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König, Niclas
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Bimpisidis, Z., König, N., Stagkourakis, S., Zell, V., Vlcek, B., Dumas, S., . . . Wallén-Mackenzie, Å. (2019). The NeuroD6 Subtype of VTA Neurons Contributes to Psychostimulant Sensitization and Behavioral Reinforcement. eNeuro, 6(3), Article ID e0066-19.2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The NeuroD6 Subtype of VTA Neurons Contributes to Psychostimulant Sensitization and Behavioral Reinforcement
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2019 (English)In: eNeuro, E-ISSN 2373-2822, Vol. 6, no 3, article id e0066-19.2019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reward-related behavior is complex and its dysfunction correlated with neuropsychiatric illness. Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have long been associated with different aspects of reward function, but it remains to be disentangled how distinct VTA DA neurons contribute to the full range of behaviors ascribed to the VTA. Here, a recently identified subtype of VTA neurons molecularly defined by NeuroD6 (NEX1M) was addressed. Among all VTA DA neurons, less than 15% were identified as positive for NeuroD6. In addition to dopaminergic markers, sparse NeuroD6 neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) gene. To achieve manipulation of NeuroD6 VTA neurons, NeuroD6(NEX)-Cre-driven mouse genetics and optogenetics were implemented. First, expression of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) was ablated to disrupt dopaminergic function in NeuroD6 VTA neurons. Comparing Vmat2(Cre)(lox/lox;NEX-) conditional knock-out (cKO) mice with littermate controls, it was evident that baseline locomotion, preference for sugar and ethanol, and place preference upon amphetamine-induced and cocaine-induced conditioning were similar between genotypes. However, locomotion upon repeated psychostimulant administration was significantly elevated above control levels in cKO mice. Second, optogenetic activation of NEX-Cre VTA neurons was shown to induce DA release and glutamatergic postsynaptic currents within the nucleus accumbens. Third, optogenetic stimulation of NEX-Cre VTA neurons in vivo induced significant place preference behavior, while stimulation of VTA neurons defined by Calretinin failed to cause a similar response. The results show that NeuroD6 VTA neurons exert distinct regulation over specific aspects of reward-related behavior, findings that contribute to the current understanding of VTA neurocircuitry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SOC NEUROSCIENCE, 2019
Keywords
accumbens, dopamine, mouse genetics, optogenetics, reward, ventral tegmental area
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390531 (URN)10.1523/ENEURO.0066-19.2019 (DOI)000473806900022 ()31097625 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEU, European Research Council
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Schizas, N., König, N., Andersson, B., Vasylovska, S., Hoeber, J., Kozlova, E. & Hailer, N. (2018). Neural crest stem cells protect spinal cord neurons from excitotoxic damage and inhibit glial activation by secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Cell and Tissue Research, 372(3), 493-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural crest stem cells protect spinal cord neurons from excitotoxic damage and inhibit glial activation by secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor
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2018 (English)In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 372, no 3, p. 493-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The acute phase of spinal cord injury is characterized by excitotoxic and inflammatory events that mediate extensive neuronal loss in the gray matter. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can exert neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that may be mediated by soluble factors. We therefore hypothesize that transplantation of NCSCs to acutely injured spinal cord slice cultures (SCSCs) can prevent neuronal loss after excitotoxic injury. NCSCs were applied onto SCSCs previously subjected to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced injury. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining were used to quantitatively study cell populations and apoptosis. Concentrations of neurotrophic factors were measured by ELISA. Migration and differentiation properties of NCSCs on SCSCs, laminin, or hyaluronic acid hydrogel were separately studied. NCSCs counteracted the loss of NeuN-positive neurons that was otherwise observed after NMDA-induced excitotoxicity, partly by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. They also reduced activation of both microglial cells and astrocytes. The concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was increased in supernatants from SCSCs cultured with NCSCs compared to SCSCs alone and BDNF alone mimicked the effects of NCSC application on SCSCs. NCSCs migrated superficially across the surface of SCSCs and showed no signs of neuronal or glial differentiation but preserved their expression of SOX2 and Krox20. In conclusion, NCSCs exert neuroprotective, anti-apoptotic and glia-inhibitory effects on excitotoxically injured spinal cord tissue, some of these effects mediated by secretion of BDNF. However, the investigated NCSCs seem not to undergo neuronal or glial differentiation in the short term since markers indicative of an undifferentiated state were expressed during the entire observation period.

