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Sjögren, Per
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Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
van Egmond, L., Tan, X., Sjögren, P., Cederholm, T. & Benedict, C. (2019). Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study. Nutrients, 11(5), Article ID 1029.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between Healthy Dietary Patterns and Self-Reported Sleep Disturbances in Older Men: The ULSAM Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 1029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, little is known about how dietary patterns may link to measures of sleep quality in older subjects, who often suffer from sleep problems. Here, we investigated, in an older male population from Sweden (n = 970; aged 71 +/- 1 year), whether adherence to the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI; based on recommendations from the World Health Organization) or the Mediterranean Diet (MD) is linked to sleep disturbances. The diet scores were calculated using a seven-day food diary, and self-reported sleep initiation or maintenance problems were assessed by questionnaires. When adjusted for potential confounders, no associations between dietary scores and sleep parameters were found. In contrast, low consumption of milk and dairy products one of the dietary features of the MD was associated with better subjective sleep initiation. This association was, however, not found in men with adequate reports of daily energy intake (similar to 54% of the cohort). To summarize, our findings do not suggest that older men can mitigate perceived difficulties to fall and stay asleep by adhering to either the HDI or MD. Whether low consumption of milk and dairy products can facilitate sleep initiation must be confirmed in future studies by utilizing objective measures of sleep such as polysomnography. Finally, when investigating associations between dietary patterns and sleep, particular attention should be paid to the potential confounder of inadequate reporting of energy intake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
mediterranean diet, healthy diet indicator, sleep problems, elderly population, dietary adherence
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389873 (URN)10.3390/nu11051029 (DOI)000471021600089 ()31071943 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
Available from: 2019-07-31 Created: 2019-07-31 Last updated: 2019-07-31Bibliographically approved
Laguzzi, F., Risérus, U., Marklund, M., Vikström, M., Sjögren, P., Gigante, B., . . . Leander, K. (2018). Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women. Clinical Nutrition, 37(6, Part A), 2001-2010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 6, Part A, p. 2001-2010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background & aims: Alcohol consumption is considered to affect circulating fatty acids (FAs) but knowledge about specific associations is limited. We aimed to assess the relation between alcohol consumption and serum FAs in 60-year-old Swedish men and women.

Methods: In a random sample of 1917 men and 2058 women residing in Stockholm county, cross-sectional associations between different categories of alcohol consumption and FAs were assessed using linear regression; beta(1) coefficients with 95% confidence interval (Cl) were calculated. Self-reported alcohol consumption was categorized as none, low (<= 9.9 g/day) (reference), moderate (10-29.9 g/day) and high (>= 30 g/day). Moderate alcohol consumption was further subdivided into consumption of beer, wine, liquor and their combinations. Thirteen serum cholesterol ester FM were measured by gas chromatography and individual FM were expressed as percentage of total FAs.

Results: Increasing alcohol consumption was associated to linear increase of saturated myristic acid, monounsaturated FAs and n-6 polyunsaturated (PUFA) arachidonic acid, whereas linear decrease was noted for saturated pentadecanoic acid and for n-6 PUFA linoleic acid. With non-linear associations, increasing alcohol consumption also associated to decreased saturated stearic acid, n-6 PUFA dihomogamma-linolenic acid, and n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid and increased saturated palmitic acid, n-6 PUFA gamma-linolenic acid and n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid. Among types of beverages, wine consumption was associated with n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (beta(1) 0.59; 95% CI: 030;0.88) and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30;0.78), and docosahexaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.06; 95% CI: 0.00;0.12).

