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Rönnbäck, Patrik
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Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Björkvik, E., Blyth, S., Blicharska, M., Danley, B. & Rönnbäck, P. (2023). Informing obligations: Best practice information for catch‐and‐release in Swedish local recreational fisheries management. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 30(3), 310-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informing obligations: Best practice information for catch‐and‐release in Swedish local recreational fisheries management
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2023 (English)In: Fisheries Management and Ecology, ISSN 0969-997X, E-ISSN 1365-2400, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Catch-and-release (C&R) is a popular management tool that can support sustainable development of recreational fisheries, if anglers adopt scientifically informed “best practices.” However, although the role of best practices is widely established in the academic literature, this knowledge is not always disseminated to anglers. In this paper, we investigated if and to what extent local management organizations provided best practice information to anglers. Based on a sample of 331 Swedish organizations, we reviewed the websites through which these organizations sold fishing licenses. Our review demonstrated widespread use of C&R as a management tool yet a general lack of best practice information. Among the small fraction of organizations that mentioned best practices, most mentioned only a single practice, with little consistency among practices that received attention. In addition, best practice information was particularly lacking for pike (Esox Lucius) and perch (Perca fluviatilis), which are by far the most landed and released species nationally. We discovered major knowledge deficiencies that provide insights about where and how to focus efforts for improving best practice information, in the context of local recreational fisheries management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
C&R science, hierarchical clustering, inland waters, institutional grammar, local management, mandatory C&R
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-507503 (URN)10.1111/fme.12622 (DOI)000961359800001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227Swedish Research Council, 2016-00227
Available from: 2023-07-06 Created: 2023-07-06 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
van den Heuvel, L. & Rönnbäck, P. (2023). What you see isn't always what you get: On how anglers' fish stock perceptions are influenced by motivations, satisfaction and engagement. Fisheries Research, 258, Article ID 106519.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What you see isn't always what you get: On how anglers' fish stock perceptions are influenced by motivations, satisfaction and engagement
2023 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 258, article id 106519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recreational anglers collectively spend a great amount of time on fishing activities. While being out fishing, these anglers perceive various components of aquatic ecosystems, allowing them to accumulate knowledge of the ecological status of the system and the fish they are targeting in it. Such fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) is increasingly being recognized as a valuable source of information in fisheries research and management, but it has also been criticized for a lack of accuracy. People's perceptions of their environment are shaped by a variety of psychological and environmental factors, and the same is expected for anglers' perceptions of fish stocks and the resulting FEK. This study assessed anglers' perceived change in salmon and sea trout stocks at the Mo center dot rrum river in Sweden, comparing the year that they first fished there to the present (2019). In addition, effects on these perceptions of the anglers' motivations to fish, satisfaction with catches, and their engagement with this fishery were examined. The majority of the respondents perceived a negative trend for both species, even when the reported total catches during the year they first fished at Mo center dot rrum were lower than the present catches. Binomial regression models indicated significant influences of engagement at Mo center dot rrum on the anglers' stock trend perceptions. The results of this study emphasize the importance of understanding different individual angler characteristics when collecting and interpreting FEK. Moreover, the fact that anglers with a longer history at Mo center dot rrum had a more negative perception overall, regardless of actual stock status in their first year in this fishery, suggests the occurrence of the shifting baseline syndrome in recreational fisheries. Therefore, the prevailing narrative on stock trends and its effect on angler perceptions should be considered when using FEK.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Fishers? ecological knowledge, Angler perceptions, Catch orientation, Engagement, Accuracy
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-493166 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2022.106519 (DOI)000895506500002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227
Available from: 2023-01-12 Created: 2023-01-12 Last updated: 2023-01-12Bibliographically approved
van den Heuvel, L., Blicharska, M., Stensland, S. & Rönnbäck, P. (2022). Been there, done that?: Effects of centrality-to-lifestyle and experience use history on angling tourists' loyalty to a Swedish salmon fishery. Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism, 39, Article ID 100549.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Been there, done that?: Effects of centrality-to-lifestyle and experience use history on angling tourists' loyalty to a Swedish salmon fishery
