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Oscarsson, Marie
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Grandahl, M., Tydén, T., Westerling, R., Nevéus, T., Rosenblad, A., Hedin, E. & Oscarsson, M. (2017). To Consent or Decline HPV Vaccination: A Pilot Study at the Start of the National School-Based Vaccination Program in Sweden. Journal of School Health, 87(1), 62-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Consent or Decline HPV Vaccination: A Pilot Study at the Start of the National School-Based Vaccination Program in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Parents' beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination influence whether they allow their daughters to be vaccinated. We examined the association between parents' refusal and sociodemographic background, knowledge and beliefs about HPV, and the HPV vaccination in relation to the Health Belief Model.

METHODS:

The sample consisted of 200 (55%) parents of children aged 11-12 years in the Swedish national vaccination program. Data were collected using a self-reported questionnaire. Most parents (N = 186) agreed to the vaccination. Pearson's chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze data.

RESULTS:

Declining parents saw more risks and fewer benefits of HPV vaccination but no differences in beliefs regarding the severity or young girls' susceptibility to HPV were found. There was an association between refusing the HPV vaccine and lower acceptance of previous childhood vaccinations, and their main source of information was the Internet. Parents who declined the vaccine believed it could adversely affect condom use, the age of their daughter's sexual debut, and the number of sexual partners.

CONCLUSION:

Parents should have the possibility to discuss HPV and HPV vaccine with a school nurse or other health care professionals, and should have access to evidence-based information on the Internet.

Keywords
HPV vaccination; Health Belief Model; health beliefs; school nurses; school-based vaccination programs
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308992 (URN)10.1111/josh.12470 (DOI)000393826900008 ()27917484 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Grandahl, M., Tyden, T., Gottvall, M., Westerling, R. & Oscarsson, M. (2015). Immigrant women’s experiences and views on the prevention of cervical cancer: a qualitative study. Health Expectations, 18(3), 344-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immigrant women’s experiences and views on the prevention of cervical cancer: a qualitative study
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2015 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 344-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Many Western countries have cervical cancer screening programmes and have implemented nation-wide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes for preventing cervical cancer.

Objective

To explore immigrant women's experiences and views on the prevention of cervical cancer, screening, HPV vaccination and condom use.

Design

An exploratory qualitative study. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as a theoretical framework.

Setting and participants

Eight focus group interviews, 5–8 women in each group (average number 6,5), were conducted with 50 women aged 18–54, who studied Swedish for immigrants. Data were analysed by latent content analysis.

Results

Four themes emerged: (i) deprioritization of women's health in home countries, (ii) positive attitude towards the availability of women's health care in Sweden, (iii) positive and negative attitudes towards HPV vaccination, and (iv) communication barriers limit health care access. Even though the women were positive to the prevention of cervical cancer, several barriers were identified: difficulties in contacting health care due to language problems, limited knowledge regarding the relation between sexual transmission of HPV and cervical cancer, culturally determined gender roles and the fact that many of the women were not used to regular health check-ups.

Conclusion

The women wanted to participate in cervical cancer prevention programmes and would accept HPV vaccination for their daughters, but expressed difficulties in understanding information from health-care providers. Therefore, information needs to be in different languages and provided through different sources. Health-care professionals should also consider immigrant women's difficulties concerning cultural norms and pay attention to their experiences.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166329 (URN)10.1111/hex.12034 (DOI)000353956900006 ()23252449 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-01-11 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Holmberg, K. S. M., Peterson, U. M. C. & Oscarsson, M. G. (2014). A two-decade perspective on mothers' experiences and feelings related to breastfeeding initiation in Sweden. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 5(3), 125-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A two-decade perspective on mothers' experiences and feelings related to breastfeeding initiation in Sweden
2014 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 125-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose was to examine mothers' experiences and feelings related to breastfeeding initiation from a two-decade perspective. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional survey was conducted at a maternity ward before and after introduction of Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and in a follow-up survey. Women participated in 1992 (n = 83), 1993 (n = 74) and 2011 (n = 94). Results: The duration of time at the first suckling differed; in 2011, the baby sucked 24.4 minutes compared to 12.7 minutes in 1992 (p < .001) and 13.6 minutes in 1993 (p < .001). In 1992, 34.6% of the women reported using supplementary formula compared with 5.9% in 1993 and 9.3% in 2011 (p < .001). The mothers' contacts with the child or the father as well as their moods did not vary during the years. Mothers rated their feelings towards breastfeeding as being lower in 2011 than in 1992 and 1993 (p = .008). In 2011, mothers experienced breastfeeding as being more difficult and reported a higher degree of tension, insecurity and anxiety. Conclusions: Supplementation was given to healthy newborn infants, which does not conform to BFHIs intentions. Routines and support in relation to breastfeeding initiation need to be continuously evaluated in order to strengthen and sustain the BFHI.

