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Eliason, Marcus
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Eliason, M., Johansson, P. & Nilsson, M. (2019). Forward-looking moral hazard in social insurance. Labour Economics, 60, 84-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forward-looking moral hazard in social insurance
2019 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 60, p. 84-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tests for forward-looking moral hazard in the sickness insurance system by exploiting a 1991 reform in Sweden. The replacement rate was reduced for short absences but not for long absences, which introduced a potential future cost of returning to work. Using this exogenous variation in the replacement rate and controlling for dynamic selection, we find that the potential future cost of returning to work decreased the outflow from long-term sickness absence. This finding suggests that long-term sickness absentees respond to economic incentives and are forward-looking, which highlights the importance of taking forward-looking behavior into account when designing and evaluating social insurance programs.

Keywords
Dynamic incentives, Forward-looking behavior, Moral hazard, Sickness absence, Sickness insurance
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-399004 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2019.06.003 (DOI)000491685300007 ()
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-16Bibliographically approved
Angelov, N. & Eliason, M. (2018). Wage subsidies targeted to jobseekers with disabilities: subsequent employment and disability retirement. IZA Journal of Labor Policy, 7, Article ID UNSP 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wage subsidies targeted to jobseekers with disabilities: subsequent employment and disability retirement
2018 (English)In: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, ISSN 2193-9004, E-ISSN 2193-9004, Vol. 7, article id UNSP 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many countries, a non-negligible percentage of the working-age population has impairments that also entail reduced work capacity, and disability retirement is increasing. Despite this, studies on the effects of policies aimed at enhancing the labour market inclusion among people with disabilities, such as targeted wage subsidies, are surprisingly few. In an attempt to fill this gap, we have studied how wage subsidies affect future labour market outcomes for jobseekers with disabilities, in terms of employment and disability retirement. By using inverse probability weighting applied to rich Swedish register data, we contrast participants in the wage subsidy program to observably similar non-participants during a 19-year period. We find that participation was associated with both positive and negative labour market outcomes. On the negative side, participants were less likely to have unsubsidised employment. On the positive side, leaving the labour market through the disability insurance program was somewhat less common among participants. Moreover, using a broader employment measure including subsidised jobs, the participants were found to be employed to a larger extent, which could be interpreted either as locking-in effects or as fostering labour market inclusion.

Keywords
Disability, Wage subsidies, Subsidised employment, Disability insurance, Labour market programs
National Category
Economics Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372935 (URN)10.1186/s40173-018-0105-9 (DOI)000452868300001 ()
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Angelov, N. & Eliason, M. (2016). The Differential Earnings and Income Effects of Involuntary Job Loss on Workers with Disabilities: Evidence from Sweden. Labour, 30(2), 213-233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Differential Earnings and Income Effects of Involuntary Job Loss on Workers with Disabilities: Evidence from Sweden
2016 (English)In: Labour, ISSN 1121-7081, E-ISSN 1467-9914, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 213-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with disabilities are consistently found to face considerable difficulties in the labour market. In this study we investigated whether their earnings and income trajectories are more adversely affected in case of involuntary job loss. Earnings of those with and without disabilities began to diverge already several years prior to job loss because of larger incidence of sickness. Following job loss much more job losers with disabilities became disability retirees resulting in a considerable and seemingly permanent earnings differential. However, larger uptake of public social insurances among job losers with disabilities resulted in a much smaller income differential.

