uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Markström, Agneta
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms. European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 16, 15-21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, 15-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia. Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups. Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment. Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

Keyword
Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Hypnotic consumption, Anxiety Insomnia Depression
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319923 (URN)10.1016/j.eujim.2017.10.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Ring, I. J., Nevéus, T., Markström, A., Arnrup, K. & Bazargani, F. (2017). Nocturnal enuresis impaired children's quality of life and friendships. Acta Paediatrica, 106(5), 806-811.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nocturnal enuresis impaired children's quality of life and friendships
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 5, 806-811 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThere have not been any continence-specific measurement tools in Swedish that have allowed clinicians to investigate the quality of life (QoL) in children with bladder dysfunction. This study evaluated the QoL in Swedish children with nocturnal enuresis and tested the reliability of a Swedish translation of the Paediatric Incontinence Questionnaire (PinQ). MethodsThis prospective study comprised 46 children aged six to 18 years with nocturnal enuresis, who completed the PinQ after it was translated into Swedish. It was completed twice by 33 patients, and these responses were included in the test-retest evaluation. ResultsThe self-reported mean sum score for the whole group was 26.3 13.37 (range: 5-58), and the most affected domains were social relations with peers and self-esteem. The highest individual scores were four, three or two for 71.7%, 17.4% and 10.9% of the study population, respectively. Cronbach's alpha was 0.87 for the whole questionnaire, indicating good internal consistency. The test-retest stability was excellent, with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.76. ConclusionChildren with nocturnal enuresis had impaired self-esteem, and their impaired QoL affected their relationships with friends. The Swedish version of the PinQ proved to be a reliable tool that will be used in further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keyword
Nocturnal enuresis, Quality of life, Questionnaire, Self-esteem, Urinary incontinence
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321783 (URN)10.1111/apa.13787 (DOI)000398859300021 ()28199734 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 28, 220-226.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, 220-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

Keyword
Actigraphy, Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Insomnia disorder, Non-pharmacological, Treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320044 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.06.006 (DOI)000407722900030 ()28779933 (PubMedID)
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 213-213.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 213-213 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309494 (URN)000383445201008 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Broman, J.-E., Danielsson, K. & Markström, A. (2016). A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 346-346.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 346-346 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309506 (URN)000383445201429 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 214-214.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, 214-214 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309495 (URN)000383445201011 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study. Sleep Disorders, 2016, Article ID 7057282.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, Vol. 2016, 7057282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i). However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4), with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2016
Keyword
non-pharmacological, sleep disorder, treatment, auricular acupuncture, cognitive-behavioural therapy, insomnia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292961 (URN)10.1155/2016/7057282 (DOI)
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Broman, J.-E. & Agneta, M. (2016). Cognitive behavioral therapy as an adjunct treatment to light therapy for delayed sleep phase disorder in young adults.: A randomized controlled feasibility study. Behavioural Sleep Medicine, 14(2), 212-232.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioral therapy as an adjunct treatment to light therapy for delayed sleep phase disorder in young adults.: A randomized controlled feasibility study
2016 (English)In: Behavioural Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1540-2002, E-ISSN 1540-2010, Vol. 14, no 2, 212-232 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is common among young people, but there is still no evidence-based treatment available. In the present study, the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was evaluated as an additive treatment to light therapy (LT) in DSPD. A randomized controlled trial with participants aged 16 to 26 years received LT for two weeks followed by either four weeks of CBT or no treatment (NT). LT advanced sleep-wake rhythm in both groups. Comparing LT+CBT with LT+NT, no significant group differences were observed in the primary endpoints. Although anxiety and depression scores were low at pretreatment, they decreased significantly more in LT+CBT compared to LT+NT. The results are discussed and some suggestions are given for further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233847 (URN)10.1080/15402002.2014.981817 (DOI)000371594800008 ()
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, K., Markström, A., Broman, J.-E., von Knorring, L. & Jansson-Fröjmark, M. (2016). Delayed sleep phase disorder in a Swedish cohort of adolescents and young adults: Prevalence and associated factors. Chronobiology International, 33(10), 1331-1339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delayed sleep phase disorder in a Swedish cohort of adolescents and young adults: Prevalence and associated factors
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 10, 1331-1339 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A delayed sleep-wake and circadian rhythm often occurs during puberty. While some individuals only develop a delayed sleep phase (DSP), others will fulfill the criteria for the diagnosis of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). All previous studies have however not separated DSP from DSPD, and, as a result, the prevalence and associated factors are largely unknown for the two conditions individually. We estimated the prevalence of DSP and DSPD in a Swedish cohort of adolescents and young adults. We also investigated associated factors in the two conditions relative to each other and individuals with no delayed sleep phase. A questionnaire regarding sleep patterns, demographics, substance use/abuse, and symptoms of depression, anxiety, worry, and rumination was sent to 1000 randomly selected participants (16–26 years of age) in Uppsala, Sweden (response rate = 68%). DSP was defined as a late sleep onset and a preferred late wake up time. The DSPD diagnosis was further operationalized according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Edition 5 (DSM-5) criteria including insomnia or excessive sleepiness, distress or dysfunction caused by the delayed sleep phase and that the sleep problem had been evident for 3 months. DSP occurred at a frequency of 4.6% and DSPD at a frequency of 4% in the investigated cohort. DSP was more common in males and was associated with not attending educational activity or work, having shift work, nicotine and alcohol use and less rumination. DSPD was equally common in males and females and was associated with not attending educational activity or work and with elevated levels of anxiety. Both DSP and DSPD appear to be common in adolescents and young adults in this Swedish cohort. No educational activity or work was associated with both DSP and DSPD. However, there were also apparent differences between the two groups in shift work, substance use and mental health, relative to persons with no delayed sleep phase. Thus, it seems reasonable to assess DSP and DSPD as distinct entities in future studies.

Keyword
delayed sleep phase, delayed sleep phase disorder, associated factors, occupational status, shift work, substance use/abuse.
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298762 (URN)10.1080/07420528.2016.1217002 (DOI)000388746800003 ()27537980 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-28 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Danielsson, K., Markström, A. & Jan-Erik, B. (2016). Developing a cognitive behavioral therapy manual for delayed sleep wake phase disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 45(6), 518-532.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a cognitive behavioral therapy manual for delayed sleep wake phase disorder
2016 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 45, no 6, 518-532 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article reports the development of a treatment protocol, based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles, for delayed sleep–wake phase disorder (DSWPD). The protocol consists of psycho-education, presenting a CBT model for DSWPD, case formulation, motivational interviewing, registering sleep in a diary, strategies to improve the rhythm of sleep and wakefulness, relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, strategies to cope with daytime symptoms, constructing an individualized CBT program, and learning how to deal with relapses. Qualitative data, focusing on how the patients perceived the protocol, were collected within the realm of a trial exploring the efficacy of the protocol. These findings highlighted several advantages but also disadvantages of the therapy. It is our hope that this paper might act as a platform for further clinical work and future research efforts in patients with DSWPD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298761 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2016.1207096 (DOI)000389240600009 ()
Available from: 2016-07-07 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications