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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Moczydlowska, M., Pease, V., Willman, S., Wickström, L. & Agić, H. (2018). A Tonian age for the Visingsö Group in Sweden constrained by detrital zircon dating and biochronology: implications for evolutionary events. Geological Magazine, 155(5), 1175-1189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Tonian age for the Visingsö Group in Sweden constrained by detrital zircon dating and biochronology: implications for evolutionary events
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2018 (English)In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 155, no 5, p. 1175-1189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Historical Geology and Paleontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337293 (URN)10.1017/S0016756817000085 (DOI)000434422300009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-1669Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4375
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Jensen, S., Hogstrom, A. E. S., Almond, J., Taylor, W. L., Meinhold, G., Hoyberget, M., . . . Palacios, T. (2018). Scratch circles from the Ediacaran and Cambrian of Arctic Norway and southern Africa, with a review of scratch circle occurrences. Bulletin of Geosciences, 93(3), 287-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scratch circles from the Ediacaran and Cambrian of Arctic Norway and southern Africa, with a review of scratch circle occurrences
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2018 (English)In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 287-304Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scratch circles - bedding plane parallel sedimentary structures formed by the passive rotation of a tethered organism into the surrounding sediment - are relatively rare in the geological record. Here new occurrences of scratch circles are described from the Ediacaran-Cambrian Stahpogieddi Formation, Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway, and from the Ediacaran Nudaus and Urusis formations, Nama Group, of southern Africa. A literature survey confirms a previously noted concentration of scratch circles reported from shallow marine upper Ediacaran-lower Cambrian and paralic Carboniferous rocks. Scratch circle identification and nomenclature are discussed. The stratigraphical range of the trace fossils Treptichnus pedum and Gyrolithes isp. in the Stahpogieddi Formation are extended downward. Combined with earlier reports of Harlaniella podolica this adds new precision to the placement of the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary on the Digermulen Peninsula.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CZECH GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2018
Keywords
scratch circles, Ediacaran, Cambrian, Norway, Republic of South Africa, Namibia, trace fossils
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363891 (URN)10.3140/bull.geosci.1685 (DOI)000441904600002 ()
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Agić, H., Moczydłowska, M. & Yin, L. (2017). Diversity of organic-walled microfossils from the early Mesoproterozoic Ruyang Group, North China Craton - a window into the early eukaryote evolution. Precambrian Research, 101-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversity of organic-walled microfossils from the early Mesoproterozoic Ruyang Group, North China Craton - a window into the early eukaryote evolution
2017 (English)In: Precambrian Research, ISSN 0301-9268, E-ISSN 1872-7433, p. 101-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mesoproterozoic Era was an important time for the initial diversification of eukaryotic groups and the appearance of the first complex morphologies. While eukaryotes evolved around 2.4 Ga, the first microfossils with ornamentation and sculpture occur in the 1.8-1.6 Ga successions worldwide. Shales and siltstones of the Ruyang Group, Shanxi Province, North China Craton, record a high diversity of such organic-walled microfossils. Recently, the depositional ages of this succession has been constrained to 1.75-1.40 Ga via   zircon U-Pb dating. This dating extends back the time of the first appearance of complex eukaryotic characters (e.g. processes, complex wall structure) in the fossil record. We have conducted a biostratigraphic investigation on of the samples throughout the fossiliferous Ruyang Group to provide an estimate of the early eukaryotic diversity in the Mesoproterozoic. Light- and scanning electron microscope studies have documented 26 species, including several that are reported for the first time, and some that were previously known only from younger, Neoproterozoic strata. Fossil diversity is high in the upper Baicaoping Formation, declines in the middle and reaches its peak in the upper Beidajian Formation. Novel morphologies among the unicellular Ruyang biota include a variety of processes, from tube-like extensions to hirsute spines, vesicles with velutinous outer membranes, as well as numerous specimens with internal bodies of varying sizes. We have also recorded the globally distributed Mesoproterozoic taxa Dictyosphaera, Shuiyousphaeridium, and Tappania. Key characters displayed by the Ruyang biota are consistent with reproductive structures (especially cysts among modern protists. These microfossils provide an additional evidence for the emergence of the crown group Eukarya by 1.7-1.4 Ga.

Keywords
Mesoproterozoic, Ruyang Group, organic-walled microfossils, eukaryotic evolution, North China, Dictyosphaera.
National Category
Natural Sciences Geology
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265216 (URN)10.1016/j.precamres.2017.04.042 (DOI)000404697200006 ()
Projects
Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2009-4445
Available from: 2015-10-25 Created: 2015-10-25 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Agić, H., Moczydłowska, M. & Canfield, D. (2016). Reproductive cyst and operculum formation in the Cambrian-Ordovician galeate-plexus microfossils. GFF, 138(2), 278-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproductive cyst and operculum formation in the Cambrian-Ordovician galeate-plexus microfossils
2016 (English)In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 278-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unicellular organic-walled microfossils from the Cambrian-Ordovician transition in Estonia (ca. 490-480 million years ago) exhibit rare characters reflecting their function as reproductive algal cysts. The studied assemblages record the evolutionary history of phytoplankton in the early Paleozoic Era: novel morphologies appearing through the Cambrian and subsequently diversifying in the Ordovician. Well preserved specimens were extracted following a standard palynological method and studied by light transmitted microscopy. The galeate plexus acritarchs Caldariola, Priscogalea and Stelliferidium have revealed exceptionally preserved morphological elements and a rare structure among both fossil and extant protists – an opening with operculum (lid) in reproductive cysts, in addition to lavish vesicle ornamentation and sculpture. Analogous morphology is observed in the living dasycladalean alga Acetabularia (Chlorophyta), which possesses an intrinsic lid-forming apparatus used during organism’s reproductive stage. Based on the observations on the fossil material and studies on the Acetabularia lid-formation, we propose a model of operculum formation in the galeate plexus microorganisms. Due to strong morphological and ecological similarities between galeate fossils and dasycladalean cysts, and the antiquity of this algal order, galeates may be positioned within green algae, more specifically Dasycladales. Unique morphology of the operculum-bearing microbiota would have required a high degree of intracellular complexity for its development, suggesting that advanced intracellular machinery was present already in the early Paleozoic phytoplankton. Additionally, minute prasinophyte microfossils Reticella corrugata  are reported for the first time in the Upper Cambrian strata. 

Keywords
acritarchs, Baltica, cyst-formation, Dasycladales, Estonia, galeate plexus, microfossils, operculum, Ordovician, palaeobiology
National Category
Geology Botany
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265207 (URN)10.1080/11035897.2015.1116603 (DOI)000379763500001 ()
Projects
Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-1669Danish National Research Foundation, DNRF53
Available from: 2015-10-25 Created: 2015-10-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Petryshyn, V., Juarez Rivera, M., Agić, H., Frantz, C., Corsetti, F. & Tripati, A. (2016). Stromatolites in Walker Lake (Nevada, Great Basin, USA) record climate and lake level changes ~ 35,000 years ago [Letter to the editor]. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 451, 140-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stromatolites in Walker Lake (Nevada, Great Basin, USA) record climate and lake level changes ~ 35,000 years ago
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2016 (English)In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 451, p. 140-151Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Walker Lake is a closed-basin remnant of the large Pleistocene glacial Lake Lahontan system that has experienced multiple high amplitude (100–200 m) changes in water level over the past ~ 40,000 years in response to changes in climate. A laminated carbonate stromatolite composed of varying proportions of calcite fans and micrite was collected from a paleoshoreline located at approximately 58 m above present lake level. Radiocarbon dating revealed that the stromatolite spans approximately 2000 years of growth, from 35,227 to 33,727 calibrated years before present (YBP), a time period during which paleolake-level is not well-constrained. Distinct laminae were drilled along the growth axis, and the resulting powders were collected for clumped isotope analyses to generate formation temperatures (lake water temperatures) during stromatolite formation from which δ18Owater was calculated.

Results indicate that the stromatolite experienced an initial increase in temperature and water δ18O values followed by a decrease in both during the course of accretion. The resulting temperature and isotopic data were input into a Rayleigh distillation model for lakewater evaporation in order to estimate the magnitude of lake level and volume fluctuations over the course of accretion. Modeling results reveal a lake level decrease of between 8.1 and 15.6 m, followed by an increase of between 4.3 and 8.8 m during the course of stromatolite growth.

