human face?: Innovative utilization of public work in rural municipalities in Hungary
2014 (English)In: Metszetek, ISSN 2063-6415, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 4-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Public work is currently the major national tool for the reintegration of the long-term unemployed into the world of labour in Hungary. As a result of the expansion of resources the government allotted to facilitate public work employment, labour statistics improved substantially. Nonetheless, public labour as an institution is objected to intense criticism. Since employment as public worker is not bound to citizenship rights, local municipalities have a large degree of discretion about selecting whom they hire. Criticism most often focuses on employment discrimination. In contrast, this research takes a progressive municipality, with anti-discriminatory profile as an example, where public work was adapted as a welfare, rather than purely workfare praxis. Uszka, a rural small-sized municipality, is characterized by high ethnified unemployment. Its politicians and administrators adapted varied strategies to help combat poverty and unemployment. The paper explores the place of public work in the context of social policy instruments and poverty reduction strategies applied and the degrees of freedom and limitations municipalities have in adapting state instruments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Debrecen: , 2014
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274189 (URN)
Projects
Negotiating poverty
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-01-23 Created: 2016-01-20 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3442-187X

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