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Elmståhl, Helena
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Oljans, E., Elmståhl, H., Mattsson Sydner, Y. & Hjälmeskog, K. (2018). From nutrients to wellbeing identifying discourses of food in relation to health in syllabi. Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 26(1), 35-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From nutrients to wellbeing identifying discourses of food in relation to health in syllabi
2018 (English)In: Pedagogy, Culture & Society, ISSN 1468-1366, E-ISSN 1747-5104, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food and health have long had dominant position within the subject of Home Economics (HE) in Sweden. However, what constitutes a proper diet, and how it is associated with a healthy lifestyle changes over time. In this article, a discourse analytic approach combined with a didactic perspective are used as the theoretical frame. The aim is to explore how food in relation to health has been constructed within the syllabus of HE. Six HE syllabi from 1962 to 2011 were analysed. From the results three different discourses were identified and named after their main areas of focus: (i) the medical discourse, (ii) the consumer discourse and (iii) the human ecological discourse. Each discourse represents a different way of constructing food in relation to health, and different representations have dominated over the past fifty years. The construction of food in relation to health is thereby seen in its historical and cultural context according to what this knowledge content includes or excludes.

National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330552 (URN)10.1080/14681366.2017.1345974 (DOI)000432912100003 ()
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Bergman, K., Persson Osowski, C., Eli, K., Lövestam, E., Elmståhl, H. & Nowicka, P. (2018). Stakeholder responses to governmental dietary guidelines: Challenging the status quo, or reinforcing it?. British Food Journal, 120(3), 613-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stakeholder responses to governmental dietary guidelines: Challenging the status quo, or reinforcing it?
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2018 (English)In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 613-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how stakeholders in the food and nutrition field construct and conceptualise “appropriate” national dietary advice.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 40 voluntarily written stakeholder responses to updated official dietary guidelines in Sweden were analysed thematically. The analysis explored the logics and arguments employed by authorities, interest organisations, industry and private stakeholders in attempting to influence the formulation of dietary guidelines.

Findings

Two main themes were identified: the centrality of anchoring advice scientifically and modes of getting the message across to the public. Stakeholders expressed a view of effective health communication as that which is nutritionally and quantitatively oriented and which optimises individuals’ capacities to take action for their own health. Their responses did not offer alternative framings of how healthy eating could be practiced but rather conveyed an understanding of dietary guidelines as documents that provide simplified answers to complex questions.

Practical implications

Policymakers should be aware of industrial actors’ potential vested interests and actively seek out other stakeholders representing communities and citizen interests. The next step should be to question the extent to which it is ethical to publish dietary advice that represents a simplified way of conceptualising behavioural change, and thereby places responsibility for health on the individual.

Originality/value

This research provides a stakeholder perspective on the concept of dietary advice and is among the first to investigate referral responses to dietary guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Food policy, Concept of advice, Dietary guidelines, Nutritional reductionism, Stakeholder influences
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Ethics
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341383 (URN)10.1108/BFJ-08-2017-0466 (DOI)000427495600008 ()
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2019-10-13Bibliographically approved
Bergman, K., Elmståhl, H., Lövestam, E., Nowicka, P., Eli, K. & Persson Osowski, C. (2017). Healthy eating as conceptualized in referral responses to Sweden’s updated dietary guidelines: excluding the complexity of everyday life. In: : . Paper presented at Fifth BSA Sociology of Food Study Group Conference 2017 Food and Society, London 26 June-27 June..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy eating as conceptualized in referral responses to Sweden’s updated dietary guidelines: excluding the complexity of everyday life
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

National Dietary Guidelines have been published in many countries to support healthier food habits among the public. In Sweden, the guidelines are produced in a process involving experts and stakeholders under the responsibility of the National Food Agency. Stakeholder perspectives on the concept of state dietary advice was explored in this study, by analyzing 40 referral responses on updated guidelines in Sweden 2015. The study focused on ideas about how state dietary advice should be framed and what it should be based on. Thematic analysis was used and resulted in two main themes. 'Securing scientifically proven advice' represented a perspective of the guidelines as to be scientifically correct and verified, and built upon an underlying assumption to present an objective and optimal composition of foods and nutrients that will fit all. Arguments based on nutritional reductionism could be seen, which gave a delimited idea of what healthy food is. 'Getting the message across' represented a perspective of the guidelines to be easily understood by and inclusive to the end user. Clarity in advice was seen to be reached by explaining difficult words, defining amounts and exact mechanisms of why something is a good choice. Also this perspective added to excluding other values of food, especially qualitative ones. The construction of a healthy diet in these remittance responses builds upon a notion of an ideal diet composed on the basis of the best scientific proof and clearly presented so as to be easily understood and practiced. It was clearly based on an individualistic behavioral view making the individual responsible to make informed and good choices for a healthy diet. This approach may be questioned, as it is too simplified to include the complex reality of everyday life.