Keywords
Neuroprotection, Suppressed glial activation, Excitotoxicity, Apoptosis, Secretion of soluble factors
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356852 (URN)10.1007/s00441-018-2808-z (DOI)000432109000004 ()29516218 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 20716Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Hoeber, J., König, N., Trolle, C., Lekholm, E., Zhou, C., Pankratova, S., . . . Kozlova, E. (2017). A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord. Stem Cells and Development, 26(14), 1065-1077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord
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2017 (English)In: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 26, no 14, p. 1065-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spinal root injuries result in newly formed glial scar formation, which prevents regeneration of sensory axons causing permanent sensory loss. Previous studies showed that delivery of trophic factors or implantation of human neural progenitor cells supports sensory axon regeneration and partly restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (MesoMIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along "bridges" formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of MesoMIM prevented stem cell migration, "bridges" were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting their level of differentiation. Our data show that (1) the ability of stem cells to migrate into the spinal cord and organize cellular "bridges" in the newly formed interface is crucial for successful sensory axon regeneration, (2) trophic factor mimetics delivered by mesoporous silica may be a convenient alternative way to induce sensory axon regeneration, and (3) a combinatorial approach of individually beneficial components is not necessarily additive, but can be counterproductive for axonal growth.

Keywords
biomimetics, neural stem cells, spinal cord regeneration, stem cell transplantation
National Category
Neurosciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328587 (URN)10.1089/scd.2017.0019 (DOI)000405071200005 ()28562227 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist ByggmästareSwedish Research Council, 20716
Note

De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
König, N., Trolle, C., Kapuralin, K., Adameyko, I., Mitrecic, D., Aldskogius, H., . . . Kozlova, E. (2017). Murine neural crest stem cells and embryonic stem cell derived neuron precursors survive and differentiate after transplantation in a model of dorsal root avulsion. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, 11(1), 129-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Murine neural crest stem cells and embryonic stem cell derived neuron precursors survive and differentiate after transplantation in a model of dorsal root avulsion
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1932-6254, E-ISSN 1932-7005, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spinal root avulsion results in paralysis and sensory loss, and is commonly associated with chronic pain. In addition to the failure of avulsed dorsal root axons to regenerate into the spinal cord, avulsion injury leads to extensive neuroinflammation and degeneration of second order neurons in the dorsal horn. The ultimate objective with the treatment of this condition is to counteract degeneration of spinal cord neurons and to achieve functionally useful regeneration/reconnection of sensory neurons with spinal cord neurons. Here we explore if stem cells transplanted on the surface of avulsed spinal cord can survive, differentiate and migrate into the damaged spinal cord during the first few weeks after this intervention. Murine boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) or embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived, pre-differentiated neuron precursors were implanted acutely at the junction between avulsed dorsal roots L3-L6 and the spinal cord. Both types of cells survived transplantation, but showed distinctly different modes of differentiation. Thus, bNCSCs migrated into the spinal cord, expressed glial markers, and formed elongated tubes in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) compartment of the avulsed dorsal root transitional zone(DRTZ) area. In contrast, the ESC-transplants remained at the site of implantation and differentiated to motor neurons and interneurons. These data show that both stem cell types successfully survive implantation to the acutely injured spinal cord and maintained their differentiation and migration potential. These data suggest that depending on the source of neural stem cells, they can play different beneficial roles for recovery after dorsal root avulsion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
sensory neuron, spinal cord, dorsal root transitional zone, regeneration, migration, glial cells, Schwann cells, motor neurons
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-218684 (URN)10.1002/term.1893 (DOI)000394173600012 ()24753366 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 20716
Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hoeber, J., Trolle, C., König, N., Du, Z., Gallo, A., Hermans, E., . . . Kozlova, E. N. (2015). Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury. Scientific Reports, 5, Article ID 10666.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury
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2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 10666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system.

National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251488 (URN)10.1038/srep10666 (DOI)000356063500001 ()26053681 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 5420, 20716
Available from: 2015-04-20 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Kosykh, A., Ngamjariyawat, A., Vasylovska, S., König, N., Trolle, C., Lau, J., . . . N. Kozlova, E. (2015). Neural crest stem cells from hair follicles and boundary cap have different  effects on pancreatic islets in vitro. International Journal of Neuroscience, 125(7), 547-554
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural crest stem cells from hair follicles and boundary cap have different  effects on pancreatic islets in vitro
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0020-7454, E-ISSN 1563-5279, Vol. 125, no 7, p. 547-554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

Neural crest stem cells derived from the boundary cap (bNCSCs), markedly promote survival, proliferation and function of insulin producing β-cells in vitro and in vivo after coculture/transplantation with pancreatic islets [ 1, 2 ]. Recently, we have shown that beneficial effects on β-cells require cadherin contacts between bNCSCs and β-cells [ 3, 4 ]. Here we investigated whether hair follicle (HF) NCSCs, a potential source for human allogeneic transplantation, exert similar positive effects on β-cells.

