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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Marton, Z., Csitári, B., Felfoldi, T., Hidas, A., Jordan, F., Szabo, A. & Székely, A. J. (2023). Contrasting response of microeukaryotic and bacterial communities to the interplay of seasonality and local stressors in shallow soda lakes. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 99(9), Article ID fiad095.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting response of microeukaryotic and bacterial communities to the interplay of seasonality and local stressors in shallow soda lakes
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2023 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 99, no 9, article id fiad095Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seasonal environmental variation is a leading driver of microbial planktonic community assembly and interactions. However, departures from usual seasonal trends are often reported. To understand the role of local stressors in modifying seasonal succession, we sampled fortnightly, throughout three seasons, five nearby shallow soda lakes exposed to identical seasonal and meteorological changes. We characterised their microeukaryotic and bacterial communities by amplicon sequencing of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene, respectively. Biological interactions were inferred by analyses of synchronous and time-shifted interaction networks, and the keystone taxa of the communities were topologically identified. The lakes showed similar succession patterns during the study period with spring being characterised by the relevance of trophic interactions and a certain level of community stability followed by a more dynamic and variable summer-autumn period. Adaptation to general seasonal changes happened through shared core microbiome of the lakes. Stochastic events such as desiccation disrupted common network attributes and introduced shifts from the prevalent seasonal trajectory. Our results demonstrated that, despite being extreme and highly variable habitats, shallow soda lakes exhibit certain similarities in the seasonality of their planktonic communities, yet local stressors such as droughts instigate deviations from prevalent trends to a greater extent for microeukaryotic than for bacterial communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
core community, droughts, interactions, keystone species, local stressors, seasonality, soda pan
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-511147 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fiad095 (DOI)001054376200001 ()37586889 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, NP00052Wenner-Gren Foundations, UPD2020-0276Wenner-Gren Foundations, UPD2021-0024
Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2023-09-12 Last updated: 2023-09-12Bibliographically approved
Csitári, B., Bedics, A., Felföldi, T., Boros, E., Nagy, H., Mathe, I. & Székely, A. J. (2022). Anion-type modulates the effect of salt stress on saline lake bacteria. Extremophiles, 26, Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anion-type modulates the effect of salt stress on saline lake bacteria
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2022 (English)In: Extremophiles, ISSN 1431-0651, E-ISSN 1433-4909, Vol. 26, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Beside sodium chloride, inland saline aquatic systems often contain other anions than chloride such as hydrogen carbonate and sulfate. Our understanding of the biological effects of salt composition diversity is limited; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of different anions on the growth of halophilic bacteria. Accordingly, the salt composition and concentration preference of 172 strains isolated from saline and soda lakes that differed in ionic composition was tested using media containing either carbonate, chloride or sulfate as anion in concentration values ranging from 0 to 0.40 mol/L. Differences in salt-type preference among bacterial strains were observed in relationship to the salt composition of the natural habitat they were isolated from indicating specific salt-type adaptation. Sodium carbonate represented the strongest selective force, while majority of strains was well-adapted to growth even at high concentrations of sodium sulfate. Salt preference was to some extent associated with taxonomy, although variations even within the same bacterial species were also identified. Our results suggest that the extent of the effect of dissolved salts in saline lakes is not limited to their concentration but the type of anion also substantially impacts the growth and survival of individual microorganisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer NatureSpringer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Alkaline habitat, Bacterioplankton, Athalassic, Soda lake, Natronophiles, Salt stress
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-468387 (URN)10.1007/s00792-022-01260-5 (DOI)000752904900001 ()35137260 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-02-24 Created: 2022-02-24 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Bier, R. L., Vass, M., Szekely, A. J. & Langenheder, S. (2022). Effects of ecosystem size-induced environmental fluctuations on the temporal dynamics of community assembly mechanisms. The ISME Journal, 16(12), 2635-2643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of ecosystem size-induced environmental fluctuations on the temporal dynamics of community assembly mechanisms
2022 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 2635-2643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding processes that determine community membership and abundance is important for many fields from theoretical community ecology to conservation. However, spatial community studies are often conducted only at a single timepoint despite the known influence of temporal variability on community assembly processes. Here we used a spatiotemporal study to determine how environmental fluctuation differences induced by mesocosm volumes (larger volumes were more stable) influence assembly processes of aquatic bacterial metacommunities along a press disturbance gradient. By combining path analysis and network approaches, we found mesocosm size categories had distinct relative influences of assembly process and environmental factors that determined spatiotemporal bacterial community composition, including dispersal and species sorting by conductivity. These processes depended on, but were not affected proportionately by, mesocosm size. Low fluctuation, large mesocosms primarily developed through the interplay of species sorting that became more important over time and transient priority effects as evidenced by more time-delayed associations. High fluctuation, small mesocosms had regular disruptions to species sorting and greater importance of ecological drift and dispersal limitation indicated by lower richness and higher taxa replacement. Together, these results emphasize that environmental fluctuations influence ecosystems over time and its impacts are modified by biotic properties intrinsic to ecosystem size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398608 (URN)10.1038/s41396-022-01286-9 (DOI)000841713300001 ()35982230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2023-01-18Bibliographically approved
