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Thulin, Carl-Gustaf
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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Thulin, C.-G., Malmsten, J. & Laurila, A. (2012). Differences in body mass, health status and genetic variation between insular and mainland brown hares (Lepus europaeus) in Sweden. European Journal of Wildlife Research, 58(6), 897-907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in body mass, health status and genetic variation between insular and mainland brown hares (Lepus europaeus) in Sweden
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 897-907Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduced populations can be affected by random processes such as genetic drift, deterministic processes given by the local environmental conditions and anthropogenic factors such as hunting and management. Geographically constrained populations are particularly exposed to these processes, and altogether, these factors may result in rapid differentiation from the ancestral populations. The introduced European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) population on the island Ven is isolated from the Swedish and Danish mainland. Undocumented observations suggest that the hares on the island have been increasingly diseased in recent years and also decreased in body size. To test the substance of these observations, as well as the potential for inbreeding depression in this geographically constrained population, a total of 321 hares from Ven and three reference populations on the Swedish mainland were analysed with respect to body mass, general health status and genetic variation. The results confirm that the hares on Ven have lower body mass than hares on the mainland, but there are no indications of health deficits. We argue that the difference in body mass primarily is an island effect of stress and/or nutritional shortage, possibly induced by high population density, anthropogenic selection regimes and absence of mammalian meso-predators. Further, the genetic data indicate that the insular population is substructured, and subadults from these two subpopulations differ in body mass. This apparent substructuring could be due to chance effects, but may also be related to assortative mating or presence of sustained populations with different ancestry.

Keyword
Body mass, Pathogen, Disease, Microsatellite, Island, Structure
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-189128 (URN)10.1007/s10344-012-0633-3 (DOI)000311498000002 ()
Available from: 2013-01-04 Created: 2012-12-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Thulin, C.-G., Englund, L., Ericsson, G. & Spong, G. (2011). The impact of founder events and introductions on genetic variation in the muskox Ovibos moschatus in Sweden. Acta Theriologica, 56(4), 305-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of founder events and introductions on genetic variation in the muskox Ovibos moschatus in Sweden
2011 (English)In: Acta Theriologica, ISSN 0001-7051, E-ISSN 2190-3743, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 305-314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The muskox Ovibos moschatus (Zimmerman 1780) is a specialised arctic mammal with a highly fragmented circumpolar distribution, with native populations in Canada and east Greenland and introduced populations in west Greenland, Alaska, Siberia and Eurasia. In 1971, five O. moschatus individuals from an introduced population in Norway migrated to Sweden. After a peak population of 36 individuals in the mid-1980s, the Swedish population now numbers seven individuals, making it vulnerable to both demographic and genetic stochasticity (i.e. inbreeding). Here, we analyse genetic variation among native and introduced populations of O. moschatus to evaluate the genetic effect of sequential founder events in this species. Our results show that genetic variation among native and introduced O. moschatus populations do not conform entirely to the expectations from sequential founder events, most likely because of random processes associated with introduction. In the Swedish population, a calf resulting from the mating of a wild cow and a captive Greenlandic bull contributes significantly to the current genetic variation. Thus, even a single outbreeding event may, at least momentarily, increase the genetic variation and potentially prevent inbreeding depression. Our results should aid the long-term preservation of O. moschatus in Sweden and Europe.

Keyword
Supplemental release, Conservation, Restoration, Microsatellites, Bottleneck, Sequential
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-168433 (URN)10.1007/s13364-011-0035-z (DOI)000299035400002 ()
Available from: 2012-02-10 Created: 2012-02-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Jansson, G., Thulin, C.-G. & Pehrson, Å. (2007). Factors related to the occurrence of hybrids between brown hares Lepus europaeus and mountain hares L. timidus in Sweden. Ecography, 30(5), 709-715
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors related to the occurrence of hybrids between brown hares Lepus europaeus and mountain hares L. timidus in Sweden
2007 (English)In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 709-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hybridization occurs among many species, and may have implications for conservation as well as for evolution. Interspecific gene flow between brown hares Lepus europaeus and mountain hares L. timidus has been documented in Sweden and in continental Europe, and has probably to some extent occurred throughout history in sympatric areas. What local factors or ecological relationships that correlate with or trigger hybridization between these species has however been unclear. We studied spatial distribution of hybrids between brown hares and mountain hares in Sweden in relation to characteristics of the sampled localities (hunting grounds). In a sample of 70 brown hares collected from 39 populations in south-central Sweden during 2003–2005, 11 (16%) showed introgressed mtDNA from mountain hares. Among the brown hares from their northern range, i.e. in general the most recent establishments, the corresponding figure was 75% (9/12). The frequency of samples with hybrid ancestry increased significantly with latitude, altitude and hilliness, and were higher (p<0.1) in recently established populations and/or where the proportion of arable land was low. Several site-specific parameters were correlated, e.g. latitude as expected to hilliness, and no parameter explained the occurrence of hybrids exclusively. Instead, the appearance of mountain hare mtDNA among brown hares was associated with a conglomerate of parameters reflecting landscapes atypical for the brown hare, e.g. forest dominated and steep areas where the species quite recently was established. We suggest that these abiotic factors mirror the main aspect influencing hybridization frequency, namely the density or relative frequency of the two species. In atypical brown hare landscapes with recent establishment, mountain hares are probably relatively more common. When one species dominate in numbers, or when both species display low densities, increased frequency of hybridization is expected due to low availability of conspecific partners, a phenomenon referred to as Hubbs' principle.

