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Olsson, Mikael
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Saketi, S., Bexell, U., Östby, J. & Olsson, M. (2019). On the diffusion wear of cemented carbides in the turning of AISI 316L stainless steel. Wear, 430-431, 202-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the diffusion wear of cemented carbides in the turning of AISI 316L stainless steel
2019 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 430-431, p. 202-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present work has studied the wear and wear mechanisms of three different but comparable cemented carbide grades during orthogonal turning of AISI 316L. The influences of WC grain size and cuffing speed on the resulting crater and flank wear have been evaluated by optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanisms behind the crater and flank wear have been characterized on the sub-micrometer scale using high resolution SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToE-SIMS) of the worn cutting inserts and the produced chips. In addition to a dependence on cutting speeds, wear rates were also found to be dependent on the WC grain size. High resolution SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS analysis of the worn cemented carbide within the crater and flank wear regions revealed that the degradation of cemented carbide at higher cutting speeds is mainly controlled by diffusion wear of the WC-phase. This is supported by ToF-SIMS analysis of the back-side of stainless steel chips which reveals the presence of a 10 nm thin W-containing oxide film. The results are discussed and interpreted in the light of the conditions prevailing at the tool-chip interface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2019
Keywords
Cemented carbide, AISI 316L stainless steel, Turning, Diffusion wear, SEM, AES, ToF-SIMS
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390081 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2019.05.010 (DOI)000471597300021 ()
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Heinrichs, J., Olsson, M., Almqvist, B. & Jacobson, S. (2018). Initial surface failure and wear of cemented carbides in sliding contact with different rock types. Wear, 408-409, 43-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial surface failure and wear of cemented carbides in sliding contact with different rock types
2018 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 408-409, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The initial wear, deformation and degradation of cemented carbide in contact with different rock types are studied using a crossed cylinder sliding test. The sliding distance is limited to centimetres at a time, interrupted by successive SEM analysis. This allows for careful studies of the gradually changing microstructure of the cemented carbide during the test. Five different rock types are included; granite, metal sulphide ore, mica schist, quartzite and marble. All rock types are very different in microstructure, composition and properties. The cemented carbide grade used for the evaluation contains 6 wt% Co and fine (~ 1 µm) WC grains, a grade commonly used in rock drilling. The results show that the cemented carbide microstructure becomes altered already during the very first contact with rock. The initial wear rate and wear character is highly influenced by the rock type. The initial wear of the cemented carbide is highest against quartzite and lowest against marble.

National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351006 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2018.04.017 (DOI)000436482000005 ()
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150193
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Heinrichs, J., Olsson, M., Yvell, K. & Jacobson, S. (2018). On the deformation mechanisms of cemented carbide in rock drilling: Fundamental studies involving sliding contact against a rock crystal tip. International journal of refractory metals & hard materials, 77, 141-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the deformation mechanisms of cemented carbide in rock drilling: Fundamental studies involving sliding contact against a rock crystal tip
2018 (English)In: International journal of refractory metals & hard materials, ISSN 0958-0611, E-ISSN 2213-3917, Vol. 77, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cemented carbide is a composite material, most commonly consisting of tungsten carbide grains in a metallic matrix of cobalt. The combination of a hard ceramic phase in a ductile metallic matrix combines high hardness and ability to withstand plastic deformation with toughness to avoid cracking and fracturing. Since these properties are very important in rock drilling, cemented carbides are frequently used in such applications. In earlier work, it was found that granite in sliding contact with considerably harder cemented carbides not only results in plastic deformation of the cemented carbide composite, but also in plastic deformation of some of the individual WC grains. The latter observation is remarkable, since even the two hardest granite constituents (quartz and feldspar) are significantly softer than the WC grains. This tendency to plastic deformation of the WC grains was found to increase with increasing WC grain size. The present investigation aims to increase the understanding of plastic deformation of cemented carbides in general, and the individual WC grains in particular, in a situation representative for the rock drilling application. The emphasis is put on explaining the seemingly paradoxical fact that a nominally softer counter material is able to plastically deform a harder constituent in a composite material. The experimental work is based on a scratch test set-up, where a rock crystal tip slides against a fine polished cemented carbide surface under well-controlled contact conditions. The deformation and wear mechanisms of the cemented carbide are evaluated on the sub micrometer scale; using high resolution FEG-SEM, EDS, EBSD, BIB and FIB cross-sectioning. The size of the Co-pockets, together with the shape and size of WC grains, turned out to be decisive factors in determining the degree of carbide deformation. The results are discussed with respect to their industrial importance, including rock drilling.