Keywords
Breastfeeding, Initiation, Mothers' experiences, Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236071 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2014.04.001 (DOI)000342889200007 ()25200973 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-11-12 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Grandahl, M., Oscarsson, M., Stenhammar, C., Nevéus, T., Westerling, R. & Tydén, T. (2014). Not the right time: why parents refuse to let their daughters have the human papillomavirus vaccination. Acta Paediatrica, 103(4), 436-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not the right time: why parents refuse to let their daughters have the human papillomavirus vaccination
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2014 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 436-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore why parents refused to allow their 10- to 12-year-old daughters to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination from the Swedish school-based vaccination programme.

Methods: Individual interviews with 25 parents who had been offered, but not consented to, their daughters receiving the HPV vaccination.

Results: Five themes emerged through the interviews: 1) she is just a little girl, 2) inadequate information, 3) not compatible with our way of life, 4) scepticism about the vaccination and 5) who can you trust? The parents made their decisions with their child’s best interests in mind. This was not considered the right time, and the vaccine as perceived as unnecessary and different from other vaccines. Mistrust in Government recommendations and a lack of evidence or information were other reasons to decline.

Conclusion: The decision-making process was complex. These parents preferred to wait until their daughter was older and believed the information they received from the school health system was insufficient. The results indicate that a more flexible HPV vaccination schedule may improve vaccine uptake. This includes more transparent information about the virus and the vaccine and information about who to contact to get the daughter vaccinated at a later date.