Materials and Methods:

We established cocultures of HF-NCSCs or bNCSCs from mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein together with pancreatic islets from DxRed expressing mice or NMRI mice and compared their migration towards islet cells and effect on proliferation of β-cells as well as intracellular relations between NCSCs and islets using qRT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry.

Results:

Whereas both types of NCSCs migrated extensively in the presence of islets, only bNCSCs demonstrated directed migration toward islets, induced β-cell proliferation and increased the presence of cadherin at the junctions between bNCSCs and β-cells. Even in direct contact between β-cells and HF-NCSCs, no cadherin expression was detected.

Conclusions:

These observations indicate that HF-NCSCs do not confer the same positive effect on β-cells as demonstrated for bNCSCs. Furthermore, these data suggest that induction of cadherin expression by HF-NCSCs may be useful for their ability to support β-cells in coculture and after transplantation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Diabetes, cell culture, coculture, intercellular contacts, migration
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233149 (URN)10.3109/00207454.2014.950373 (DOI)000359884200011 ()25077520 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 20716
Note

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet

Available from: 2014-09-29 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11
König, N. (2015). Reconnecting the CNS and PNS with Stem Cell Transplantation. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconnecting the CNS and PNS with Stem Cell Transplantation
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Severe injury may result in disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Regeneration of the central portion of sensory neurons into the spinal cord is notoriously poor in adult mammals, with low regenerative drive and an unpermissive central environment, most likely resulting in persistent loss of sensory function. A variety of strategies have been addressedto augment regeneration, including application of growth promoting factors, counteraction of inhibitory molecules, and provision of growth permissive substrates. Stem cells have been investigated in these contexts, as well as for the possibility of providing new neurons to act as a relay between the periphery and spinal cord. Here we have investigated different sources of neural stem cells for their ability to form neurons and glia after transplantation to the periphery; to project axons into the spinal cord; and to assist regeneration of surviving sensory neurons. These have been performed at two locations: the "dorsal root ganglion cavity", and the transitional zone following dorsal root avulsion. Neurons and glia were generated form mouse boundary cap neural crest stem cells and embryonic stem cell derived ventral spinal cord progenitors, and in addition to this, regeneration of sensory fibers was observed after transplantation of human fetal spinal cord derived progenitors and human embryonic stem cell derived ventral spinal cord progenitors. Further, delivery of neurotrophic factor mimetics via mesoporous silica nanoparticles proved a valuable tool for stem cell survival and differentiation. While technological advances make in vivo differentiation a realistic goal, our findings indicate that so far assisting regeneration of host sensory fibers to reconnect with the spinal cord by transplantation of stem cells is a more reliable strategy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015. p. 54
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1105
Keywords
stem cell transplantation, regenerative neurobiology, nerve injury repair
National Category
Neurosciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251546 (URN)978-91-554-9252-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-06-08, B/C2:301, BMC, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Trolle, C., Abrahamsson, N., König, N., Vasylovska, S. & Kozlova, E. (2014). Boundary cap neural crest stem cells homotopically implanted to the injured dorsal root transitional zone give rise to different types of neurons and glia in adult rodents. BMC neuroscience (Online), 15, 60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundary cap neural crest stem cells homotopically implanted to the injured dorsal root transitional zone give rise to different types of neurons and glia in adult rodents
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2014 (English)In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 15, p. 60-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The boundary cap is a transient group of neural crest-derived cells located at the presumptive dorsal root transitional zone (DRTZ) when sensory axons enter the spinal cord during development. Later, these cells migrate to dorsal root ganglia and differentiate into subtypes of sensory neurons and glia. After birth when the DRTZ is established, sensory axons are no longer able to enter the spinal cord. Here we explored the fate of mouse bNCSCs implanted to the uninjured DRTZ after dorsal root avulsion for their potential to assist sensory axon regeneration. Grafted cells showed extensive survival and differentiation after transplantation to the avulsed DRTZ. Transplanted cells located outside the spinal cord organized elongated tubes of Sox2/GFAP expressing cells closely associated with regenerating sensory axons or appeared as small clusters on the surface of the spinal cord. Others, migrating into the host spinal cordas single cells, differentiated to spinal cord neurons with different neurotransmitter characteristics, extensive fiber organization, and in some cases surrounded by glutamatergic terminal-like profiles. These findings demonstrate that bNCSCs implanted at the site of dorsal root avulsion injury display remarkable differentiation plasticity inside the spinal cord and in the peripheral compartment where they organize tubes associated with regenerating sensory fibers. These properties offer a basis for exploring the ability of bNCSCs to assist regeneration of sensory axons into the spinal cord and replace lost neurons in the injured spinal cord.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
neural stem cell, sensory neuron, spinal cord injury, cell differentiation, nerve regeneration, cell replacement
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Research subject
Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-218685 (URN)10.1186/1471-2202-15-60 (DOI)000337318200001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 20716Swedish Research Council, 5420
Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Garcia-Bennett, A., König, N., Abrahamsson, N., Kozhevnikova, M., Zhou, C., Trolle, C., . . . Kozlova, E. (2014). In vitro generation of motor neuron precursors from mouse embryonic stem cells using mesoporous nanoparticles. Nanomedicine, 9(16), 2457-2466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro generation of motor neuron precursors from mouse embryonic stem cells using mesoporous nanoparticles
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2014 (English)In: Nanomedicine, ISSN 1743-5889, E-ISSN 1748-6963, Vol. 9, no 16, p. 2457-2466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Stem cell-derived motor neurons (MNs) are utilized to develop replacement strategies for spinal cord disorders. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into MN precursors involves factors and their repeated administration. We investigated if delivery of factors loaded into mesoporous nanoparticles could be effective for stem cell differentiation in vitro.