The results of this study indicate that Walker Lake experienced significant lake volume change over the course of 2000 years, perhaps as a response to precipitation changes driven by fluctuations in the polar jet stream and accompanying changes in regional climate, and/or evaporation-induced changes in lake level. These results add to a growing body of research indicating that stromatolites and other lacustrine tufas represent a detailed and extensive terrestrial archive that can potentially be used to reconstruct the timing and magnitude of climate change.

Keywords
stromatolite; clumped isotope; Walker Lake; Polar Jet Stream; Pleistocene
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281153 (URN)10.1016/j.palaeo.2016.02.054 (DOI)000375517800012 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-03-19 Created: 2016-03-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Agić, H. (2015). A new species of small acritarch with porous wall structure from the early Cambrian of Estonia, and implications for the fossil record of eukaryotic picoplankton. Palynology, 40(3), 343-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new species of small acritarch with porous wall structure from the early Cambrian of Estonia, and implications for the fossil record of eukaryotic picoplankton
2015 (English)In: Palynology, ISSN 0191-6122, E-ISSN 1558-9188, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 343-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition records a general trend of decrease in phytoplankton cell size, in contrast tothe earlier and much larger Ediacaran acritarchs. Particularly minute, unornamented but sculptured organic-walledmicrofossils have been recovered from the lower Cambrian Lükati Formation in northern Estonia. The lack of anysignificant thermal alteration in the formation allowed for excellent preservation of fine microstructures on thesemicrofossils. Among the rich palynomorph assemblage in Lükati, a new species of tiny, spheroidal eukaryoticmicrofossil is recorded: Reticella corrugata gen. et sp. nov. It is characterised by a corrugated and flexible vesicle wallthat is densely perforated by nano-scale pores. Despite its unique morphology, the new species shares diagnosticcharacters with fossil and extant prasinophyte algae. R. corrugata is among the smallest microfossils with typicaleukaryotic morphology (conspicuous wall sculpture) and contributes to the diversity of the size class of smallacritarchs. Size, abundance, inferred prasinophyte affinity and eukaryotic wall sculpture make this new taxon alikely member of the early eukaryotic picoplankton.

Keywords
Cambrian, Estonia, organic-walled microfossils, picoplankton, prasinophytes, small acritarchs
National Category
Geology Ecology
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265208 (URN)10.1080/01916122.2015.1068879 (DOI)000386047200007 ()
Projects
Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-1669
Available from: 2015-10-25 Created: 2015-10-25 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Agić, H., Moczydłowska, M. & Yin, L. (2015). Affnity, life cycle, and intracellular complexity of organic-walled microfossils from the Mesoproterozoic of Shanxi, China. Journal of Paleontology, 89(1), 28-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affnity, life cycle, and intracellular complexity of organic-walled microfossils from the Mesoproterozoic of Shanxi, China
2015 (English)In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 28-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Light microscope and scanning electron microscope observations on new material of unicellularmicrofossils Dictyosphaera macroreticulata and Shuiyousphaeridium macroreticulatum, from the MesoproterozoicRuyang Group in China, provide insights into the microorganisms’ biological affinity, life cycle and cellularcomplexity. Gigantosphaeridium fibratum n. gen. et sp., is described and is one of the largest Mesoproterozoicmicrofossils recorded. Phenotypic characters of vesicle ornamentation and excystment structures, properties ofresistance and cell wall structure in Dictyosphaera and Shuiyousphaeridium are all diagnostic of microalgalcysts. The wide size ranges of the various morphotypes indicate growth phases compatible with the development ofreproductive cysts. Conspecific biologically, each morphotype represents an asexual (resting cyst) or sexual (zygotic cyst)stage in the life cycle, respectively. We reconstruct this hypothetical life cycle and infer that the organism demonstrates areproductive strategy of alternation of heteromorphic generations. Similarly in Gigantosphaeridium, a metabolicallyexpensive vesicle with processes suggests its protective role as a zygotic cyst. In combination with all these charactersand from the resemblance to extant green algae, we propose the placement of these ancient microorganisms in the stemgroup of Chloroplastida (Viridiplantae). A cell wall composed of primary and secondary layers in Dictyosphaera andShuiyouisphaeridium required a high cellular complexity for their synthesis and the presence of an endomembranesystem and the Golgi apparatus. The plastid was also present, accepting the organism was photosynthetic. The biotareveals a high degree of morphological and cell structural complexity, and provides an insight into ongoing eukaryoticevolution and the development of complex life cycles with sexual reproduction by 1200Ma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge Journals, 2015