2022 (English)In: Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism, ISSN 2213-0780, Vol. 39, article id 100549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The incorporation of theories and methods from tourism research in recreational fisheries research is not common practice, despite many parallels between the two research fields. Adopting a tourism perspective could contribute to our understanding of angling tourists' attitudes and preferences and help identify the factors affecting the recruitment and retention of anglers. The concept of destination loyalty reflects a tourist's intention to revisit or recommend a destination, and provides a suitable avenue for studying (repeated) visits to a fishing destination. This study assessed the destination loyalty of angling tourists targeting Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.) at the Mo spacing diaeresis rrum river in southern Sweden. A structural equation model validated positive relationships between the psychological dimensions of destination image, satisfaction, place attachment and destination loyalty. In addition, centrality of the angling activity to the anglers' life was identified as a precursor of place attachment and subsequent loyalty. Moreover, anglers with a high experience use history for fishing at Mo spacing diaeresis rrum scored higher than other anglers on several of the indicators for image, satisfaction, place attachment and loyalty. These results show how applying a tourism perspective to traditional recreational fisheries research may help to explain angler loyalty to a recreational fishery, which ultimately contributes to the management of visitor numbers and experiences. The measurement model used in this study can inform future studies involving angling destination loyalty and contribute to creating a universal measurement scale for this construct and its antecedents. Finally, this study holds several implications for fishing destination marketing and management in terms of supporting diversification of the visiting angler population and the experiences the destination provides.Management implications: The model presented in this study highlights the importance of destination image in promoting satisfaction, place attachment and ultimately destination loyalty in a fishing destination. Moreover, we discuss how understanding angler heterogeneity may inform selective marketing efforts and promote loyalty in a variety of anglers. Additionally, we suggest how improving catch and non-catch related destination attributes could enhance the quality of the fishing experience as a whole, which improves satisfaction and fosters place attachment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Fishing tourism, Fishing destination management, Satisfaction, Structural equation modeling, Revisit intentions
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-486784 (URN)10.1016/j.jort.2022.100549 (DOI)000861777100006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227
Available from: 2022-10-17 Created: 2022-10-17 Last updated: 2022-10-17Bibliographically approved
Persson-Fischier, U., Lindström, G., Larsson, M. & Rönnbäck, P. (2022). Fishing for sustainability: a case about recreational fishing, tourism, and sustainable entrepreneurship. In: Karin Wigger, Lise Aaboen, Dag Haneberg, Siri Jakobsen & Thomas Lauvås (Ed.), Reframing the Case Method in Entrepreneurship Education: Cases from the Nordic Countries (pp. 150-162). Cheltenham; Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fishing for sustainability: a case about recreational fishing, tourism, and sustainable entrepreneurship
2022 (English)In: Reframing the Case Method in Entrepreneurship Education: Cases from the Nordic Countries / [ed] Karin Wigger, Lise Aaboen, Dag Haneberg, Siri Jakobsen & Thomas Lauvås, Cheltenham; Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022, p. 150-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this case we follow the development of a tourism business in Sweden with high sustainability ambitions. We explore how the entrepreneur started, ran, and expanded his business, which offers recreational fishing for high-end customers from all over the world. The new firm works with value propositions, dealing with the common challenges of uncertainty, trying to get external funding, and finding suitable partners, all in light of sustainability—that is, the ways the entrepreneur tries to adjust his economic activities to the maximum carrying capacity, by carefully managing the natural resources his business relies upon (wild fish stock and the pristine wilderness of his sites). He is also trying to cooperate with and provide benefits to the local community in which his business operates. This case also illustrates some of the obstacles the entrepreneur encounters: the risk of losing access to the natural resource he relies upon as the local Sámi people suddenly, by court verdict, obtain exclusive rights to the fish; the problems of hiring local staff to benefit the community as they have other unpredictable activities to attend to (reindeer herding); the way his business credibility for the high-end market is threatened when local customers are served as they comprise a very different social segment; whether it is possible to claim a sustainable business as it involves a lot of air travel. This case provides learning opportunities connected to some of the challenges involved when trying to run a business, taking as points of departure the limits of nature and contributing socially while maintaining financial viability. Through this, the student will gain insights into many sustainability challenges facing an entrepreneurial venture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham; Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022
Keywords
Growth phase, Recreational fishing, Sustainable entrepreneurship, Effectuation, Co-creation, Control of natural resources and business development, Managing relations with locals, Resource management, Role play
National Category
Environmental Management Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-486825 (URN)10.4337/9781800881150.00026 (DOI)9781800881143 (ISBN)9781800881150 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-17 Created: 2022-10-17 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
Luthman, O., Jonell, M., Rönnbäck, P. & Troell, M. (2022). Strong and weak sustainability in Nordic aquaculture policies. Aquaculture, 550, Article ID 737841.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strong and weak sustainability in Nordic aquaculture policies
2022 (English)In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 550, article id 737841Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we critically analyze how sustainability is considered in aquaculture policies and strategies using the Nordic countries as a case. The strong versus weak sustainability concepts are used to define and clarify what sustainability aspects are central to each state. To illustrate these concepts further, we draw on and modify four mainstream environmental discourses defined by John Dryzek and apply them to the strong and weak sustainability dichotomy to help categorize how environmental sustainability is portrayed in Nordic aquaculture policies and strategies. Subsequently we apply the characteristics of the concepts to aquaculture and sustainability in the Nordic countries. This allows us to identify each state's depiction of sustainable aquaculture, compare these to one another and assess where the Nordic states position themselves regarding sustainability and aquaculture. Our findings show that the policies emphasize technological advancements, intensification, and economic growth, which correlates with weak sustainability. Environmental sustainability receives a significant role in the documents too but does not seem to trump increased intensification or profitability. All policies are heavily focused on fed aquaculture and in order to reduce negative impacts from aquaculture there is a need to incorporate key elements of strong sustainability in policies, including measures to reduce impacts from pollution and the spread of pathogens, use of high-grade food resources and energy consumption. This to transform the industry to sustainability rather than just making it less unsustainable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Aquaculture, Policy, Sustainability, Nordics
