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Ångström, Jan
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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Ångström, J. & Widén, J. (2012). Adopting a Recipe for Success: Modern Armed Forces and the Institutionalization of the Principles of War. Comparative Strategy, 31(3), 263-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adopting a Recipe for Success: Modern Armed Forces and the Institutionalization of the Principles of War
2012 (English)In: Comparative Strategy, ISSN 0149-5933, E-ISSN 1521-0448, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 263-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevailing explanation of the institutionalization of the principles of war is misleading. Although the introduction of the principles into Western doctrine coincided with total war and the need to train unprecedented numbers of soldiers and junior officers in tactics, the fact that the principles disappeared from doctrines immediately prior to and during the Second World War suggests that they were not institutionalized to meet an increased need to educate the military. Instead, we test two other explanations: one drawing on the principles’ military effectiveness and one drawing upon the principles’ explanatory power. We find that neither one of these hypotheses stand. Instead, we conclude by elaborating on how the institutionalization of the principles of war can be made understandable using non-rationalist frameworks, in particular the growth of a particular kind of identity of staff officers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. According to this framework, the two world wars interrupted—rather than promoted—the institutionalization of the principles, since the wars with their large death tolls and mass recruitment increased the difficulties of creating a separate and unique identity for the burgeoning corps of staff officers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis, 2012
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188642 (URN)10.1080/01495933.2012.692240 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Egnell, R. & Ångström, J. (2012). Afghanistans trettioåriga krig (1ed.). In: Karin Aggestam & Kristine Höglund (Ed.), Om krig och fred: en introduktion till freds- och konfliktstudier (pp. 129-143). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Afghanistans trettioåriga krig
2012 (Swedish)In: Om krig och fred: en introduktion till freds- och konfliktstudier / [ed] Karin Aggestam & Kristine Höglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 129-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188648 (URN)978-91-44-07558-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2013-02-06Bibliographically approved
Ångström, J. & Honig, J. W. (2012). Regaining Strategy: Small Powers, Strategic Culture, and Escalation in Afghanistan. Journal of Strategic Studies, 35(5), 663-687
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regaining Strategy: Small Powers, Strategic Culture, and Escalation in Afghanistan
2012 (English)In: Journal of Strategic Studies, ISSN 0140-2390, E-ISSN 1743-937X, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 663-687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Western operations in Afghanistan, small European powers escalate in different ways. While Denmark and the Netherlands have contributed to Western escalation through integration with British and US forces, Norway and Sweden have done so by creating a division of labour allowing US and British combat forces to concentrate their efforts in the south. These variations in strategic behaviour suggest that the strategic choice of small powers is more diversified than usually assumed. We argue that strategic culture can explain the variation in strategic behaviour of the small allies in Afghanistan. In particular, Dutch and Danish internationalism have reconciled the use of force in the national and international domains, while in Sweden and Norway there is still a sharp distinction between national interest and humanitarianism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2012
Keywords
Strategy, Escalation, Afghan War, Strategic Culture, Small States
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-187743 (URN)10.1080/01402390.2012.706969 (DOI)000310840000004 ()
Available from: 2012-12-10 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2020-07-02Bibliographically approved
Angstrom, J. (2011). Evaluating Rivalling Interpretations of Asymmetric War and Warfare. In: Karl Erik Haug and Ole Jørgen Maaø (Ed.), Conceptualising modern war: (pp. 29-48). London: Hurst
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating Rivalling Interpretations of Asymmetric War and Warfare
2011 (English)In: Conceptualising modern war / [ed] Karl Erik Haug and Ole Jørgen Maaø, London: Hurst , 2011, p. 29-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Hurst, 2011
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166229 (URN)
Available from: 2012-01-11 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2015-06-12Bibliographically approved
Ångström, J. (2011). Ideas and Norms on Future War and Warfare. Strategic Insights, 10(3), 36-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ideas and Norms on Future War and Warfare
2011 (English)In: Strategic Insights, E-ISSN 1938-1670, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 36-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I will develop a slightly different approach that instead assumes that the future is path-dependent. This approach allows for a greater impact of agency and can be easily summed up as what happens in 2030 depends upon what we do in 2029, and what happens in 2029 depends upon what we do in 2028, and so on. Agency thus becomes crucial for shaping the future. Moreover, rather than focusing on actions, in this paper, I will primarily focus on norms. Norms change only gradually and slowly and are therefore a more promising baseline than current actions. Specifically, I will focus on norms of political order: about what it means to govern and be governed, how we understand the relationship between the public and private, and the concepts of civil and military. This paper is structured as follows. First, I will briefly discuss current patterns in war and warfare to evaluate whether or not there are trends that can be discerned. This part of the paper is based on the second approach and it serves a springboard to begin to think differently about the future. Throughout the paper, I will use the trends as a point of departure. Second, I will begin with a discussion on what we already know about the future. In doing so, I will critically engage with the NIC documents Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World and Tomorrow’s Security Challenges: The Defence Implications of Emerging Global Trends. In short, my critique will stress the lack of attention given to ideational factors. Third, and finally, I will suggest ideationally driven scenarios and identify the challenges to such a development of war and warfare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Monterey: Center for Contemporary Conflict, Naval Postgraduate School, 2011
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166228 (URN)
Available from: 2012-01-11 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2023-10-27Bibliographically approved
Projects
Organisational culture, norms and modern warfare; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Noreen, E., Sjöstedt, R. & Ångström, J. (2017). Why small states join big wars: The case of Sweden in Afghanistan 2002–2014. International Relations, 31(2), 145-168Noreen, E. & Ångström, J. (2016). Swedish Strategy and the Afghan Experience: from neutrality to ambiguity. In: Arita Holmberg & Jan Hellenberg (Ed.), The Swedish Presence in Afghanistan: Security and Defence Transformation (pp. 31-54). London: RoutledgeNoreen, E. & Ångström, J. (2015). A Catch-All Strategic Narrative: Target Audiences and Swedish Troop Contribution to ISAF in Afghanistan. In: Beatrice De Graaf, George Dimitriu and Jens Ringsmose (Ed.), Strategic narratives, public opinion and war: winning domestic support for the Afghan War (pp. 282-299). London: RoutledgeÅngström, J. & Honig, J. W. (2012). Regaining Strategy: Small Powers, Strategic Culture, and Escalation in Afghanistan. Journal of Strategic Studies, 35(5), 663-687
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