uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Markström, Agneta
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Danielsson, K., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Jan-Erik, B. & Markström, A. (2018). Light therapy with scheduled rise times in young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder: Therapeutic outcomes and possible predictors. Behavioural Sleep Medicine, 16(4), 325-336
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Light therapy with scheduled rise times in young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder: Therapeutic outcomes and possible predictors
2018 (English)In: Behavioural Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1540-2002, E-ISSN 1540-2010, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 325-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical trials with light therapy (LT) for delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) are sparse and little is known about factors that are favorable for improvements. In this study, LT with scheduled rise times was conducted at home for 14 days by 44 participants with DSPD aged 16–26 years. Primary outcomes were sleep onset and sleep offset. Potential predictors were demographic characteristics, chronotype, dim light melatonin onset, the number of days the LT lamp was used, the daily duration of LT, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, depression, worry, and rumination. Significant advances were observed in sleep onset and sleep offset from baseline to the end of treatment. The number of days of LT predicted earlier sleep onset and sleep offset.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298760 (URN)10.1080/15402002.2016.1210150 (DOI)000431524200002 ()27712107 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-07 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms. European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 16, 15-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia.

Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups.

Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment.

Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

Keywords
Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Hypnotic consumption, Anxiety Insomnia Depression
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319923 (URN)10.1016/j.eujim.2017.10.002 (DOI)000417392500003 ()
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Ring, I. J., Nevéus, T., Markström, A., Arnrup, K. & Bazargani, F. (2017). Nocturnal enuresis impaired children's quality of life and friendships. Acta Paediatrica, 106(5), 806-811
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nocturnal enuresis impaired children's quality of life and friendships
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 5, p. 806-811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThere have not been any continence-specific measurement tools in Swedish that have allowed clinicians to investigate the quality of life (QoL) in children with bladder dysfunction. This study evaluated the QoL in Swedish children with nocturnal enuresis and tested the reliability of a Swedish translation of the Paediatric Incontinence Questionnaire (PinQ). MethodsThis prospective study comprised 46 children aged six to 18 years with nocturnal enuresis, who completed the PinQ after it was translated into Swedish. It was completed twice by 33 patients, and these responses were included in the test-retest evaluation. ResultsThe self-reported mean sum score for the whole group was 26.3 13.37 (range: 5-58), and the most affected domains were social relations with peers and self-esteem. The highest individual scores were four, three or two for 71.7%, 17.4% and 10.9% of the study population, respectively. Cronbach's alpha was 0.87 for the whole questionnaire, indicating good internal consistency. The test-retest stability was excellent, with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.76. ConclusionChildren with nocturnal enuresis had impaired self-esteem, and their impaired QoL affected their relationships with friends. The Swedish version of the PinQ proved to be a reliable tool that will be used in further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
Nocturnal enuresis, Quality of life, Questionnaire, Self-esteem, Urinary incontinence
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321783 (URN)10.1111/apa.13787 (DOI)000398859300021 ()28199734 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Ring, I. J., Markström, A., Bazargani, F. & Nevéus, T. (2017). Sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children and controls. Journal of Pediatric Urology, 13(6), 620.e1-620.e6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children and controls
2017 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 620.e1-620.e6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis and sleep disordered breathing are common childhood problems that are reported to be associated with each other. Sleep disordered breathing is often found in children with upper airway obstruction and, according to some studies, its presence is associated with an increased risk of nocturnal enuresis. Respiration during sleep in children with therapy-resistant enuresis, but no history of snoring or sleep apneas, has previously been investigated, and subclinical signs of disordered respiration were found in this group. However, sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children without a history of snoring or sleep apneas has not been thoroughly studied before.

Aim: To evaluate sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children and compare them with healthy control children.

Subjects and methods: Children aged 8-13 years with nocturnal enuresis were included. Exclusion criteria were: daytime incontinence, on-going anti-enuretic treatment, and concomitant urological, endocrinological, nephrological or psychiatric disorders. Twenty children (19 boys and 1 girl) suffering from therapy-resistant nocturnal enuresis, and 21 healthy controls (18 boys and 3 girls) underwent one night of polygraphic sleep registration focused on respiratory variables. The registration included electroencephalography as well as assessment of respiratory movements, nasal airflow and oxygen saturation; it was performed with a portable sleep device at the subjects' homes. In addition to this, OSA 18, a health-related quality of life instrument, was used to evaluate subjective issues related to sleep and breathing.

Results: The mean apnea hypopnea index values were 0.96 +/- 0.8 for the patient group and 0.46 +/- 0.4 for the control group. The oxygen desaturation index was slightly higher for the children with nocturnal enuresis compared with the healthy controls (P = 0.05). No other differences were found in the respiratory variables. Both groups of children showed low levels of arousals (Summary Table). The enuretic children reported significantly more subjective sleep disturbances and a lower quality of life than their healthy peers.

Discussion: This was the first controlled study of sleep disordered breathing in children with nocturnal enuresis. One limitation of the study was that some variables were known to be underestimated when scoring polygraphic data. The apnea hypopnea index was such a variable and was indeed lower than in a previous study.

Conclusion: No major differences in respiration during sleep were found between enuretic children and controls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
Keywords
Nocturnal enuresis, Sleep disordered breathing, Respiratory polygraphy, Children
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340287 (URN)10.1016/j.jpurol.2017.05.012 (DOI)000418045800024 ()
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 28, 220-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, p. 220-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

Keywords
Actigraphy, Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Insomnia disorder, Non-pharmacological, Treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320044 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.06.006 (DOI)000407722900030 ()28779933 (PubMedID)
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 213-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 213-213Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309494 (URN)000383445201008 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Broman, J.-E., Danielsson, K. & Markström, A. (2016). A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 346-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 346-346Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309506 (URN)000383445201429 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 214-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 214-214Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309495 (URN)000383445201011 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study. Sleep Disorders, 2016, Article ID 7057282.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, Vol. 2016, article id 7057282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i). However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4), with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2016
Keywords
non-pharmacological, sleep disorder, treatment, auricular acupuncture, cognitive-behavioural therapy, insomnia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292961 (URN)10.1155/2016/7057282 (DOI)
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Broman, J.-E. & Agneta, M. (2016). Cognitive behavioral therapy as an adjunct treatment to light therapy for delayed sleep phase disorder in young adults.: A randomized controlled feasibility study. Behavioural Sleep Medicine, 14(2), 212-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioral therapy as an adjunct treatment to light therapy for delayed sleep phase disorder in young adults.: A randomized controlled feasibility study
2016 (English)In: Behavioural Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1540-2002, E-ISSN 1540-2010, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 212-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is common among young people, but there is still no evidence-based treatment available. In the present study, the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was evaluated as an additive treatment to light therapy (LT) in DSPD. A randomized controlled trial with participants aged 16 to 26 years received LT for two weeks followed by either four weeks of CBT or no treatment (NT). LT advanced sleep-wake rhythm in both groups. Comparing LT+CBT with LT+NT, no significant group differences were observed in the primary endpoints. Although anxiety and depression scores were low at pretreatment, they decreased significantly more in LT+CBT compared to LT+NT. The results are discussed and some suggestions are given for further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233847 (URN)10.1080/15402002.2014.981817 (DOI)000371594800008 ()
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications