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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Bergfeldt, N., Kirdök, E., Oskolkov, N., Mirabello, C., Unneberg, P., Malmström, H., . . . Götherström, A. (2024). Identification of microbial pathogens in Neolithic Scandinavian humans. Scientific Reports, 14(1), Article ID 5630.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of microbial pathogens in Neolithic Scandinavian humans
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2024 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 5630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the Neolithic transition, human lifestyle shifted from hunting and gathering to farming. This change altered subsistence patterns, cultural expression, and population structures as shown by the archaeological/zooarchaeological record, as well as by stable isotope and ancient DNA data. Here, we used metagenomic data to analyse if the transitions also impacted the microbiome composition in 25 Mesolithic and Neolithic hunter-gatherers and 13 Neolithic farmers from several Scandinavian Stone Age cultural contexts. Salmonella enterica, a bacterium that may have been the cause of death for the infected individuals, was found in two Neolithic samples from Battle Axe culture contexts. Several species of the bacterial genus Yersinia were found in Neolithic individuals from Funnel Beaker culture contexts as well as from later Neolithic context. Transmission of e.g. Y. enterocolitica may have been facilitated by the denser populations in agricultural contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-526578 (URN)10.1038/s41598-024-56096-0 (DOI)001185083700029 ()38453993 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2021/5-335Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2021/6-260Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/5-100Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/6-46Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/22-507Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/23-275Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish Research Council, 2019-00849Swedish Research Council, 2017-02503Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond, P21-0266Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P19.0740:1
Available from: 2024-04-12 Created: 2024-04-12 Last updated: 2024-04-12Bibliographically approved
Blank, M., Tornberg, A., Sjögren, K.-G., Knipper, C., Frei, K. M., Malmström, H., . . . Storå, J. (2023). Interdisciplinary analyses of the remains from three gallery graves at Kinnekulle: tracing Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age societies in inland Southwestern Sweden. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 15, Article ID 94.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interdisciplinary analyses of the remains from three gallery graves at Kinnekulle: tracing Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age societies in inland Southwestern Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 15, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we investigate the Scandinavian Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Kinnekulle in southwestern Sweden. The above-mentioned periods in the study area are poorly understood and the archaeological record consists of a few stray finds and a concentration of 20 gallery graves. This study focuses on three of the gallery graves where commingled skeletons from successive burials were recovered. The human remains and the artefacts from the graves were used for discussing individual life stories as well as living societies with the aim of gaining new knowledge of the last part of the Neolithic and the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in southwestern Sweden. We focused on questions concerning health and trauma, mobility and exchange networks, and diet and subsistence of the people using the graves. Chronological, bioarchaeological, and biomolecular aspects of the burials were approached through the application of archaeological and osteological studies, as well as stable isotope, strontium isotope, radiocarbon, and mtDNA analyses. The study provides evidence for high mobility and diverse diets, as well as inhumations primarily dated to the transition between the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. We suggest that the mountain plateau of Kinnekulle was mainly reserved for the dead, while the people lived in agriculture-based groups in the surrounding lower lying regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Scandinavian Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age, Gallery graves, Isotope analyses, Health, Trauma, Subsistence, Mobility
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-506984 (URN)10.1007/s12520-023-01793-6 (DOI)001002993100002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationUniversity of Gothenburg
Available from: 2023-07-03 Created: 2023-07-03 Last updated: 2024-06-10Bibliographically approved
Niiranen, L., Leciej, D., Edlund, H., Bernhardsson, C., Fraser, M., Sanchez-Quinto, F., . . . Thalmann, O. (2022). Epigenomic Modifications in Modern and Ancient Genomes. Genes, 13(2), Article ID 178.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenomic Modifications in Modern and Ancient Genomes
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2022 (English)In: Genes, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 178Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epigenetic changes have been identified as amajor driver of fundamentalmetabolic pathways. More specifically, the importance of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms for biological processes like speciation and embryogenesis has beenwell documented and revealed the direct link between epigenetic modifications and various diseases. In this review, we focus on epigenetic changes in animals with special attention on human DNA methylation utilizing ancient and modern genomes. Acknowledging the latest developments in ancient DNA research, we further discuss paleoepigenomic approaches as the only means to infer epigenetic changes in the past. Investigating genome-wide methylation patterns of ancient humans may ultimately yield in a more comprehensive understanding of how our ancestors have adapted to the changing environment, and modified their lifestyles accordingly. We discuss the difficulties of working with ancient DNA in particular utilizing paleoepigenomic approaches, and assess new paleoepigenomic data, which might be helpful in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
epigenetics, DNA methylation, ancient DNA, paleoepigenomics, diet, lifestyle diseases
National Category
Genetics Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-513056 (URN)10.3390/genes13020178 (DOI)000975396200001 ()35205223 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-16 Created: 2023-10-16 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Blank, M., Sjögren, K.-G., Knipper, C., Frei, K. M., Malmström, H., Fraser, M., . . . Storå, J. (2021). Mobility patterns in inland southwestern Sweden during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 13(4), Article ID 64.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobility patterns in inland southwestern Sweden during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age
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2021 (English)In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we investigate population dynamics in the Scandinavian Neolithic and Early Bronze Age in southwestern Sweden. Human mobility patterns in Falbygden were studied by applying strontium isotope analysis combined with archaeological and bioarchaeological data, including mtDNA and sex assessment on a large dataset encompassing 141 individuals from 21 megalithic graves. In combination with other archaeological and anthropological records, we investigated the temporal and spatial scale of individual movement, mobility patterns of specific categories of people and possible social drivers behind them. Our results of strontium and biomolecular analyses suggest that mobility increased in the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age compared to the earlier parts of the Neolithic. The data indicate individuals moving both into and away from Falbygden. Mobility patterns and contact networks also shift over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Mobility, Southwestern Sweden, Megalithic graves, Strontium isotopes, Mitochondrial aDNA, Neolithic, Early Bronze Age
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-441857 (URN)10.1007/s12520-021-01294-4 (DOI)000630357600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationUniversity of Gothenburg
Available from: 2021-05-12 Created: 2021-05-12 Last updated: 2024-06-10Bibliographically approved
Sanchez-Quinto, F., Malmström, H., Fraser, M., Girdland-Flink, L., Svensson, E., Simões, L. G., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2019). Megalithic tombs in western and northern Neolithic Europe were linked to a kindred society. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(19), 9469-9474
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Megalithic tombs in western and northern Neolithic Europe were linked to a kindred society
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 19, p. 9469-9474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Paleogenomic and archaeological studies show that Neolithic lifeways spread from the Fertile Crescent into Europe around 9000 BCE, reaching northwestern Europe by 4000 BCE. Starting around 4500 BCE, a new phenomenon of constructing megalithic monuments, particularly for funerary practices, emerged along the Atlantic facade. While it has been suggested that the emergence of megaliths was associated with the territories of farming communities, the origin and social structure of the groups that erected them has remained largely unknown. We generated genome sequence data from human remains, corresponding to 24 individuals from five megalithic burial sites, encompassing the widespread tradition of megalithic construction in northern and western Europe, and analyzed our results in relation to the existing European paleogenomic data. The various individuals buried in megaliths show genetic affinities with local farming groups within their different chronological contexts. Individuals buried in megaliths display (past) admixture with local hunter-gatherers, similar to that seen in other Neolithic individuals in Europe. In relation to the tomb populations, we find significantly more males than females buried in the megaliths of the British Isles. The genetic data show close kin relationships among the individuals buried within the megaliths, and for the Irish megaliths, we found a kin relation between individuals buried in different megaliths. We also see paternal continuity through time, including the same Y-chromosome haplotypes reoccurring. These observations suggest that the investigated funerary monuments were associated with patrilineal kindred groups. Our genomic investigation provides insight into the people associated with this long-standing megalith funerary tradition, including their social dynamics.