Keywords
organic-walled microfossils; early eukaryotes; Mesoproterozoic; Dictyosphaera; Shuiyousphaeridium; algae; evolution; intracellular complexity
National Category
Geology
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology; Biology with specialization in Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247264 (URN)10.1017/jpa.2014.4 (DOI)000351478500003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2009-4445
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Moczydłowska, M., Budd, G. & Agić, H. (2015). Ecdysozoan-like sclerites among Ediacaran microfossils. Geological Magazine, 152(6), 1145-1148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecdysozoan-like sclerites among Ediacaran microfossils
2015 (English)In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 152, no 6, p. 1145-1148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report the occurrence of organically preserved microfossils from the subsurface Ediacaran strata overlying the East European Platform in Poland, in the form of sclerites and cuticle fragments of larger organisms. They are morphologically similar to those known from Cambrian strata and associated with various metazoan fossils of recognized phyla. The Ediacaran age of the microfossils is evident from the stratigraphic position below the base of the Cambrian System and above the isotopically dated tuff layers at c. 551±4Ma. Within this strata interval, other characteristic Ediacaran microorganisms co-occur such as cyanobacteria, vendotaenids, microalgae, Ceratophyton,Valkyria and macroscopic annelidan Sabellidites. The recent contributions of organic sclerites in revealing the scope of the Cambrian explosion are therefore also potentially extendable back to the Ediacaran Period when animals first appear in the fossil record.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Ediacaran metazoans; small carbonaceous fossils; Poland; organic preservation; refractory biopolymers
National Category
Geology
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264156 (URN)10.1017/S001675681500045X (DOI)000367730400013 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-1669, 621-2011-4703
Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Agić, H. & Moczydłowska, M. (2015). Is cyst formation in early eukaryotes a requirement for their preservation in the fossil record?. In: Abstracts of the Astrobiology Science Conference 2015: Habitability, Habitable Worlds and Life: EARTH’S EARLY BIOSPHERE: LIFE ON AN “ALIEN” PLANET. Paper presented at Astrobiology Science Conference 2015: Habitability, Habitable Worlds and Life, Chicago, USA, June 15-19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is cyst formation in early eukaryotes a requirement for their preservation in the fossil record?
2015 (English)In: Abstracts of the Astrobiology Science Conference 2015: Habitability, Habitable Worlds and Life: EARTH’S EARLY BIOSPHERE: LIFE ON AN “ALIEN” PLANET, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Most of the Archaean-Proterozoic fossil record consists of non-biomineralizing microorganisms or their signatures. Body fossils of bacteria and early eukaryotes are preserved in siliciclastics, shales and carbonates, and are usually studied by preparation of thin sections or extraction from the rock matrix via acid maceration.The first eukaryotic organic-walled microfossils (OWM) appear at least by 1.8 Ga and undergo morphological diversification and evolutionary radiation in the Mesoproterozoic. There are no preserved eukaryotic-grade microfossils except OWM until the onset of biomineralization much later in the Neoproterozoic, evident in the record of testate amoebae (VSM) and microfossils with scaly elements.OWM are a less conspicuous component of the fos-sil record than taxa with skeletal or shelly elements. Organic matter decays quickly upon death of the organism, due to autolytic enzymes or degradation via het-erotrophy. However, species producing vegetative cells, resting cysts, zygotes, or spores, show considerable resistance to autolysis. Case studies on extractable carbonaceous OWM indicate they are preserved due to complex refractory molecules in the structure of their sturdy vesicle walls. Living analogues across protistan clades utilise such sporopollenin-like compounds for the cyst wall construction during reproductive phase. Algaenan-containing trilaminar sheath structure (TLS) is secreted during aplanospore formation in extant chlorophyte alga Haematococcus. TLS has also been documented in Leiosphaeridia acritarchs from the Cambrian Lükati Formation in Estonia. Leiosphaeridia is a long ranging morphotype, dating as far back as 1.8 Ga. Presence of TLS in these fossils suggests their function as reproductive cyst. Dictyosphaera-Shuiyousphaeridium plexus from the Mesoproterozoic Ruyang Group, China, also exhibits cyst-like morphology and unique elements of wall reinforcement: internally secreted organic platelets.In addition to these early OWM, many Meso-Neoproterozoic