Scharnweber, K., Peura, S., Attermeyer, K., Bertilsson, S., Bolender, L., Buck, M., . . . Székely, A. J. (2021). Comprehensive analysis of chemical and biological problems associated with browning agents used in aquatic studies. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 19(12), 818-835
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comprehensive analysis of chemical and biological problems associated with browning agents used in aquatic studies
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2021 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 818-835Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inland waters receive and process large amounts of colored organic matter from the terrestrial surroundings. These inputs dramatically affect the chemical, physical, and biological properties of water bodies, as well as their roles as global carbon sinks and sources. However, manipulative studies, especially at ecosystem scale, require large amounts of dissolved organic matter with optical and chemical properties resembling indigenous organic matter. Here, we compared the impacts of two leonardite products (HuminFeed and SuperHume) and a freshly derived reverse osmosis concentrate of organic matter in a set of comprehensive mesocosm- and laboratory-scale experiments and analyses. The chemical properties of the reverse osmosis concentrate and the leonardite products were very different, with leonardite products being low and the reverse osmosis concentrate being high in carboxylic functional groups. Light had a strong impact on the properties of leonardite products, including loss of color and increased particle formation. HuminFeed presented a substantial impact on microbial communities under light conditions, where bacterial production was stimulated and community composition modified, while in dark potential inhibition of bacterial processes was detected. While none of the browning agents inhibited the growth of the tested phytoplankton Gonyostomum semen, HuminFeed had detrimental effects on zooplankton abundance and Daphnia reproduction. We conclude that the effects of browning agents extracted from leonardite, particularly HuminFeed, are in sharp contrast to those originating from terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter. Hence, they should be used with great caution in experimental studies on the consequences of terrestrial carbon for aquatic systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461034 (URN)10.1002/lom3.10463 (DOI)000711887000001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Swedish Research Council FormasEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Zhou, L., Zhou, Y., Tang, X., Zhang, Y., Zhu, G., Székely, A. J. & Jeppesen, E. (2021). Eutrophication alters bacterial co-occurrence networks and increases the importance of chromophoric dissolved organic matter composition. Limnology and Oceanography, 66(6), 2319-2332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eutrophication alters bacterial co-occurrence networks and increases the importance of chromophoric dissolved organic matter composition
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2021 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 2319-2332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eutrophication affects bacterial communities by fueling them with nutrients and carbon sources. While the influence of physicochemical conditions on bacterial communities is well studied, little is known about how dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality affects bacterial interspecific interactions and community composition with increasing eutrophication. Here, we examined the relative importance of physicochemical conditions and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) composition for bacterial community variation across trophic gradients using 109 samples data collected in 33 lakes of the Yangtze-Huaihe River basin. We found a notable increase of bacterial abundance, elevated modularity of co-occurrence networks, and decreased habitat niche breadths from mesotrophic sites to hyper-eutrophic sites, suggesting changes in co-occurrence patterns with eutrophication. Variation partitioning revealed that the proportion purely explained by CDOM composition was higher at the moderate- and hyper-eutrophic sites than at the mesotrophic sites. Moreover, the module structures of the networks correlated significantly with CDOM composition at the eutrophic sites but not at the mesotrophic sites. The significant negative correlation between community-level habitat niche breadths and the intensities of the protein-like components at the moderate- and hyper-eutrophic sites indicates a strong association between biolabile protein-like compounds and habitat specialists in nutrient and substrate enriched lake systems. Our results suggest that consideration of DOM composition can strengthen the identification of links between environmental factors and bacterial community composition and interspecific interactions, especially under resource-rich conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2021
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-454520 (URN)10.1002/lno.11756 (DOI)000643152400001 ()
Available from: 2021-09-29 Created: 2021-09-29 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Lundy, L., Fatta-Kassinos, D., Slobodnik, J., Karaolia, P., Cirka, L., Kreuzinger, N., . . . Viklander, M. (2021). Making Waves: Collaboration in the time of SARS-CoV-2-rapid development of an international co-operation and wastewater surveillance database to support public health decision-making. Water Research, 199, Article ID 117167.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making Waves: Collaboration in the time of SARS-CoV-2-rapid development of an international co-operation and wastewater surveillance database to support public health decision-making
