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Hasan, Badrul
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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Ali, M. Z. & Hasan, B. (2018). Follow Up of Maternally Derived Antibodies Titer against Economically Important Viral Diseases of Chicken. POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL, 6(2), 149-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Follow Up of Maternally Derived Antibodies Titer against Economically Important Viral Diseases of Chicken
2018 (English)In: POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL, ISSN 2345-6604, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study was conducted to know the rate of maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) transfer from parents to their offspring and declining the MDAs in their chicks at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days of age against four major poultry viruses like Newcastle disease virus (NDV), Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Infectious bursal diseases virus (IBDV), and Avian Reo virus (ARV). The MDAs was studied on Grandparent (GP) to Parent stock (PS), and Parent stock (PS) to broiler at 30 weeks and 50 weeks of age in Cobb-500 broiler strain chicken. The MDAs was measured from serum antibody titer by indirect ELISA test. The MDAs transfer rate against NDV from GP to PS at 50 weeks of age was higher (68.82%) than at 30 weeks of age but in case of PS to broiler it was higher (66.01%) at 30 weeks of age and its persistent rate also higher (7.96%) up to 21th days of age. Against IBV, MDAs transfer rates were higher in PS to broiler than GP to PS of both ages and highest rates were revealed in PS to broiler at 30 weeks of age as 70.72%. On the other hand, among all lines MDAs transfer rates against IBDV was higher (86.94%) in GP to PS at 30 weeks of age. For ARV, the MDAs transfer rates were highest in GP to PS in both ages than PS to broiler and within GP to PS at 50 weeks of age, it was highest (94.87%) than 30 weeks of age. Accordingly, the poultry producer may help to develop an effective vaccination schedule by considering the MDAs from above experiment.

Keywords
Virus, ELISA, Broiler chicken, Maternally derived antibody
National Category
Microbiology Animal and Dairy Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373219 (URN)10.22069/psj.2018.15213.1340 (DOI)000454103500005 ()
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Johura, F.-T., Parveen, R., Islam, A., Sadique, A., Rahim, M. N., Monira, S., . . . Alam, M. (2017). Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh. Frontiers In Public Health, 4, Article ID UNSP 287.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh
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2017 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 4, article id UNSP 287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36: H5, O174: H-, O152: H8, O109: H51, and O8: H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76: H19 (n = 3), O43: H2 (n = 2), O87: H16 (n = 2), OR: H2 (n = 1), O110: H16 (n = 1), and O152: H8 (n = 1). The STEC-ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76: H19 (n = 3), O43: H2 (n = 2), O87: H16, OR: H2, and O152: H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC-ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC-ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh.

Keywords
Shiga-toxin, enterotoxin, livestock, hybrid, multidrug resistant, PFGE
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334108 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2016.00287 (DOI)000408409000001 ()
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), R01AI039129
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Hasan, B., Laurell, K., Rakib, M. M., Ahlstedt, E., Hernandez, J., Caceres, M. & Järhult, J. D. (2016). Fecal Carriage of Extended-Spectrum -Lactamases in Healthy Humans, Poultry, and Wild Birds in Leon, NicaraguaA Shared Pool of bla(CTX-M) Genes and Possible Interspecies Clonal Spread of Extended-Spectrum -Lactamases-Producing Escherichia coli. Microbial Drug Resistance, 22(8), 682-687
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecal Carriage of Extended-Spectrum -Lactamases in Healthy Humans, Poultry, and Wild Birds in Leon, NicaraguaA Shared Pool of bla(CTX-M) Genes and Possible Interspecies Clonal Spread of Extended-Spectrum -Lactamases-Producing Escherichia coli
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2016 (English)In: Microbial Drug Resistance, ISSN 1076-6294, E-ISSN 1931-8448, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 682-687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major concern in the healthcare of today, especially the increasing number of gram-negative bacteria producing -lactamases such as extended-spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs). However, little is known about the relationship of ESBL producers in humans and domestic and wild birds, especially in a low-income setting. Therefore, we studied the fecal carriage of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in healthy humans, poultry, and wild birds in the vicinity of Leon, Nicaragua. Three hundred fecal samples were collected during December 2012 from humans (n=100), poultry (n=100) and wild birds (n=100). The samples were examined for ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae, revealing the prevalence of 27% in humans, 13% in poultry, and 8% in wild birds. Further characterization of the ESBL-producing isolates was performed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (NDM, CTX-M), epidemiological typing (ERIC2-PCR), multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing. ESBL producers harbored bla(CTX-M-2), bla(CTX-M-15), bla(CTX-M-22), and bla(CTX-M-3) genotypes. The bla(CTX-M-15) constituted the absolute majority of ESBL genes among all samples. ERIC-PCR demonstrated highly related E. coli clones among humans, poultry, and wild birds. Clinically relevant E. coli clone ST648 was found in humans and poultry. There is a shared pool of bla(CTX-M) genes between humans and domesticated and wild birds in Nicaragua, and the results suggest shared clones of ESBL-producing E. coli. The study adds to the notion that wild birds and poultry can pick up antibiotic-resistant bacteria of human origin and function as a melting pot of resistance. Structured surveillance programs of antimicrobial resistance and a more regulated prescription of antibiotics are warranted in Nicaragua.

