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Haines, Helen
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Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Hildingsson, I., Haines, H., Karlström, A. & Nystedt, A. (2017). Presence and process of fear of birth during pregnancy: Findings from a longitudinal cohort study. Women and Birth, 30(5), E242-E247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence and process of fear of birth during pregnancy: Findings from a longitudinal cohort study
2017 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 5, p. E242-E247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of fear of birth has been estimated between 8-30%, but there is considerable heterogeneity in research design, definitions, measurement tools used and populations. There are some inconclusive findings about the stability of childbirth fear.

Aim: to assess the prevalence and characteristics of women presenting with scores >= 60 on FOBS-The Fear of Birth Scale, in mid and late pregnancy, and to study change in fear of birth and associated factors.

Methods: A prospective longitudinal cohort study of a one-year cohort of 1212 pregnant women from a northern part of Sweden, recruited in mid pregnancy and followed up in late pregnancy. Fear of birth was assessed using FOBS-The fear of birth scale, with the cut off at >= 60.

Findings: The prevalence of fear of birth was 22% in mid pregnancy and 19% in late pregnancy, a statistically significant decrease. Different patterns were found where some women presented with increased fear and some with decreased fear. The women who experienced more fear or less fear later in pregnancy could not be differentiated by background factors.

Conclusions: More research is needed to explore factors important to reduce fear of childbirth and the optimal time to measure it.

Keywords
Fear, Birth, Pregnancy, Counseling, Change
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341626 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2017.02.003 (DOI)000414350100002 ()28279636 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Ternström, E., Hildingsson, I., Haines, H. & Rubertsson, C. (2016). Pregnant women's thoughts when assessing fear of birth on the Fear of Birth Scale. Women and Birth, 29(3), E44-E49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnant women's thoughts when assessing fear of birth on the Fear of Birth Scale
2016 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 29, no 3, p. E44-E49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Fear of childbirth is common during pregnancy but rarely assessed in clinical practice. The Fear of Birth Scale has been proposed as a valid measure suitable for assessing fear of birth in an antenatal clinical context. To make sure that the scale makes sense in relation to the known constructs of fear of birth, it is important to find out what women think when responding to the Fear of Birth Scale.

AIM:

To report what women in mid-pregnancy think when assessing fear of birth on the Fear of Birth Scale.

METHODS:

A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with a think aloud technique was used. Thirty-one women were recruited in gestational week 17-20. Content analysis was conducted to describe the different dimensions of fear of birth.

FINDINGS:

Worry was described as unspecific feelings and thoughts, often with a negative loading. Fear was described as a strong feeling connected to something specific. Furthermore, the women thought about aspects that influence their worries and fears and explained the strategies that helped them to cope with their fear of birth.

CONCLUSION:

Women could clearly assess, describe, and discuss fear of birth using the Fear of Birth Scale. This supports the use of the Fear of Birth Scale in clinical settings as a starting point for further dialogue about women's fear of birth. The dialogue may identify women's need for information, treatment, and referral when necessary.

Keywords
Fear of birth; Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS); Think aloud; Worry; Pregnancy
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270892 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2015.11.009 (DOI)000377990700002 ()26710973 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Thomas, J., Hildingsson, I. & Haines, H. (2016). Swedish fathers contemplate the difficulties they face in parenthood. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 8, 55-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish fathers contemplate the difficulties they face in parenthood
2016 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 8, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim was to explore what concerns Swedish fathers had about parenting difficulties at two months after the birth of their baby. Methods: Self-report questionnaires were used and data were analyzed with mixed methods. Results: Thirty percent of the 827 fathers reported concerns about the difficulties of parenthood. The theme 'Managing the demands of being a father' emerged and was based on concerns about how to raise the baby, having enough money, health issues, lack of time and finding balance in the new family pattern. Financial worries, feeling less positive about expecting a baby, and self-reported poor emotional health were related to fathers who perceived parenthood as difficult. Conclusion: Experienced fathers as well as new fathers expressed similar concerns about parenthood. Preparation classes for reassurance and skills coaching about child raising may provide important support for fathers. This is especially important for fathers who may have poor emotional health or who may not be feeling positive about expecting a baby. Policy-makers and health care providers should recognize that offering support for all fathers benefits not only men, but also their children, and their partners and can help encourage egalitarian practices at home and work.