National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363321 (URN)10.1016/j.ijrmhm.2018.04.022 (DOI)000445989200018 ()
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Saketi, S., Bexell, U., Ostby, J. & Olsson, M. (2018). Wear Behaviour of Two Different Cemented Carbide Grades in Turning 316 L Stainless Steel. In: Shabadi, R Ionescu, M Jeandin, M Richard, C Chandra, T (Ed.), THERMEC 2018: 10th International Conference on Processing and Manufacturing of Advanced Materials. Paper presented at 10th International Conference on Processing and Manufacturing of Advanced Materials Processing, Fabrication, Properties, Applications (THERMEC), JUL 09-13, 2018, Cite Sci Paris, Paris, FRANCE (pp. 2367-2372). TRANS TECH PUBLICATIONS LTD
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wear Behaviour of Two Different Cemented Carbide Grades in Turning 316 L Stainless Steel
2018 (English)In: THERMEC 2018: 10th International Conference on Processing and Manufacturing of Advanced Materials / [ed] Shabadi, R Ionescu, M Jeandin, M Richard, C Chandra, T, TRANS TECH PUBLICATIONS LTD , 2018, p. 2367-2372Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cemented carbides are the most common cutting tools for machining various grades of steels. In this study, wear behavior of two different cemented carbide grades with roughly the same fraction of binder phase and carbide phase but different grain size, in turning austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Wear tests were carried out against 316L stainless steel at 180 and 250 m/min cutting speeds. The worn surface of cutting tool is characterized using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and 3D optical profiler. The wear of cemented carbide in turning stainless steel is controlled by both chemical and mechanical wear. Plastic deformation, grain fracture and chemical wear is observed on flank and rake face of the cutting insert. In the case of fine-grained, the WC grains has higher surface contact with the adhered material which promotes higher chemical reaction and degradation of WC grains, so chemical wear resistance of the composites is larger when WC grains are larger. The hardness of cemented carbide increase linearly by decreasing grain size, therefore mechanical wear resistance of the composites is larger when WC grains are smaller.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TRANS TECH PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2018
Series
Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476 ; 941
Keywords
Cemented carbide, Turning, Stainless steel, Chemical wear, plastic deformation
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-386384 (URN)10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.941.2367 (DOI)000468152500390 ()978-3-0357-1208-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th International Conference on Processing and Manufacturing of Advanced Materials Processing, Fabrication, Properties, Applications (THERMEC), JUL 09-13, 2018, Cite Sci Paris, Paris, FRANCE
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Saketi, S. & Olsson, M. (2017). Influence of CVD and PVD coating micro topography on the initial material transfer of 316L stainless steel in sliding contacts: A laboratory study. Paper presented at 17th Nordic Symposium on Tribology (NORDTRIB), JUN 14-17, 2016, Hameenlinna, FINLAND. Wear, 388-389, 29-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of CVD and PVD coating micro topography on the initial material transfer of 316L stainless steel in sliding contacts: A laboratory study
2017 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 388-389, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Austenitic stainless steels generally display poor tribological properties in sliding contacts partly due to their strong adhesion and transfer tendency to the counter surface. As a result machining of austenitic stainless steels is frequently associated with significant problems such as high stresses and high temperatures resulting in rapid tool wear. In the present study, the influence of coating micro topography on the initial material transfer of 316L stainless steel in sliding contacts has been evaluated using a scratch testing equipment. Coating materials include modem CVD Ti(C,N)-Al2O3-TiN and PVD (TLA1)N-(AI,Cr-2)O-3 coatings deposited on cemented carbide and pre- and post-coating grinding and polishing treatments were used to obtain different micro topographies of the coating surface. Pre- and post-test characterization of the surfaces was performed using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and optical surface profilometry. The results show that the intrinsic topography of the as-deposited CVD and PVD coatings promotes material transfer. For the as-deposited CVD coating the nanoscale topography of the crystals controls the transfer while for the PVD coating the gm-scale droplets and craters control the transfer. Post-polishing of the coating, especially in combination with pre-polishing of the substrate, significantly improves the tribological performance of the surface reducing the friction coefficient and the material transfer tendency. However, the presence of gm sized droplets and craters in the PVD coating limit the possibility to obtain a smooth post-polished surface and its resistance to material pick-up. In contrast, post-polishing of the CVD coating does not suffer from intrinsic coating defects which results in low friction and a very high resistance to material pick-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2017
Keywords
Material transfer, CVD and PVD coatings, Surface topography, Stainless steel, Metal cutting
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337107 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2016.12.003 (DOI)000412614900005 ()
Conference
17th Nordic Symposium on Tribology (NORDTRIB), JUN 14-17, 2016, Hameenlinna, FINLAND
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Heinrichs, J., Olsson, M. & Jacobson, S. (2017). Initial deformation and wear of cemented carbides in rock drilling as examined by a sliding wear test. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REFRACTORY METALS & HARD MATERIALS, 64, 7-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial deformation and wear of cemented carbides in rock drilling as examined by a sliding wear test