Materials & methods: We used a mouse embryonic stem cell line expressing green fluorescent protein under the promoter for the MN-specific gene Hb9 to visualize the level of MN differentiation. The differentiation of stem cells was evaluated by expression of MN-specific transcription factors monitored by quantitative real-time PCR reactions and immunocytochemistry.

Results: Mesoporous nanoparticles have strong affiliation to the embryoid bodies, penetrate inside the embryoid bodies and come in contact with differentiating cells.

Conclusion: Repeated administration of soluble factors into a culture medium can be avoided due to a sustained release effect using mesoporous silica.

National Category
Neurosciences Medical Biotechnology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224650 (URN)10.2217/nnm.14.23 (DOI)000346177600004 ()
Note

De 2 förstaförfattarna delar förstaförfattarskapet

Available from: 2014-05-16 Created: 2014-05-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Garcia-Bennett, A. E., Kozhevnikova, M., König, N., Zhou, C., Leao, R., Knöpfel, T., . . . Kozlova, E. N. (2013). Delivery of Differentiation Factors by Mesoporous Silica Particles Assists Advanced Differentiation of Transplanted Murine Embryonic Stem Cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine, 2(11), 906-915
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delivery of Differentiation Factors by Mesoporous Silica Particles Assists Advanced Differentiation of Transplanted Murine Embryonic Stem Cells
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2013 (English)In: Stem Cells Translational Medicine, ISSN 2157-6564, E-ISSN 2157-6580, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 906-915Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stem cell transplantation holds great hope for the replacement of damaged cells in the nervous system. However, poor long-term survival after transplantation and insufficiently robust differentiation of stem cells into specialized cell types in vivo remain major obstacles for clinical application. Here, we report the development of a novel technological approach for the local delivery of exogenous trophic factor mimetics to transplanted cells using specifically designed silica nanoporous particles. We demonstrated that delivering Cintrofin and Gliafin, established peptide mimetics of the ciliary neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, respectively, with these particles enabled not only robust functional differentiation of motor neurons from transplanted embryonic stem cells but also their long-term survival in vivo. We propose that the delivery of growth factors by mesoporous nanoparticles is a potentially versatile and widely applicable strategy for efficient differentiation and functional integration of stem cell derivatives upon transplantation.

Keywords
Cell transplantation, Differentiation, Embryonic stem cells, Nervous system, Neural differentiation, Neural stem cell, Stem cell culture, Transplantation
National Category
Natural Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Nanotechnology and Functional Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211443 (URN)10.5966/sctm.2013-0072 (DOI)000326312000017 ()
Note

De 3 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet

Available from: 2013-11-27 Created: 2013-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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