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-471676 (URN)10.1016/j.aquaculture.2021.737841 (DOI)000765399400009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227
Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Blyth, S. & Rönnbäck, P. (2022). To eat or not to eat, coastal sea trout anglers' motivations and perceptions of best practices for catch and release. Fisheries Research, 254, Article ID 106412.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To eat or not to eat, coastal sea trout anglers' motivations and perceptions of best practices for catch and release
2022 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 254, article id 106412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The wide variety of perspectives and actions of individual anglers contribute greatly to success or failure when adopting and implementing fisheries management tools. Catch-and-release (C&R) is one such tool where success is influenced by both variation in human factors, but also species and fishery specific characteristics. In this study, an intercept survey of 94 sea trout anglers in a C&R dominated fishery on the Swedish island of Gotland investigated motivations to release or retain catches, self-assessment of anglers' own ability to release fish, and their rating of the importance of various factors influencing the successful outcomes of C&R. Retention of catches was most strongly motivated by situations where anglers deemed the fish unlikely to survive, however more than half of anglers acknowledged being unaware of delayed mortality in released fish. The spawning status of an individual fish was the primary motivation for release, particularly among anglers that prefer to keep at least some of their catches. The roles of water temperature, using single, and barbless hooks were scored as significantly less important than other components contributing to the success of a release. Anglers that gave a favourable rating to their ability to release sea trout also gave greater importance to various factors influencing the success of release, reported higher catch per unit effort, and released a greater proportion of their catches. These findings are discussed in the context of bridging knowledge and behavioural gaps around best practices for C&R in this fishery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Catch-and-release, Recreational fisheries, Salmo trutta, Human dimensions, Angling
National Category
Ecology Fish and Wildlife Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-487109 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2022.106412 (DOI)000861667900005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00227
Available from: 2022-10-25 Created: 2022-10-25 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Ermgassen, P. S. E., Mukherjee, N., Worthington, T. A., Acosta, A., da Rocha Araujo, A. R., Beitl, C. M., . . . Spalding, M. (2021). Fishers who rely on mangroves: Modelling and mapping the global intensity of mangrove-associated fisheries. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 248, Article ID 107159.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fishers who rely on mangroves: Modelling and mapping the global intensity of mangrove-associated fisheries
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2021 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 248, article id 107159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mangroves are critical nursery habitats for fish and invertebrates, providing livelihoods for many coastal communities. Despite their importance, there is currently no estimate of the number of fishers engaged in mangrove associated fisheries, nor of the fishing intensity associated with mangroves at a global scale. We address these gaps by developing a global model of mangrove associated fisher numbers and mangrove fishing intensity. To develop the model, we undertook a three-round Delphi process with mangrove fisheries experts to identify the key drivers of mangrove fishing intensity. We then developed a conceptual model of intensity of mangrove fishing using those factors identified both as being important and for which appropriate global data could be found or developed. These factors were non-urban population, distance to market, distance to mangroves and other fishing grounds, and storm events. By projecting this conceptual model using geospatial datasets, we were able to estimate the number and distribution of mangrove associated fishers and the intensity of fishing in mangroves. We estimate there are 4.1 million mangrove associated fishers globally, with the highest number of mangrove fishers found in Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Brazil. Mangrove fishing intensity was greatest throughout Asia, and to a lesser extent West and Central Africa, and Central and South America.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2021
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-450316 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2020.107159 (DOI)000620148000002 ()
Available from: 2021-08-20 Created: 2021-08-20 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
van den Heuvel, L., Blicharska, M., Blyth, S. & Rönnbäck, P. (2020). Catch reporting in recreational fishing: Swedish anglers’ attitudes andpreferences, and the effect of social factors. Fisheries Research, 223, Article ID 105444.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catch reporting in recreational fishing: Swedish anglers’ attitudes andpreferences, and the effect of social factors