Keywords
dietary guidelines
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328784 (URN)
Conference
Fifth BSA Sociology of Food Study Group Conference 2017 Food and Society, London 26 June-27 June.
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-04
Bergman, K., Fjellström, C. & Elmståhl, H. (2016). New Dietary Advice in Sweden –How are they perceived?: Responses  to a holistic approach. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Nutrition Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Dietary Advice in Sweden –How are they perceived?: Responses  to a holistic approach
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Keywords
Dietary guidelines
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298160 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
Nordic Nutrition Conference
Available from: 2016-06-30 Created: 2016-06-30 Last updated: 2016-09-06Bibliographically approved
Schiöth, H., Ferriday, D., Davies, S., Benedict, C., Elmståhl, H., Brunstrom, J. & Hogenkamp, P. S. (2015). Are you sure?: Confidence about the satiating capacity of a food affects subsequent food intake. Nutrients, 7(7), 5088-5097
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are you sure?: Confidence about the satiating capacity of a food affects subsequent food intake
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2015 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 5088-5097Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Expectations about a food’s satiating capacity predict self-selected portion size, food intake and food choice. However, two individuals might have a similar expectation, but one might be extremely confident while the other might be guessing. It is unclear whether confidence about an expectation affects adjustments in energy intake at a subsequent meal. In a randomized cross-over design, 24 subjects participated in three separate breakfast sessions, and were served a low-energy-dense preload (53 kcal/100 g), a high-energy-dense preload (94 kcal/100 g), or no preload. Subjects received ambiguous information about the preload’s satiating capacity and rated how confident they were about their expected satiation before consuming the preload in its entirety. They were served an ad libitum test meal 30 min later. Confidence ratings were negatively associated with energy compensation after consuming the high-energy-dense preload (r = −0.61; p = 0.001). The same relationship was evident after consuming the low-energy-dense preload, but only after controlling for dietary restraint, hunger prior to, and liking of the test meal (p = 0.03). Our results suggest that confidence modifies short-term controls of food intake by affecting energy compensation. These results merit consideration because imprecise caloric compensation has been identified as a potential risk factor for a positive energy balance and weight gain.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-256684 (URN)10.3390/nu7075088 (DOI)000359349800002 ()
Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Elmståhl, H. & Lange, M. (2015). Hem- och konsumentkunskap - att förstå sina rättigheter som en framtida konsument. In: Christina Fjellström (Ed.), Klagandets diskurs - matforskare reflekterar: (pp. 199-206). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hem- och konsumentkunskap - att förstå sina rättigheter som en framtida konsument
2015 (Swedish)In: Klagandets diskurs - matforskare reflekterar / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015, p. 199-206Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252452 (URN)978-91-554-9176-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2015-06-25Bibliographically approved
Elmståhl, H. (2014). Energy for Energetic Shoes. In: Carin Eriksson Lindvall, Kerstin Rydbeck och Louise Rugheimer (Ed.), Head over Heels: Seventeen Women Researchers Thoughts on Shoes (pp. 39-41). Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy for Energetic Shoes
2014 (English)In: Head over Heels: Seventeen Women Researchers Thoughts on Shoes / [ed] Carin Eriksson Lindvall, Kerstin Rydbeck och Louise Rugheimer, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2014, p. 39-41Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2014
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235042 (URN)978-91-506-2412-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2014-10-28
Elmståhl, H. (2013). Energiska skor kräver energi. In: Carin Eriksson Lindvall, Kerstin Rydbeck och Louise Rugheimer (Ed.), Skor är huvudsaken: Sjutton kvinnliga forskares funderingar om skor (pp. 39-41). Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energiska skor kräver energi
2013 (Swedish)In: Skor är huvudsaken: Sjutton kvinnliga forskares funderingar om skor / [ed] Carin Eriksson Lindvall, Kerstin Rydbeck och Louise Rugheimer, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2013, p. 39-41Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198743 (URN)978-91-506-2334-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-04-24 Created: 2013-04-24 Last updated: 2013-11-06Bibliographically approved
Oljans, E., Mattsson Sydner, Y. & Elmståhl, H. (2013). The construction of diet in the Swedish syllabus for Home and Consumer Studies. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Educational Research Association 41st Congress. "Disruptions and eruptions as opportunities for transforming education" Reykjavik, Iceland. March 7-9, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The construction of diet in the Swedish syllabus for Home and Consumer Studies
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235011 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association 41st Congress. "Disruptions and eruptions as opportunities for transforming education" Reykjavik, Iceland. March 7-9, 2013
Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2014-11-03Bibliographically approved
Krog-Mikkelsen, I., Sloth, B., Dimitrov, D., Tetens, I., Björck, I., Flint, A., . . . Raben, A. (2011). A Low glycemic index diet does not affect postprandial energy metabolism but decreases postprandial insulinemia and inccreases fullness ratings in healthy women. Journal of Nutrition, 141(9), 1679-1684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Low glycemic index diet does not affect postprandial energy metabolism but decreases postprandial insulinemia and inccreases fullness ratings in healthy women
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 141, no 9, p. 1679-1684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At present, it is difficult to determine whether glycemic index (GI) is an important tool in the prevention of lifestyle diseases, and long-term studies investigating GI with diets matched in macronutrient composition, fiber content, energy content, and energy density are still scarce. We investigated the effects of 2 high-carbohydrate (55%) diets with low GI (LGI; 79) or high GI (HGI; 103) on postprandial blood profile, subjective appetite sensations, energy expenditure (EE), substrate oxidation rates, and ad libitum energy intake (EI) from a corresponding test meal (LGI or HGI) after consuming the diets ad libitum for 10 wk. Two groups of a total of 29 healthy, overweight women (age: 30.5 ± 6.6 y; BMI: 27.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2) participated in the 10-wk intervention and a subsequent 4-h meal test. The breakfast test meals differed in GI but were equal in total energy, macronutrient composition, fiber content, and energy density. The LGI meal resulted in lower plasma glucose, serum insulin, and plasma glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and higher plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations than the HGI meal (P ≤ 0.05). Ratings of fullness were slightly higher and the desire to eat something fatty was lower after the test meal in the LGI group (P < 0.05). Postprandial plasma GLP-2, plasma glucagon, serum leptin, plasma ghrelin, EE, substrate oxidation rates, and ad libitum EI at lunch did not differ between groups. In conclusion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and subjective appetite ratings after a test meal were better after 10-wk ad libitum intake of a LGI compared to a HGI diet. EE and substrate oxidation rates were, however, not affected. These findings give some support to recommendations to consume a LGI diet.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-161341 (URN)10.3945/jn.110.134627 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-11-18 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
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