Keyword
Vertebrata, Mammalia, Lagomorpha, Europe, Lepus timidus, Lepus europaeus, Geographic distribution, Population density, Environmental factor, Sympatry, Interspecific hybridization, Hybrid, Sweden, Spatial distribution
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-14748 (URN)10.1111/j.2007.0906-7590.05162.x (DOI)000250728200009 ()
Available from: 2008-01-31 Created: 2008-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Thulin, C.-G., Simberloff, D., Barun, A., McCracken, G., Pascal, M. & Islam, M. (2006). Genetic divergence in the small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus), a widely distributed invasive species. Molecular Ecology, 15(13), 3947-3956
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic divergence in the small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus), a widely distributed invasive species
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2006 (English)In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 15, no 13, p. 3947-3956Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The combination of founder events, random drift and new selective forces experienced by introduced species typically lowers genetic variation and induces differentiation from the ancestral population. Here, we investigate microsatellite differentiation between introduced and native populations of the small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus). Many expectations based on introduction history, such as loss of alleles and relationships among populations, are confirmed. Nevertheless, when applying population assignment methods to our data, we observe a few specimens that are incorrectly assigned and/or appear to have a mixed ancestry, despite estimates of substantial population differentiation. Thus, we suggest that population assignments of individuals should be viewed as tentative and that there should be agreement among different algorithms before assignments are applied in conservation or management. Further, we find no congruence between previously reported morphological differentiation and the sorting of microsatellite variation. Some introduced populations have retained much genetic variation while others have not, irrespective of morphology. Finally, we find alleles from the sympatric grey mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii) in one small Indian mongoose within the native range, suggesting an alternative explanation for morphological differentiation involving a shift in female preferences in allopatry.

Keyword
differentiation, founder, Herpestes, introduced species, microsatellite, mongoose
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23177 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03084.x (DOI)000241388800007 ()17054495 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Thulin, C. G. (2006). Hur gör harar i andra länder?. Svensk Jakt, 10, 80-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur gör harar i andra länder?
2006 (Swedish)In: Svensk Jakt, Vol. 10, p. 80-81Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.)) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23182 (URN)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Thulin, C. G. (2006). Microsatellite investigation of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Scandinavia reveals genetic differentiation of a Baltic Sea Island population.. European Journal of Wildlife Research, 52, 228-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microsatellite investigation of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Scandinavia reveals genetic differentiation of a Baltic Sea Island population.
2006 (English)In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, Vol. 52, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23179 (URN)doi:10.1007/s10344-006-0047-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Thulin, C. G. (2006). Släktskap mellan rådjur. Svensk Jakt, 9, 98-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Släktskap mellan rådjur
2006 (Swedish)In: Svensk Jakt, Vol. 9, p. 98-100Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.)) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23184 (URN)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Thulin, C. G., Stone, J., Tegelström, H. & Walker, C. (2006). Species assignment and hybrid identification among Scandinavian hares Lepus europaeus and L. timidus.. Wildlife Biology, 12, 29-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Species assignment and hybrid identification among Scandinavian hares Lepus europaeus and L. timidus.
2006 (English)In: Wildlife Biology, Vol. 12, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23169 (URN)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Jansson, G., Persson, Å. & Thulin, C. G. (2006). Var och när uppkommer hybridharar. Svensk Jakt, 10, 76-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Var och när uppkommer hybridharar
2006 (Swedish)In: Svensk Jakt, Vol. 10, p. 76-78Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.)) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-23183 (URN)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
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