2017 (English)In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REFRACTORY METALS & HARD MATERIALS, ISSN 0263-4368, Vol. 64, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to a combination of high hardness and toughness, resulting in excellent wear resistance, cemented carbides are commonly used as the rock crushing component in rock drilling. The present paper presents a unique study where the very initial stages of deformation and wear of cemented carbide in sliding contact with rock are followed in small incremental steps. After each step, a pre-determined area within the wear mark is characterized using high resolution SEM and EDS. This facilitates analysis of the gradual deformation, material transfer, degradation and wear. The deterioration mechanisms found in this sliding test are similar to those observed in actual rock drilling. Cemented carbide grades with different microstructures show significant differences, where a higher amount of Co and a larger WC grain size both are associated to more wear.

Keywords
Cemented carbides, Sliding, Wear, Deformation, Granite, Rock drilling
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321423 (URN)10.1016/j.ijrmhm.2016.12.011 (DOI)000397364600002 ()
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2017-05-16Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M., Yvell, K., Heinrichs, J., Bengtsson, M. & Jacobson, S. (2017). Surface degradation mechanisms of cemented carbide drill buttons in iron ore rock drilling. Paper presented at 17th Nordic Symposium on Tribology (NORDTRIB), JUN 14-17, 2016, Hameenlinna, FINLAND. Wear, 388-389, 81-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface degradation mechanisms of cemented carbide drill buttons in iron ore rock drilling
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2017 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 388-389, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The wear behavior of cemented carbide rock drill buttons is influenced by many factors, which include the composition and microstructure of the cemented carbide material, the nature of the rock material, and the conditions of the rock drilling operation. Depending on the type of rock and on the drilling procedure used, the cemented carbide is exposed to substantially differing mechanical and thermal conditions. In the present study, the surface degradation and wear mechanisms of cemented carbide drill buttons exposed to iron ore rock drilling have been characterized based on a combination of high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam cross-sectioning (FIB), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). The results show a significant difference in surface degradation and wear between the front and peripheral buttons of the drill bits. While the front buttons display a relatively smooth worn surface with shallow surface craters the peripheral buttons display a reptile skin pattern, i.e. plateaus, 200-300 gm in diameter, separated by valleys, typically 40-50 gm wide and 15-30 gm deep, The reptile skin pattern is obtained in regions where the peripheral buttons are in sliding contact against the drill hole walls and exposed to high surface temperatures caused by the frictional heating. The results indicate that the reptile skin pattern is related to friction induced thermal stresses rather than mechanical contact stresses, i.e. the reptile skin pattern is formed due to thermal fatigue, rather than mechanical fatigue, caused by the cyclic frictional heating generated at the cemented carbide button/iron ore interface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2017
Keywords
Cemented carbide, Rock drilling, Iron ore, Reptile skin, Wear mechanisms
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337108 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2017.03.004 (DOI)000412614900010 ()
Conference
17th Nordic Symposium on Tribology (NORDTRIB), JUN 14-17, 2016, Hameenlinna, FINLAND
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150193
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Saketi, S., Ostby, J. & Olsson, M. (2016). Influence of tool surface topography on the material transfer tendency and tool wear in the turning of 316L stainless steel. Wear, 368-369, 239-252
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of tool surface topography on the material transfer tendency and tool wear in the turning of 316L stainless steel
2016 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 368-369, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of tool surface topography on the initiation and build-up of transfer layers in the orthogonal turning of 316L austenitic stainless steel have been studied under well controlled conditions. Tool materials include CVD Ti(C,N)-Al2O3-TiN and PVD (Ti, ADN-(Al,Cr)(2)O-3 coated cemented carbide inserts prepared using different grinding and polishing treatments. Post-test characterization of the inserts was performed using high resolution scanning electron, microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the transfer tendency of work material is strongly affected by the surface topography of the rake face. For both types of inserts, the initial transfer and the build-up of transfer layers are localised to microscopic surface irregularities on the rake face. Consequently, an appropriate surface treatment of the cemented carbide substrate before coating deposition and the as-deposited CVD and PVD coating can be used in order to reduce the transfer tendency and the mechanical interaction between the mating surfaces. Also, an improved surface finish was found to reduce coating wear and consequently the crater wear rate of the inserts investigated. This can most likely be explained by the reduced tendency to discrete chipping of coating fragments in the contact zone and the formation of a thin transfer layer composed of Al, Si, Ca, O with beneficial friction properties which are promoted by a smooth coating surface.