Conclusions: These findings may give important basis for further investigations to better understand biological mechanisms behind the dose-dependent associations between alcohol consumption and health outcomes observed in many previous studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2018
Keywords
Ethanol, Alcohol drinking, Alcoholic beverages, Wine, Beer, Fatty acids
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375579 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.09.007 (DOI)000455069400023 ()29032841 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 52120133894Swedish Research Council, 09533Stockholm County Council, 20150163Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150581
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Zhou, A., Taylor, A. E., Karhunen, V., Zhan, Y., Rovio, S. P., Lahti, J., . . . Hypponen, E. (2018). Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 7526.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coffee's long-term effect on cognitive function remains unclear with studies suggesting both benefits and adverse effects. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate the causal relationship between habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function in mid-to later life. This included up to 415,530 participants and 300,760 coffee drinkers from 10 meta-analysed European ancestry cohorts. In each cohort, composite cognitive scores that capture global cognition and memory were computed using available tests. A genetic score derived using CYP1A1/2 (rs2472297) and AHR (rs6968865) was chosen as a proxy for habitual coffee consumption. Null associations were observed when examining the associations of the genetic score with global and memory cognition (beta = -0.0007, 95% C.I. -0.009 to 0.008, P = 0.87; beta = -0.001, 95% C.I. -0.005 to 0.002, P = 0.51, respectively), with high consistency between studies (P-heterogeneity > 0.4 for both). Domain specific analyses using available cognitive measures in the UK Biobank also did not support effects by habitual coffee intake for reaction time, pairs matching, reasoning or prospective memory (P >= 0.05 for all). Despite the power to detect very small effects, our meta-analysis provided no evidence for causal long-term effects of habitual coffee consumption on global cognition or memory.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356867 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25919-2 (DOI)000431958000003 ()29760501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Yuan, X., Kronstrom, M., Hellenius, M.-L., Cederholm, T., Xu, D. & Sjögren, P. (2018). Longitudinal changes in leukocyte telomere length and mortality in elderly Swedish men. Aging, 10(10), 3005-3016
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal changes in leukocyte telomere length and mortality in elderly Swedish men
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2018 (English)In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 3005-3016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Telomere length (TL) is considered an indicator of aging and age-related diseases, but longitudinal studies on TL changes and mortality are few. We therefore analyzed TL and longitudinal changes in TL in relation to all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in 247 elderly Swedish men. TL was determined by the qPCR method at ages 71 and 81 and subsequent mortality cases were identified from the Swedish cause-of-death registry. Cox proportional hazard ratios were calculated during a mean follow-up of 7.4 years, during which 178 deaths occurred. Short telomeres at baseline was strongly associated with mortality risks, with a 40 to 70% increased risk of all-cause mortality, and a 2-fold increased risk of cancer mortality. Longitudinal changes in TL revealed shortening in 83% of individuals, whilst 10% extended their telomeres. TL attrition did not predict all-cause or cancer mortality, but we found a 60% decreased risk for cardiovascular mortality in those who shortened their telomeres. Our data show an increased risk of mortality in individuals with short baseline telomeres, but no relations to all-cause, and cancer mortality for changes in TL. Intriguingly, our data indicate lower risk of cardiovascular mortality with shortening of telomeres. The latter should be interpreted cautiously.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IMPACT JOURNALS LLC, 2018
Keywords
telomere length, longitudinal changes, mortality, cause-specific mortality, cohort study
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372677 (URN)10.18632/aging.101611 (DOI)000451851600041 ()30375983 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietyThe Cancer Society in Stockholm
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Olsson, E., Becker, W., Karlström, B., Cederholm, T. & Sjögren, P. (2017). Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men. Experimental Gerontology, 92, 52-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men
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2017 (English)In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 92, p. 52-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The accuracy of predictive equations for calculating resting energy expenditure (REE) in elderly people has been questioned. Aging is associated with progressive declines in REE, which partly is explained by loss of fat free mass (FFM). Against this background we aimed to identify the most accurate predictive equation for REE in octogenarian men, taking body composition into account and using indirect calorimetry as reference value. REE was measured in 22 men (mean age 82.6 +/- 0.3 years) and compared with six predictive equations: two based on FFM and four based on body weight, height and/or age. FFM was derived from Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analyses. Spearman's rank correlations showed a moderate to high positive monotonic correlation (r = 0.62 to 0.79) between measured and calculated REE (all p < 0.005).The mean calculated REE was significantly different from measured REE for all equations except Mifflin-St Jeor. A calculated REE within 10% of measured REE was considered acceptable and the equations of Mifflin-St Jeor, WHO and Harris-Benedict captured 64%, 50% and 45% of the participant, respectively. The Mifflin-St Jeor equation had the lowest root mean square error (138 kcal), followed by the equation by Harris-Benedict (189 kcal) and WHO (220 kcal). The equations from Luhrmann, Henry and Cunningham predicted REE rather poorly in our study subjects, with e.g. <40% of the individuals within 10% of measured REE. Our results indicate that the Mifflin-St Jeor equation (using FFM) is the most accurate equation estimating REE in these octogenarian men. Harris-Benedict or WHO equations are potential alternatives if information on FFM is unavailable, although their accuracy on an individual level is limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323020 (URN)10.1016/j.exger.2017.03.013 (DOI)000400530400009 ()28323025 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2010-70X-2141401-3, 2011-2427
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Franzon, K., Byberg, L., Sjögren, P., Zethelius, B., Cederholm, T. & Kilander, L. (2017). Predictors of Independent Aging and Survival: A 16-Year Follow-Up Report in Octogenarian Men. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 65(9), 1953-1960
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of Independent Aging and Survival: A 16-Year Follow-Up Report in Octogenarian Men
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2017 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 1953-1960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine the longitudinal associations between aging with preserved functionality, i.e. independent aging and survival, and lifestyle variables, dietary pattern and cardiovascular risk factors.

DESIGN: Cohort study.

SETTING: Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Swedish men (n = 1,104) at a mean age of 71 (range 69.4-74.1) were investigated, 369 of whom were evaluated for independent aging 16 years later, at a mean age of 87 (range 84.8-88.9).