Keywords
paleogenomics, population genomics, migration, megalithic tombs
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384070 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1818037116 (DOI)000467226400047 ()30988179 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens JubileumsfondKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

De 3 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Malmström, H., Günther, T., Svensson, E. M., Juras, A., Fraser, M., Munters, A. R., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2019). The genomic ancestry of the Scandinavian Battle Axe Culture people and their relation to the broader Corded Ware horizon. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 286(1912), Article ID 20191528.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genomic ancestry of the Scandinavian Battle Axe Culture people and their relation to the broader Corded Ware horizon
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1912, article id 20191528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Neolithic period is characterized by major cultural transformations and human migrations, with lasting effects across Europe. To understand the population dynamics in Neolithic Scandinavia and the Baltic Sea area, we investigate the genomes of individuals associated with the Battle Axe Culture (BAC), a Middle Neolithic complex in Scandinavia resembling the continental Corded Ware Culture (CWC). We sequenced 11 individuals (dated to 3330-1665 calibrated before common era (cal BCE)) from modern-day Sweden, Estonia, and Poland to 0.26-3.24x coverage. Three of the individuals were from CWC contexts and two from the central-Swedish BAC burial 'Bergsgraven'. By analysing these genomes together with the previously published data, we show that the BAC represents a group different from other Neolithic populations in Scandinavia, revealing stratification among cultural groups. Similar to continental CWC, the BAC-associated individuals display ancestry from the Pontic-Caspian steppe herders, as well as smaller components originating from hunter-gatherers and Early Neolithic farmers. Thus, the steppe ancestry seen in these Scandinavian BAC individuals can be explained only by migration into Scandinavia. Furthermore, we highlight the reuse of megalithic tombs of the earlier Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) by people related to BAC. The BAC groups likely mixed with resident middle Neolithic farmers (e.g. FBC) without substantial contributions from Neolithic foragers.