Keywords
Decision-making, Human papillomavirus, Parents, School, Vaccination programmes
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-214970 (URN)10.1111/apa.12545 (DOI)000332694700025 ()
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Grandahl, M., Tydén, T., Rosenblad, A., Oscarsson, M., Nevéus, T. & Stenhammar, C. (2014). School nurses’ attitudes and experiences regarding the human papillomavirus vaccination programme in Sweden: a population-based survey. BMC Public Health, 14(540), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School nurses’ attitudes and experiences regarding the human papillomavirus vaccination programme in Sweden: a population-based survey
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2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 540, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sweden introduced a school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme in 2012, andschool nurses are responsible for managing the vaccinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate theattitudes and experiences of school nurses regarding the school-based HPV vaccination programme 1 year after itsimplementation.Methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire in the spring of 2013, and 83.1% (851/1024) ofnurses responded.Results: There were strong associations between the nurses’ education about the HPV vaccine and their perceivedknowledge about the vaccine and a favourable attitude towards vaccination (both p < 0.001). School nurses whoreceived a high level of education were more likely to have a positive attitude to HPV vaccination compared withnurses with little education about HPV vaccination (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 9.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]:3.797–25.132). Nurses with high perceived knowledge were more likely to have a positive attitude compared withthose with a low level of perceived knowledge (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.299–4.955). If financial support from thegovernment was used to fund an additional school nurse, nurses were more likely to have a positive attitude thanif the financial support was not used to cover the extra expenses incurred by the HPV vaccination (OR = 2.1; 95% CI:1.051–4.010). The majority, 648 (76.1%), had been contacted by parents with questions about the vaccine, mostlyrelated to adverse effects. In addition, 570 (66.9%) stated that they had experienced difficulties with thevaccinations, and 337 (59.1%) of these considered the task to be time-consuming.Conclusions: A high level of education and perceived good knowledge about HPV are associated with a positiveattitude of school nurses to the HPV vaccination programme. Thus, nurses require adequate knowledge, education,skills and time to address the questions and concerns of parents, as well as providing information about HPV.Strategic financial support is required because HPV vaccination is a complex and time-consuming task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Attitude, Experience, Human papillomavirus, School health, School nurse, Vaccination
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-229189 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-14-540 (DOI)000338959600002 ()24886332 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 130744
Available from: 2014-08-05 Created: 2014-08-05 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M. G., Hannerfors, A.-K. & Tyden, T. (2012). Young women's decision-making process for HPV vaccination. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 3(4), 141-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young women's decision-making process for HPV vaccination
2012 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 141-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To explore young women's decision-making process for HPV vaccination and to identify their beliefs about HPV vaccination. Methods: This study employs a qualitative design. Data was collected by audio-taped interviews with 16 HPV vaccinated Swedish women, 17-26 years old. The data was analysed using latent content analysis. Results: Three themes emerged from the data: "Fear of cancer", "Reliance on vaccination" and "Mother the main motivational factor". One of the major reasons for taking the decision to be HPV vaccinated was fear of cancer: vaccination was seen as a way to protect oneself against this. The young women's decision-making surrounding HPV vaccination was based on reliance on vaccination and trust in health care. Support from the mothers of the young women and mothers' sponsorship of costs initiated HPV vaccination. Other motivational factors were advertisements and friends. Despite having been vaccinated, the young women were unaware of the relation between cervical cancer, sexual behaviour and HPV. Conclusion: These HPV vaccinated young women had limited knowledge about HPV. Therefore it is important that health professionals provide comprehensible information about HPV vaccination in attaining informed consent. In order to avoid misunderstandings, health care professionals in youth clinics and schools need to initiate discussion with young women, clarifying the relation between cervical cancer. HPV and sexual transmission.

Keywords
Cervical cancer, HPV, Vaccination, Young women
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191795 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2012.10.002 (DOI)000312359000003 ()
Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M. G., Dahlberg, A. & Tyden, T. (2011). Midwives at youth clinics attitude to HPV vaccination and their role in cervical cancer prevention. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 2(4), 137-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Midwives at youth clinics attitude to HPV vaccination and their role in cervical cancer prevention
2011 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 137-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore youth clinic midwives role in cervical cancer prevention and their attitude to HPV vaccination. Study design: Individual interviews with 13 midwives working at youth clinics in Sweden. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Three themes were identified in the qualitative content analysis: "Cervical cancer prevention not a prioritised area", "Ambivalence to the HPV vaccine", and "Gender and socioeconomic controversies". Few midwives talked spontaneously about cervical cancer prevention. The responsibility for providing information about HPV vaccination was considered as primarily that of school health nurses and parents. Midwives were positive about the HPV vaccination, but recognised certain risks, such as its potential negative impact on cervical cancer screening and increased sexual risk taking. The midwives expressed concerns with medical risks, such as side effects and unknown long-term effects of the HPV vaccine. The midwives in the study had ethical concerns that boys were not included in the program and not all families had the financial resources to vaccinate their children. Thus, weak socioeconomic groups might be excluded. Conclusion: The midwives considered cervical cancer prevention as important, but did not integrate information on the HPV vaccine into their routine work, mainly because young people visiting youth clinics had had their sexual debut and they were concerned about the medical risks and that the vaccine was too expensive.

Keywords
Human papillomavirus, Cervical cancer, Vaccination, Mass screening, Midwives, Prevention
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260054 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2011.09.001 (DOI)000312281900001 ()22055981 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-14 Created: 2015-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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