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2021 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 199, article id 117167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in wastewater was first reported in March 2020. Over the subsequent months, the potential for wastewater surveillance to contribute to COVID-19 mitigation programmes has been the focus of intense national and international research activities, gaining the attention of policy makers and the public. As a new application of an established methodology, focused collaboration between public health practitioners and wastewater researchers is essential to developing a common understanding on how, when and where the outputs of this non-invasive community-level approach can deliver actionable outcomes for public health authorities. Within this context, the NORMAN SCORE "SARS-CoV-2 in sewage" database provides a platform for rapid, open access data sharing, validated by the uploading of 276 data sets from nine countries to-date. Through offering direct access to underpinning meta-data sets (and describing its use in data interpretation), the NORMAN SCORE database is a resource for the development of recommendations on minimum data requirements for wastewater pathogen surveillance. It is also a tool to engage public health practitioners in discussions on use of the approach, providing an opportunity to build mutual understanding of the demand and supply for data and facilitate the translation of this promising research application into public health practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-447942 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2021.117167 (DOI)000659348700013 ()34015748 (PubMedID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2016-05176EU, Horizon 2020, 831644European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 313011ASS8
Available from: 2021-07-01 Created: 2021-07-01 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Zhou, L., Zhou, Y., Tang, X., Zhang, Y., Jang, K.-S., Székely, A. J. & Jeppesen, E. (2021). Resource aromaticity affects bacterial community successions in response to different sources of dissolved organic matter. Water Research, 190, Article ID 116776.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource aromaticity affects bacterial community successions in response to different sources of dissolved organic matter
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2021 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 190, article id 116776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbe-mediated transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) contributes substantially to the carbon dynamics and energy flow of aquatic ecosystems; yet, the temporal dynamics of bacterial communities in response to diverse DOM sources are scarcely known. Here, we supplied four distinct sources of DOM (algae-derived, macrophyte-derived, sewage-derived, and soil-derived) to the same bacterial community to track the effects of these DOM sources on the carbon processing and successional dynamics of bacterial communities. Although by the end of the incubation the proportion of bio-degraded DOM was significantly lower in the soil-derived DOM treatment than for the other sources, rapid initial metabolism of protein-like and aliphatic compounds and increasing aromaticity and humification degree of DOM during the incubation period were observed for all sources. The role of stochastic processes in governing the community assembly decreased substantially from 61.4% on the first day to 16.7% at the end of the incubation. Moreover, stronger deterministic selection and lower temporal turnover rate were observed for the soil-derived than the other DOM sources, indicating stronger environmental filtering by the more aromatic DOM. Significant correlations were also observed between the humification index (HIX) of DOM and bacterial community diversities, co-occurrence patterns, habitat niche breadths, and the contribution of deterministic ecological processes. In addition, we demonstrated that taxa with different abundance patterns all play crucial but different roles in the response to DOM variation. Our results indicate the importance of DOM aromaticity as a predictor of the outcome of different DOM sources on bacterial community dynamics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2021
Keywords
Dissolved organic matter, Different sources, Bacterial community, Successional dynamics, Ecological processes, Aromaticity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-442737 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2020.116776 (DOI)000632807700075 ()33387955 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-09 Created: 2021-06-09 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Malki, K., Sawaya, N. A., Tisza, M. J., Coutinho, F. H., Rosario, K., Székely, A. J. & Breitbart, M. (2021). Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Prokaryotic and Viral Community Assemblages in a Lotic System (Manatee Springs, Florida). Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 87(18), Article ID e00646-21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Prokaryotic and Viral Community Assemblages in a Lotic System (Manatee Springs, Florida)
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2021 (English)In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 87, no 18, article id e00646-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How from high-magnitude springs fed by the Floridan aquifer system contributes hundreds of liters of water per second to rivers, creating unique lotic systems. Despite their importance as freshwater sources and their contributions to the state's major rivers, little is known about the composition and spatiotemporal variability of prokaryotic and viral communities of these spring systems or their influence on downstream river sites. At four time points throughout a year, we determined the abundance and diversity of prokaryotic and viral communities at three sites within the first-magnitude Manatee Springs system (the spring head where water emerges from the aquifer, a mixed region where the spring run ends, and a downstream site in the Suwannee River). The abundance of prokaryotes and virus-like particles increased 100-fold from the spring head to the river and few members from the head communities persisted in the river at low abundance, suggesting the springs play a minor role in seeding downstream communities. Prokaryotic and viral communities within Manatee Springs clustered by site, with seasonal variability likely driven by flow. As water flowed through the system, microbial community composition was affected by changes in physiochemical parameters and community coalescence. Evidence of species sorting and mass effects could be seen in the assemblages. Greater temporal fluctuations were observed in prokaryotic and viral community composition with increasing distance from the spring outflow, reflecting the relative stability of the groundwater environment, and comparisons to springs from prior work reaffirmed that distinct first-magnitude springs support unique communities. IMPORTANCE Prokaryotic and viral communities are central to food webs and biogeochemical processes in aquatic environments, where they help maintain ecosystem health. The Floridan aquifer system (FAS), which is the primary drinking water source for millions of people in the southeastern United States, contributes large amounts of freshwater to major river systems in Florida through its springs. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the spatiotemporal dynamics of microbial communities in these essential flowing freshwater systems. This work explored the prokaryotic and viral communities in a first-magnitude spring system fed by the FAS that discharges millions of liters of water per day into the Suwannee River. This study examined microbial community composition through space and time as well as the environmental parameters and metacommunity assembly mechanisms that shape these communities, providing a foundational understanding for monitoring future changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for MicrobiologyAMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY, 2021
Keywords
freshwater, environmental microbiology, virome, springs, prokaryote, virus, microbial ecology, lotic systems, community coalescence
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-456515 (URN)10.1128/AEM.00646-21 (DOI)000693759600006 ()34232732 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Available from: 2021-10-25 Created: 2021-10-25 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Vass, M., Szekely, A. J., Lindström, E. S., Osman, O. & Langenheder, S. (2021). Warming mediates the resistance of aquatic bacteria to invasion during community coalescence. Molecular Ecology, 30(5), 1345-1356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Warming mediates the resistance of aquatic bacteria to invasion during community coalescence
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2021 (English)In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1345-1356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The immigration history of communities can profoundly affect community composition. For instance, early‐arriving species can have a lasting effect on community structure by reducing the invasion success of late‐arriving ones through priority effects. This can be particularly important when early‐arriving communities coalesce with another community during dispersal (mixing) events. However, the outcome of such community coalescence is unknown as we lack knowledge on how different factors influence the persistence of early‐arriving communities and the invasion success of late‐arriving taxa. Therefore, we implemented a full‐factorial experiment with aquatic bacteria where temperature and dispersal rate of a better adapted community were manipulated to test their joint effects on the resistance of early‐arriving communities to invasion, both at community and population level. Our 16S rRNA gene sequencing‐based results showed that invasion success of better adapted late‐arriving bacteria equaled or even exceeded what we expected based on the dispersal ratios of the recipient and invading communities suggesting limited priority effects on the community level. Patterns detected at the population level, however, showed that resistance of aquatic bacteria to invasion might be strengthened by warming as higher temperatures (a) increased the sum of relative abundances of persistent bacteria in the recipient communities, and (b) restricted the total relative abundance of successfully established late‐arriving bacteria. Warming‐enhanced resistance, however, was not always found and its strengths differed between recipient communities and dispersal rates. Nevertheless, our findings highlight the potential role of warming in mitigating the effects of invasion at the population level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
dispersal, immigration, invasion, mixing, warming
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398733 (URN)10.1111/mec.15800 (DOI)000613687100001 ()33448073 (PubMedID)
Note

Title in thesis list of papers: Warming-enhanced priority effects at population and community levels in aquatic bacteria

Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Felfoldi, T., Nagymate, Z., Szekely, A. J., Jurecska, L. & Marialigeti, K. (2020). Biological treatment of coke plant effluents: from a microbiological perspective. BIOLOGIA FUTURA, 71(4), 359-370
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biological treatment of coke plant effluents: from a microbiological perspective
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2020 (English)In: BIOLOGIA FUTURA, ISSN 2676-8615, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 359-370Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During coke production, large volume of effluent is generated, which has a very complex chemical composition and contains several toxic and carcinogenic substances, mainly aromatic compounds, cyanide, thiocyanate and ammonium. The composition of these high-strength effluents is very diverse and depends on the quality of coals used and the operating and technological parameters of coke ovens. In general, after initial physicochemical treatment, biological purification steps are applied in activated sludge bioreactors. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the anaerobic and aerobic transformation processes and describes key microorganisms, such as phenol- and thiocyanate-degrading, floc-forming, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria, which contribute to the removal of pollutants from coke plant effluents. Providing the theoretical basis for technical issues (in this case the microbiology of coke plant effluent treatment) aids the optimization of existing technologies and the design of new management techniques.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG, 2020
Keywords
Activated sludge, Bioreactor, Phenols, Thiocyanate, Toxic compounds
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-439698 (URN)10.1007/s42977-020-00028-2 (DOI)000563573000001 ()
Available from: 2021-04-09 Created: 2021-04-09 Last updated: 2021-04-09Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8063-7156

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