Keywords
Fathers, Mixed methods, Parenting difficulties
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298864 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2016.02.005 (DOI)000376839500010 ()27179379 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-11 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Karlström, A., Haines, H. & Johansson, M. (2016). Swedish women's interest in models of midwifery care - Time to consider the system?: A prospective longitudinal survey. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 7, 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish women's interest in models of midwifery care - Time to consider the system?: A prospective longitudinal survey
2016 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 7, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sweden has an international reputation for offering high quality maternity care, although models that provide continuity of care are rare. The aim was to explore women's interest in models of care such as continuity with the same midwife, homebirth and birth center care. Methods: A prospective longitudinal survey where 758 women's interest in models such as having the same midwife throughout antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum care, homebirth with a known midwife, and birth center care were investigated. Results: Approximately 50% wanted continuity of care with the same midwife throughout pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period. Few participants were interested in birth center care or home birth. Fear of giving birth was associated with a preference for continuity with midwife. Conclusions: Continuity with the same midwife could be of certain importance to women with childbirth fear. Models that offer continuity of care with one or two midwives are safe, cost-effective and enhance the chance of having a normal birth, a positive birth experience and possibly reduce fear of birth. The evidence is now overwhelming that all women should have maternity care delivered in this way.

Keywords
Birth center care, Continuity, Fear of birth, Homebirth, Midwifery
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280239 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2015.11.002 (DOI)000370089000006 ()26826042 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-09 Created: 2016-03-09 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
Ternström, E., Hildingsson, I., Haines, H. & Rubertsson, C. (2015). Higher prevalence of childbirth related fear in foreign born pregnant women: Findings from a community sample in Sweden. Midwifery, 31(4), 445-450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Higher prevalence of childbirth related fear in foreign born pregnant women: Findings from a community sample in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 445-450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

to investigate the prevalence of childbirth related fear (CBRF) in early pregnancy among both Swedish born and foreign born women living in Sweden.

DESIGN:

a cross sectional prevalence study. Data was collected by a questionnaire, which was available in Swedish and eight other languages.

SETTING:

a university hospital in the middle of Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

the recruitment took place during a two month period where the participating women completed the Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS) in mid-pregnancy.

MEASUREMENTS:

prevalence of CBRF, the cut-point of 60 and above. Odds ratios with a 95% confidence interval were calculated between women born in Sweden and women born in a foreign country. Stratified analyses were also performed separately for Swedish born and foreign born women.

FINDINGS:

in total 606 women completed the survey, 78% were born in Sweden and 22% were born in a foreign country. About 22% of the total sample scored 60 or more on the FOBS-scale. Almost 18% (n=85) of the women born in Sweden reported CBRF whereas 37 % (n=49) of the foreign born women reported CBRF. Being born outside Sweden (OR 2.7; CI 1.7-4.0) and expecting the first baby (OR 1.9; CI 1.3-2.8) were associated with CBRF. There were no differences in age, civil status or level of education between women with or without FOBS≥60. However, a stratified analysis showed that primiparas born in a foreign country (OR 3.8; CI 1.8-8.0) were more likely to score 60 or more on the FOBS-scale compared to multiparas born in a foreign country.

KEY CONCLUSIONS:

childbirth related fear was almost three times as common among foreign born women when compared to Swedish women. Foreign born childbearing women are an extremely vulnerable group who need culturally sensitive and targeted support from caregivers. Further research is needed to clearly identify the components of women׳s childbirth related fear in various ethnic groups.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239490 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2014.11.011 (DOI)000353526100007 ()25529841 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-28 Created: 2014-12-28 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Johansson, M., Fenwick, J., Haines, H. & Rubertsson, C. (2014). Childbirth fear in expectant fathers: Findings from a regional Swedish cohort study. Midwifery, 30(2), 242-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childbirth fear in expectant fathers: Findings from a regional Swedish cohort study
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2014 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 242-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

to investigate the prevalence of childbirth related fear in Swedish fathers and associated factors.

DESIGN:

a regional cohort study. Data was collected by a questionnaire.

SETTING:

three hospitals in the middle-north part of Sweden

PARTICIPANTS:

1047 expectant fathers recruited in mid-pregnancy during one year (2007) who completed the Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS).

MEASUREMENTS:

prevalence of childbirth fear and associated factors. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated between men who scored 50 and above (childbirth fear) and those that did not (no fear). Logistic regression analysis was used to assess which factors contributed most to childbirth fear in fathers.