Keywords
ancient DNA, Battle Axe Culture, Corded Ware Culture, demography, European Neolithic, migration
National Category
Archaeology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396732 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2019.1528 (DOI)000490551300007 ()31594508 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-02503Swedish Research Council, 2017-05267Swedish Research Council, 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationBerit Wallenberg Foundation, BWS2011.0090
Note

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-11-26 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-26Bibliographically approved
Fraser, M., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Evans, J., Storå, J., Götherström, A., Wallin, P., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2018). New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 17, 325-334
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Molecular Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343835 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.09.002 (DOI)000429561000031 ()
Funder
Berit Wallenberg FoundationGunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2020-06-05Bibliographically approved
Fraser, M. (2018). People of the Dolmens and Stone Cists: An archaeogenetic Investigation of Megalithic Graves from the Neolithic Period on Gotland. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>People of the Dolmens and Stone Cists: An archaeogenetic Investigation of Megalithic Graves from the Neolithic Period on Gotland
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The study of ancient genomics of pre-historic human remains has in recent years offered unprecedented knowledge regarding pre-historic migration and population structure on the European continent which has fundamentally altered the current views in the archaeological community. However, the merging of the two fields, archaeology and genetics, is still in its infancy and much work is still needed in order for these fields to integrate. In this thesis I explore how genetic analyses, in combination with contextual radiocarbon dating and isotopic analyses for diet and mobility can be used to investigate demographic events on a local and regional level. This is done through the investigation of people buried in five previously excavated megalithic tombs on the Island of Gotland dated to the Neolithic period. I present the genomic population structure and archaeological background for the pre-historic European reference data and show how this is used to investigate population continuity, demographic shifts, cultural duality, and admixture for local and regional contexts. I present new data and explore the Strontium-baseline for the Gotland biosphere which is used for the mobility analyses. I show that mitochondrial haplogroup data is especially useful in combination with isotopic data, and radiocarbon dating for investigation of demographic shifts on a larger scale. I also show that genomic data gives unique insights into the individuals’ life history which, together with the established demographic background allows for fine scale investigation of population demographic events within and between different archaeological contexts. Finally I show that the different Neolithic contexts on Gotland to a large extent involves immigration of new groups to the island, and that the contextual breaks seen in the archaeological record during the Neolithic period are connected with cultural and population demographic shifts. This dissertation demonstrates that genomic analyses, in combination with archaeology and isotopic analyses, as well as contextual osteological analyses and radiocarbon dating, present unique insights into the life history of the actual people who lived the lives we try to understand.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, 2018. p. 83
Series
Aun, ISSN 0284-1347 ; 47
Keywords
archaeology, aDNA, ancient genomics, archaeogenetics, mtDNA, osteology, radiocarbon dating, Strontium, Carbon, Nitrogen, TRB, PWC, BAC, CWC, dolmen, stone cist, population demography, diet, mobility, cultural duality, admixture, kinship, Neolithic period, Early Bronze Age, Europe, Baltic Sea area, Scandinavia, Gotland
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Molecular Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347559 (URN)978-91-506-2692-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-05-22, Geijersalen, Engelska parken, Thunbergsv. 3P, Uppsala, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
The ATLAS of Ancient Human Genomes project
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-26
Günther, T., Malmström, H., Svensson, E., Omrak, A., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Kilinc, G. M., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2018). Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation. PLoS biology, 16(1), Article ID e2003703.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation
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2018 (English)In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, no 1, article id e2003703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

National Category
Biological Sciences Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346367 (URN)10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703 (DOI)000423830300009 ()29315301 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilWenner-Gren FoundationsKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens JubileumsfondSwedish Research Council, 421-2013-730; 2013-1905Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1138
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2021-10-25Bibliographically approved
Fraser, M., Sjödin, P., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Evans, J., Svedjemo, G., Knutsson, K., . . . Storå, J. (2018). The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 20, 324-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 20, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Molecular Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343836 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2018.02.045 (DOI)000444281500030 ()
Funder
Berit Wallenberg Foundation, BWS 2011.0090Gunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, RJ M13-0904:1
Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2020-06-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4714-088x

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