MEASUREMENTS: A questionnaire was used to obtain information on lifestyle, including education, living conditions, and physical activity. Adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet was assessed according to a modified Mediterranean Diet Score derived from 7-day food records. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured. Independent aging at a mean age of 87 was defined as lack of diagnosed dementia, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or greater, not institutionalized, independence in personal activities of daily living, and ability to walk outdoors alone. Complete survival data at age 85 were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register.

RESULTS: Fifty-seven percent of the men survived to age 85, and 75% of the participants at a mean age of 87 displayed independent aging. Independent aging was associated with never smoking (vs current) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-4.60) and high (vs low) adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.14-6.80). Normal weight or overweight and waist circumference of 102 cm or less were also associated with independent aging. Similar associations were observed with survival.

CONCLUSION: Lifestyle factors such as never smoking, maintaining a healthy diet, and not being obese at age 71 were associated with survival and independent aging at age 85 and older in men.

Keywords
Mediterranean diet, healthy aging, longitudinal, obesity, smoking
National Category
Geriatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334423 (URN)10.1111/jgs.14971 (DOI)000411060500016 ()28685810 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Byberg, L., Olsson, E., Karlström, B., Cederholm, T., Melhus, H., Sjögren, P. & Kilander, L. (2017). Reply to WB Grant [Letter to the editor]. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(2), 700-701
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reply to WB Grant
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 700-701Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334418 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.117.160168 (DOI)000406672300035 ()28765386 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Byberg, L., Olsson, E., Karlström, B., Cederholm, T., Melhus, H., Sjögren, P. & Kilander, L. (2017). Reply to Y Mao and H Yu. [Letter to the editor]. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(2), 698-699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reply to Y Mao and H Yu.
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 698-699Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334420 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.117.156752 (DOI)000406672300033 ()28765384 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Alsharari, Z., Risérus, U., Leander, K., Sjögren, P., Carlsson, A. C., Vikstrom, M., . . . Marklund, M. (2017). Serum Fatty Acids, Desaturase Activities and Abdominal Obesity - A Population-Based Study of 60-Year Old Men and Women. PLoS ONE, 12(1), Article ID e0170684.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum Fatty Acids, Desaturase Activities and Abdominal Obesity - A Population-Based Study of 60-Year Old Men and Women
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2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e0170684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abdominal obesity is a key contributor of metabolic disease. Recent trials suggest that dietary fat quality affects abdominal fat content, where palmitic acid and linoleic acid influence abdominal obesity differently, while effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are less studied. Also, fatty acid desaturation may be altered in abdominal obesity. We aimed to investigate cross-sectional associations of serum fatty acids and desaturases with abdominal obesity prevalence in a population-based cohort study. Serum cholesteryl ester fatty acids composition was measured by gas chromatography in 60-year old men (n = 1883) and women (n = 2015). Cross-sectional associations of fatty acids with abdominal obesity prevalence and anthropometric measures (e.g., sagittal abdominal diameter) were evaluated in multivariable-adjusted logistic and linear regression models, respectively. Similar models were employed to investigate relations between desaturase activities (estimated by fatty acid ratios) and abdominal obesity. In logistic regression analyses, palmitic acid, stearoyl-CoA- desaturase and Delta 6-desaturase indices were associated with abdominal obesity; multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for highest versus lowest quartiles were 1.45 (1.19-1.76), 4.06 (3.27-5.05), and 3.07 (2.51-3.75), respectively. Linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, docohexaenoic acid, and Delta 5-desaturase were inversely associated with abdominal obesity; multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 0.39 (0.32-0.48), 0.74 (0.61-0.89), 0.76 (0.62-0.93), and 0.40 (0.33-0.49), respectively. Eicosapentaenoic acid was not associated with abdominal obesity. Similar results were obtained from linear regression models evaluating associations with different anthropometric measures. Sex-specific and linear associations were mainly observed for n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, while associations of the other exposures were generally non-linear and similar across sexes. In accordance with findings from short-term trials, abdominal obesity was more common among individuals with relatively high proportions of palmitic acid, whilst the contrary was true for linoleic acid. Further trials should examine the potential role of linoleic acid and its main dietary source, vegetable oils, in abdominal obesity prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2017
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319131 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0170684 (DOI)000396176100074 ()28125662 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Marklund, M., Leander, K., Vikstrom, M., Laguzzi, F., Gigante, B., Sjögren, P., . . . Risérus, U. (2017). Serum Pentadecanoic Acid, A Biomarker Of Dairy Fat Intake, Is Associated With Lower Risk Of Incident Cardiovascular Disease And All-Cause Mortality In Swedish Men And Women. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 71, 322-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum Pentadecanoic Acid, A Biomarker Of Dairy Fat Intake, Is Associated With Lower Risk Of Incident Cardiovascular Disease And All-Cause Mortality In Swedish Men And Women
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2017 (English)In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 71, p. 322-323Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KARGER, 2017
Keywords
Dairy fat, biomarker, fatty acid, cardiovascular disease, mortality
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345586 (URN)000415605300576 ()
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
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