FINDINGS:

the prevalence of childbirth fear in men was 13.6%. Factors associated with childbirth related fear were as follows: Less positive feelings about the approaching birth (OR 3.4; 2.2-5.2), country of birth other than Sweden (OR 2.8; 1.3-6.1), a preference for a caesarean birth (OR 2.1; 1.7-4.1), childbirth thoughts in mid-pregnancy (OR 1.9; 1.1-2.0) and expecting the first baby (OR 1.8; 1.2-2.6).

KEY CONCLUSIONS:

high levels of fear were associated with first time fathers and being a non-native to Sweden. Men with fear were more likely to experience pregnancy and the coming birth as a negative event. These men were also more likely to identify caesarean section as their preferred mode of birth.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

engaging expectant fathers in antenatal conversations about their experiences of pregnancy and feelings about birth provides health-care professionals with an opportunity to address childbirth fear, share relevant information and promote birth as a normal but significant life event.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198081 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2013.01.001 (DOI)000331728400010 ()23455031 (PubMedID)
Note

Correction in: MIDWIFERY, Volume: 30, Issue: 6, Pages: 802-802, DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2014.03.001

Available from: 2013-04-08 Created: 2013-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Haines, H., Johansson, M., Rubertsson, C. & Fenwick, J. (2014). Childbirth fear in Swedish fathers is associated with parental stress as well as poor physical and mental health. Midwifery, 30(2), 248-254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childbirth fear in Swedish fathers is associated with parental stress as well as poor physical and mental health
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

to compare self-rated health and perceived difficulties during pregnancy as well as antenatal attendance, birth experience and parental stress in fathers with and without childbirth related fear.

DESIGN:

a longitudinal regional survey. Data were collected by three questionnaires.

SETTING:

three hospitals in the middle-north part of Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

1047 expectant fathers recruited in mid-pregnancy and followed up at two months and one year after birth.

MEASUREMENTS:

childbirth fear was assessed using the Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS). Self-rated physical and mental health and perceived difficulties were assessed in mid pregnancy. Two months after birth antenatal attendance, mode of birth and the birth experience were investigated. Parental stress was measured using the Swedish Parental Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ). Crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated between expectant fathers who scored 50 and above (childbirth fear) and those that did not (no fear).

FINDINGS:

expectant fathers with childbirth related fear (13.6%) reported poorer physical (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.8) and mental (OR 3.0; 1.8-5.1) health than their non-fearful counterparts. The fearful fathers were more likely to perceive difficulties in pregnancy (OR 2.1; 1.4-3.0), and the forthcoming birth (OR 4.3; 2.9-6.3) compared to fathers without childbirth fear. First-time fathers with fear attended fewer antenatal classes. Fathers with high fear reported higher mean scores in four of the five subscales of the SPSQ. Childbirth related fear was not associated with mode of birth or fathers' birth experience.

KEY CONCLUSIONS:

expectant fathers with childbirth related fear had poorer health, viewed the pregnancy, birth and the forthcoming parenthood with more difficulties. They were less often present during antenatal classes and had higher parental stress.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

this study provides insight into the health of expectant fathers during pregnancy and highlights the importance of understanding how childbirth fear may affect expectant fathers in both the short and longer term.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219105 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2013.12.012 (DOI)000331728400011 ()24445076 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-21 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Pallant, J. F., Haines, H. M., Hildingsson, I., Cross, M. & Rubertsson, C. (2014). Psychometric evaluation and refinement of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 32(2), 112-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation and refinement of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, ISSN 0264-6838, E-ISSN 1469-672X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 112-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective:

To explore the underlying structure of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) and to assess the psychometric properties of the subscales.

Background:

The establishment of the mother–fetus relationship is an important developmental task for successful adaption to pregnancy, with implications for the well-being of mother and child. The PAI was developed to measure the relationship between a women and her fetus. Although originally developed as a single dimension, other researchers have suggested alternative factor structures.

Methods:

A self-report questionnaire, including the PAI, was administered to 775 Swedish women in late pregnancy. Psychometric assessment of the PAI was undertaken using exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and Rasch analysis.

Results:

EFA indicated a three-factor solution, which was confirmed by CFA. The previously reported single-factor and five-factor solutions were not supported. Rasch analysis was used to form three 6-item PAI-Revised subscales (Anticipation,Interaction,Differentiation). All subscales showed good overall fit to the Rasch model and good internal consistency. The three subscales were moderately intercorrelated, sharing between 23% and 42% of their variance, suggesting they should be used separately, pending further research concerning their unique predictive power.