taxa such as Tappania, Trachyhystrychosphaera and Kildinella contain cyst-like characters: 1) reproductive openings, 2) ornamentation, 3) occa-sionally preserved internal bodies and 4) acetolysis-resistant vesicle walls – properties observed among extant encysting protists.Ornamented (process-bearing) microfossils in par-ticular bear strong similarities with zygotes of living unicellular algae. Property of acetolysis-resistant vesicle is a result of sporopollenin-like macromolecules in the wall, synthesized most commonly by the autotrophic eukaryotes. Presence of such recalcitrant organic walls requires significant metabolic investment by the microorganism, which suggests a protective and/or reproductive function. This also allows for easier, and more detailed preservation in the rock record.One of the concerns arising from the studies on the early eukaryotic fossils is the bias towards encysting organisms. The eventual search for the fossil record on other planetary bodies could face the same challenges as the Precambrian palaeobiology: fossilisation and eventual detection might be problematic for any unicellular eukaryotic-grade organisms if they have not evolved reproduction via encystment, or cyst formation as means of coping with adverse environmental conditions.

Keywords
Proterozoic, early eukaryotes, fossilization, taphonomy
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-256437 (URN)
Conference
Astrobiology Science Conference 2015: Habitability, Habitable Worlds and Life, Chicago, USA, June 15-19
Projects
ORIGINS AND EARLY DIVERSIFICATION OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIOTA
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-1669
Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2015-06-24Bibliographically approved
Agić, H. (2015). Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One of the most important events in the history of life is the evolution of the complex, eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotes are complex organisms with membrane-bound intracellular structures, and they include a variety of both single-celled and multicellular organisms: plants, animals, fungi and various protists. The evolutionary origin of this group may be studied by direct evidence of past life: fossils. The oldest traces of eukaryotes have appeared by 2.4 billion years ago (Ga), and have additionally diversified in the period around 1.8 Ga. The Mesoproterozoic Era (1.6-1 Ga) is characterised by the first evidence of the appearance complex unicellular microfossils, as well as innovative morphologies, and the evolution of sexual reproduction and multicellularity. For a better understanding of the early eukaryotic evolution and diversification patterns, a part of this thesis has focused on the microfossil records from various time periods and geographic locations. Examination of microfossil morphology, cell wall microstructure and biochemical properties, reflect their intracellular complexity and function, and allow reconstructions of their life cycle, as well as observing the evolutionary pattern of change from Mesoproterozoic, to Cambrian-Ordovician transition. Several case studies included assemblages deriving from Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic time intervals that show disparate morphotypes and innovative features indicative of algal clades. The Mesoproterozoic Ruyang Group in northern China has yielded a diverse microfossil assemblage that provides important clues about the diversification of different eukaryotic groups. Furthermore these microfossils contributed an additional evidence for the emergence of the crown group Eukarya by 1.7-1.4 Ga. In another part of this thesis, examination of wall microstructure and chemical properties via Raman spectroscopy has been used to assess the biological affinities of various Neoproterozoic problematic carbonaceous compression fossils. Studies on the early Phanerozoic (c. 545-485 Ma) assemblages from Estonia reconstructed patterns of the early radiations of phytoplankton and its evolutionary innovations. A continuing theme in this thesis has been using a combination of evidence of microfossils’ fine-scale morphology, ecology and chemical properties to determine their function in life, in addition to their systematic position.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015. p. 47
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1308
Keywords
microfossils, eukaryotes, Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, Cambrian, Ordovician, palaeobiology, biostratigraphy, phylogeny, China, Estonia, Siberian Platform, prasinophytes, microstructure, Raman spectroscopy
National Category
Geology
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265229 (URN)978-91-554-9389-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-12-11, Hambergsalen, Geocentrum, Villavägen 16, 752 36, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Palaeobiology and diversification of Proterozoic-Cambrian photosynthetic eukaryotes
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2009-4445
Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2016-01-13
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4002-4141

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