2020 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 223, article id 105444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recreational fishing activities have the potential to negatively affect fish populations worldwide, but data about fishing pressure is lacking in many countries. The Swedish government anticipates tackling this problem by implementing a national catch reporting program. Through an online survey among members of the Swedish Anglers Association (±60.000 members), this study gathers the attitudes and preferences of Swedish anglers (n=910) through a variety of statements relating to the potential introduction of a catch reporting program and investigates the effects of different social factors (consumptive orientation, motivations to fish, centrality to life and environmental attitude) on these attitudes and preferences. The results reveal that support for a potential catch reporting program was high for most anglers. Significant positive relationships were found between support for a catch reporting program and the sense of responsibility towards conservation issues, the desire to catch big fish and experiencing the environment as a motivation to fish. On the other hand, the desire to keep fish and catch large numbers of fish had a significant negative relationship with catch reporting support. Support for a mandatory catch reporting program increased with age, education level, income and years of fishing experience. Despite the generally positive attitude towards a potential catch reporting program, consumptive orientation, motivations to fish, environmental attitude and demographic characteristics were proven to play an important role in the anglers’ preferences towards catch reporting, and should not be overlooked when designing such a program. Our study shows that investigation of the social composition of an angler population is vital to obtain a better understanding of the diversity of attitudes and preferences towards recreational fisheries management, which can in turn facilitate implementation of management measures, such as catch reporting programs. Since this study focused only on members of the national angling association, who are likely more avid than non-members, additional research is needed to obtain results that are more representative of the total Swedish angler population.

Keywords
Recreational angling, Human dimension, Consumptive orientation, Environmental attitude, Collaborative monitoring
National Category
Fish and Wildlife Management
Research subject
Natural Resources and Sustainable Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406082 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2019.105444 (DOI)000509622800012 ()
Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
zu Ermgassen, P. S. E., Mukherjee, N., Worthington, T. A., Acosta, A., da Rocha Araujo, A. R., Beitl, C. M., . . . Spalding, M. (2020). Fishers who rely on mangroves: Modelling and mapping the global intensity of mangrove-associated fisheries. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 247, Article ID 106975.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fishers who rely on mangroves: Modelling and mapping the global intensity of mangrove-associated fisheries
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2020 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 247, article id 106975Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mangroves are critical nursery habitats for fish and invertebrates, providing livelihoods for many coastal communities. Despite their importance, there is currently no estimate of the number of fishers engaged in mangrove associated fisheries, nor of the fishing intensity associated with mangroves at a global scale. We address these gaps by developing a global model of mangrove associated fisher numbers and mangrove fishing intensity. To develop the model, we undertook a three-round Delphi process with mangrove fisheries experts to identify the key drivers of mangrove fishing intensity. We then developed a conceptual model of intensity of mangrove fishing using those factors identified both as being important and for which appropriate global data could be found or developed. These factors were non-urban population, distance to market, distance to mangroves and other fishing grounds, and storm events. By projecting this conceptual model using geospatial data sets, we were able to estimate the number and distribution of mangrove associated fishers and the intensity of fishing in mangroves. We estimate there are 4.1 million mangrove associated fishers globally, with the highest number of mangrove fishers found in Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Brazil. Mangrove fishing intensity was greatest throughout Asia, and to a lesser extent West and Central Africa, and Central and South America.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2020
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-432284 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2020.106975 (DOI)000599685400006 ()
Available from: 2021-01-22 Created: 2021-01-22 Last updated: 2021-01-22Bibliographically approved
Blicharska, M., Smithers, R. J., Mikusinski, G., Rönnbäck, P., Harrison, P. A., Nilsson, M. & Sutherland, W. J. (2019). Biodiversity’s contributions to sustainable development. Nature Sustainability, 2, 1083-1093
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biodiversity’s contributions to sustainable development
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2019 (English)In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, p. 1083-1093Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International concern to develop sustainably challenges us to act upon the inherent links between our economy, society and environment, and is leading to increasing acknowledgement of biodiversity's importance. This Review discusses the breadth of ways in which biodiversity can support sustainable development. It uses the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a basis for exploring scientific evidence of the benefits delivered by biodiversity. It focuses on papers that provide examples of how biodiversity components (that is, ecosystems, species and genes) directly deliver benefits that may contribute to the achievement of individual SDGs. It also considers how biodiversity's direct contributions to fulfilling some SDGs may indirectly support the achievement of other SDGs to which biodiversity does not contribute directly. How the attributes (for example, diversity, abundance or composition) of biodiversity components influence the benefits delivered is also presented, where described by the papers reviewed. While acknowledging potential negative impacts and trade-offs between different benefits, the study concludes that biodiversity may contribute to fulfilment of all SDGs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401521 (URN)10.1038/s41893-019-0417-9 (DOI)000502144200006 ()
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
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