National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297771 (URN)10.1111/labr.12062 (DOI)000375866900005 ()
Available from: 2016-06-28 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Eliason, M. (2014). Alcohol-Related Morbidity and Mortality Following Involuntary Job Loss: Evidence From Swedish Register Data. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 75(1), 35-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol-Related Morbidity and Mortality Following Involuntary Job Loss: Evidence From Swedish Register Data
2014 (English)In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between involuntary job loss and alcohol-attributable morbidity and mortality. Method: Swedish linked employee employer data were used to identify all establishment closures during 1990-1999, as well as the employees who were laid off and a comparison group. These data were merged with information on alcohol-attributable deaths and hospital admissions from the Causes of Death Register and the National Patient Register. The associations between job loss and alcohol-attributable morbidity and mortality during a follow-up period of 12 years were estimated by propensity score weighting methods. Results: An excess risk of both alcohol-related hospitalization and mortality was found among both displaced men and women. For women, the wholly alcohol-attributable health problems were mainly limited to alcohol use disorders, whereas men also had an increased risk of hospitalization from poisoning and alcohol-induced liver disease and pancreatitis. Conclusions: The findings support previous evidence of increased risks of alcohol-related morbidity/mortality following involuntary job loss, although the estimates presented herein are more conservative. In addition, the findings suggest that alcohol-related problems manifest somewhat differently in men and women.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219206 (URN)000330142800004 ()24411795 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-25 Created: 2014-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Eliason, M. (2014). Assistant and auxiliary nurses in crisis times Earnings, employment, and income effects of female job loss in the Swedish public sector. International journal of manpower, 35(8), 1159-1184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assistant and auxiliary nurses in crisis times Earnings, employment, and income effects of female job loss in the Swedish public sector
2014 (English)In: International journal of manpower, ISSN 0143-7720, E-ISSN 1758-6577, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1159-1184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the earnings, employment and income effects of job displacement among female assistant and auxiliary nurses - two hard-hit female-dominated occupations - in Sweden during the economic crisis of the 1990s. Design/methodology/approach - Using register data, assistant and auxiliary nurses who were displaced due to mass-layoffs during the crisis years were identified, as well as an appropriate control group. The study population could be followed for a maximum of 13 years. Mean effects were estimated using a propensity score weighted fixed effect estimator. In a supplementary analysis, propensity score weighted quantile effects were estimated. Findings - Job loss among women in the public sector seems to have had similar earnings and employment consequences as previously found for job loss among men in the private sector. However, the social insurance system replaced a majority of the lost earnings. Moreover, a distributional analysis revealed that the income and earnings losses were limited to the lower part of the distributions. Social implications - Budget consolidation measures to restore health to public finances in the aftermath of the Great Recession are likely to have long-lasting adverse consequences for some. Although many of those losing their jobs are likely to quickly regain employment at a comparable earnings level, the unlucky few may bear most of the costs. Originality/value - The author is aware of no previously published research that has investigated either the impact of job displacement in the public sector or the distributional effect of job displacement.

Keywords
Health care, Recession, Women workers, Restructuring, Displaced workers, Employee turnover, Job displacement, Mass-layoffs
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246203 (URN)10.1108/IJM-12-2012-0175 (DOI)000348439300004 ()
Available from: 2015-03-03 Created: 2015-03-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Eliason, M. & Ohlsson, H. (2013). Timing of death and the repeal of the Swedish inheritance tax. The Journal of Socio-Economics, 45, 113-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timing of death and the repeal of the Swedish inheritance tax
2013 (English)In: The Journal of Socio-Economics, ISSN 1053-5357, E-ISSN 1879-1239, Vol. 45, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In response to the repeal of the Swedish inheritance tax people postponed death to avoid taxes. This is an example of the far-reaching behavioral effects of economic incentives and of unintended consequences of policy changes. Using individual data, including information on taxable estates, we find that deceased with, compared to those without, tax incentives to postpone death were 10 percentage points more likely to die the day after rather than the day before the repeal. An extended analysis suggests that the timing of deaths was affected not only during these two days but during a longer surrounding period.

Keywords
behavioral responses to taxes, estate tax, inheritance tax, tax avoidance, mortality
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-204417 (URN)10.1016/j.socec.2013.05.002 (DOI)000333061700016 ()
Available from: 2013-08-04 Created: 2013-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Eliason, M. (2012). Lost jobs, broken marriages. Journal of Population Economics, 25(4), 1365-1397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lost jobs, broken marriages
2012 (English)In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1365-1397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the impact of both husbands' and wives' job displacement on the risk that the marriage ends in divorce. Using Swedish-linked employee-employer data, all married couples in which one of the spouses lost his or her job because of an establishment closure in 1987 or 1988 and a comparison sample were identified. Over a 12-year period, the excess risk of divorce among couples' in which the husband was displaced was 13% and statistically significant. The estimated impact of wives' job displacements was of almost the same size, but not statistically significant.

Keywords
Displaced workers, Divorce, Plant closure
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-177544 (URN)10.1007/s00148-011-0394-4 (DOI)000305526500009 ()
Available from: 2012-07-16 Created: 2012-07-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eliason, M. & Ohlsson, H. (2010). Timing of death and the repeal of the Swedish inheritance tax. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timing of death and the repeal of the Swedish inheritance tax
2010 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Does taxation affect the timing of death? This is an interesting example of how behavior might be affected by economic incentives. We study how two changes in Swedish inheritance taxation 2003/04 and 2004/05 have affected mortality during the turns of the years. Our first main result is that deceased with estates taxable for legal heirs were 10 percentage points more likely to have died on New Year’s Day 2005, from when the inheritance tax was repealed, rather than on New Year’s Eve 2004, compared to deceased without taxable estates for legal heirs. The second main result is that deceased with estates taxable for a married spouse were 12 percentage points more likely to have died on New Year’s Day 2004, from when the inheritance tax between spouses was repealed, rather than on New Year’s Eve 2003, compared to deceased without taxable estates for a married spouse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2010. p. 29
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2010:5
Keywords
behavioral response to taxes, timing of death, estate tax, inheritance
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-161794 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-18 Created: 2011-11-17 Last updated: 2011-11-18Bibliographically approved
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