Keywords
Turning, Material transfer, Surface topography, Coatings, Stainless steel
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324504 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2016.09.023 (DOI)000390733400026 ()
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Roizard, X., Heinrichs, J., Taouil, A. E., Jacobson, S., Olsson, M., Melot, J. M. & Lallemand, F. (2016). Insights into sliding wear and friction behavior of copper in ethanol containing alkylphosphonic acid molecules. Tribology International, 96, 141-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights into sliding wear and friction behavior of copper in ethanol containing alkylphosphonic acid molecules
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2016 (English)In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 96, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this work, the friction and wear behavior of bare copper was investigated for the first time under lubricated sliding conditions in diluted ethanol solutions of butylhosphonic (C4P), octylphosphonic (C8P), dodecylphosphonic (C12P), and hexadecylphosphonic (C16P) acids. The technique aims towards a more environmentally friendly lubrication to be used in shaping of copper sheets. Bare copper samples were subjected to unidirectional sliding using a tribometer with ball-on-disk contact geometry. Copper substrates (20 mm(2) x 1 mm) were run against 100Cr6 empty set10 mm ball bearing counterbodies. All tests were conducted using the same sliding conditions with a normal load of 10 N, tangential velocity of 0.01 m/s, at room temperature of 20 degrees C. Worn surfaces were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and White Light Interference Profilometry. When comparing to sliding tests in the pure ethanol solvent, significant decreases in terms of wear track dimensions, transferred material on the ball and friction coefficients are observed when active molecules are present in the solution. These form protective tribofilms exhibiting lubricating and anti-wear properties. Deeper studies on the tribological behavior of copper in C4P solution show that both low friction and low transfer of work material to the ball prevail in a specific range of low molecule concentration (5 x 10(-4) M; 25 x 10(-4) M). Even if the molecules are introduced during the test, after a few cycles, the tribological behavior improves, regardless of both friction level and copper surface degradation. Finally, specific friction tests were performed to further investigate the mechanisms. It was found that two mechanisms are involved; firstly molecules grafting onto the surface directly reduces friction, and secondly transformation of these grafted molecules into a tribofilm during the first mechanical contact cycles reduces it even further.

Keywords
Lubricated, Additives, Low friction, Phosphonic acids
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282283 (URN)10.1016/j.triboint.2015.12.040 (DOI)000371100800013 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-15941-70482-35
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Westlund, V., Heinrichs, J., Olsson, M. & Jacobson, S. (2016). Investigation of material transfer in sliding friction-topography or surface chemistry?. Tribology International, 100, 213-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of material transfer in sliding friction-topography or surface chemistry?
2016 (English)In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 100, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To differentiate between the roles of surface topography and chemical composition on influencing friction and transfer in sliding contact, a series of tests were performed in situ in an SEM. The initial sliding during metal forming was investigated, using an aluminum tip representing the work material, put into sliding contact with a polished flat tool material. Both DLC-coated and uncoated tool steel was used. By varying the final polishing step of the tool material, different surface topographies were obtained. The study demonstrates the strong influence from nano topography of an unpolished DLC coated surface on both coefficient of friction and material transfer. The influence of tool surface chemistry is also discussed.

Keywords
Sliding, Topography, Coating, Transfer
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300443 (URN)10.1016/j.triboint.2016.01.022 (DOI)000379279600025 ()
External cooperation:
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2013-5858
Available from: 2016-08-09 Created: 2016-08-09 Last updated: 2018-03-21Bibliographically approved
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