Conclusion:

These results suggest that PAI-Revised is a psychometrically sound tool, suitable for use in research and clinical settings. It can be used to guide the identification, support, and follow-up of pregnant women with low attachment. The three subscales, although related, may tap different aspects of the attachment construct, with different antecedents and consequences for the well-being of mother and child.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219087 (URN)10.1080/02646838.2013.871627 (DOI)000333985800002 ()
Available from: 2014-02-21 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Haines, H., Hildingsson, I., Pallant, J. F. & Rubertsson, C. (2013). The Role of Women’s Attitudinal Profiles in Satisfaction with the Quality of their Antenatal and Intrapartum Care. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, 42(4), 428-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Women’s Attitudinal Profiles in Satisfaction with the Quality of their Antenatal and Intrapartum Care
2013 (English)In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0884-2175, E-ISSN 1552-6909, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 428-441Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To compare perceptions of antenatal and intrapartum care in women categorized into three profiles based on attitudes and fear. 

Design

Prospective longitudinal cohort study using self-report questionnaires. Profiles were constructed from responses to the Birth Attitudes Profile Scale and the Fear of Birth Scale at pregnancy weeks 18 to 20. Perception of the quality of care was measured using the Quality from Patient's Perspective index at 34 to 36 weeks pregnancy and 2 months after birth.

Setting

Two hospitals in Sweden and Australia. 

Participants

Five hundred and five (505) pregnant women from one hospital in Vasternorrland, Sweden (n=386) and one in northeast Victoria, Australia (n=123). 

Results 

Women were categorized into three profiles: self-determiners, take it as it comes, and fearful. The self-determiners reported the best outcomes, whereas the fearful were most likely to perceive deficient care. Antenatally the fearful were more likely to indicate deficiencies in medical care, emotional care, support received from nurse-midwives or doctors and nurse-midwives'/doctors' understanding of the woman's situation. They also reported deficiencies in two aspects of intrapartum care: support during birth and control during birth. 

Conclusions 

Attitudinal profiling of women during pregnancy may assist clinicians to deliver the style and content of antenatal and intrapartum care to match what women value and need. An awareness of a woman's fear of birth provides an opportunity to offer comprehensive emotional support with the aim of promoting a positive birth experience.

Keywords
Fear of birth, attitudes, profiling, satisfaction, childbirth
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-185080 (URN)10.1111/1552-6909.12221 (DOI)000321822800007 ()
Available from: 2012-11-20 Created: 2012-11-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Haines, H., Cross, M., Pallant, J. F. & Rubertsson, C. (2013). Women's satisfaction with antenatal care: Comparing women in Sweden and Australia. Women and Birth, 26(1), e9-e14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women's satisfaction with antenatal care: Comparing women in Sweden and Australia
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2013 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 26, no 1, p. e9-e14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Satisfaction with antenatal care could differ depending on the organisation and the context of care.

AIM:

To compare antenatal care in Australia and Sweden, to identify deficiencies in the content of antenatal care and what aspects contributed most in dissatisfaction with antenatal care.

METHODS:

A longitudinal survey of 123 Australian and 386 Swedish women recruited during one year in regional hospitals in Sweden and Australia. Data collected by three questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Women in Australia had more antenatal visits, less continuity of midwife caregiver but were more satisfied with antenatal education and the emotional aspects of antenatal care. Although the overall satisfaction was high, deficiencies were found in more than half of the studied variables in the content of care. Women in Sweden were more dissatisfied with information about labour and birth (OR 3.1; 1.8-5.3) and information about the time following birth (OR 3.8; 2.2-6.3), but more satisfied with the involvement of the father (OR 0.3; 0.2-0.6). Factors that contributed most to dissatisfaction with antenatal care overall were deficiency in information about pregnancy related issues (OR 3.4; 1.3-8.7) and not being taken seriously by the midwife (OR 4.1; 1.6-10.1).

CONCLUSION:

Satisfaction with antenatal care was high in both groups of women. Australian women were more satisfied than the Swedish women with the emotional aspects of care. Deficiencies were found in more than half of the variables measured relating to the specific aspects of care. Lack of information and not being treated seriously were important factors for not being satisfied.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-190393 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2012.06.002 (DOI)000315743200003 ()22795867 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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