Keywords
ESBL, E. coli, CTX-M-15, Nicaragua, wild birds, environment
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313405 (URN)10.1089/mdr.2015.0323 (DOI)000390414700009 ()
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Farzana, R., Mozumder, T. & Hasan, B. (2016). Molecular epidemiology and spread dynamics of multi-drug resistant in A. baumannii isolated from patients and hospital environment in Bangladesh. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 45, 89-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular epidemiology and spread dynamics of multi-drug resistant in A. baumannii isolated from patients and hospital environment in Bangladesh
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 45, p. 89-89Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300629 (URN)10.1016/j.ijid.2016.02.240 (DOI)000374876700184 ()
Available from: 2016-08-10 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Badrul, H. & Järhult, J. D. (2015). Absence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among highly ESBL-positive crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 5, Article ID 29761.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Absence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among highly ESBL-positive crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh
2015 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 5, article id 29761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as a growing problem in hospitals; however, domesticated animals, poultry, and wild birds are acting as potential reservoirs. There is a knowledge gap in the Epidemiology of VRE from Bangladesh.

METHODS:

To study the prevalence of VRE and the mechanisms of resistance implicated among wild birds, 238 fecal samples were collected in 2010 from house crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh. Fecal samples were screened by analyzing color change in broth and screening for vanA and vanB resistant genes by PCR.

RESULTS:

Neither vanA nor vanB genes were detected from the fecal samples. The house crow does not seem to constitute a reservoir for VRE.

CONCLUSION:

The zero prevalence is an indication that foraging on hospital waste does not constitute a major risk of VRE carriage in house crows and this is the first study to focus on the prevalence of VRE from wild birds in Bangladesh.

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279320 (URN)10.3402/iee.v5.29761 (DOI)26679560 (PubMedID)
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation, M14-0291
Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Rashid, M., Rakib, M. M. & Badrul, H. (2015). Antimicrobial-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in different ecological niches in Bangladesh. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 5, Article ID 26712.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antimicrobial-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in different ecological niches in Bangladesh
2015 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 5, article id 26712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

The rapid and wide-scale environmental spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in different ecosystems has become a serious issue in recent years.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Bangladeshi wild birds and aquatic environments, samples were taken from Open Bill Stork (Anastomus oscitans) (OBS) and the nearby water sources.

METHODS:

Water and fresh fecal samples were collected from several locations. All samples were processed and cultured for Escherichia coli and tested for antibiotic susceptibility against commonly used antibiotics. ESBL producers were characterized at genotypic level using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, multilocus sequence typing, and rep-PCR.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

A total of 76 E. coli isolates from the 170 OBS and 8 E. coli isolates from three river sources were isolated. In total, 29% of E. coli isolated from OBS and all of the E. coli isolated from water sources were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials. Resistant phenotypes were observed with all antimicrobials except tigecycline, gentamicin, imipenem, and chloramphenicol. Multidrug resistance was observed in 2.6% of OBS and 37.5% of the water isolates. Also, 1.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from OBS, whereas 50% of the E. coli isolated from water sources were ESBL producers possessing the CTX-M-15 gene. The most concerning aspect of our findings was the presence of human-associated E. coli sequence types in the water samples, for example, ST156-complex156, ST10-complex10 and ST46.

CONCLUSION:

This study reports the presence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli in OBSs and nearby aquatic sources in Bangladesh

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Medical Science; Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279317 (URN)10.3402/iee.v5.26712 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Hasan, B., Olsen, B., Alam, A., Akter, L. & Melhus, Å. (2015). Dissemination of the multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli O25b-ST131 clone and the role of house crow (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh.. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 21(11), Article ID UNSP 1000.e1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissemination of the multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli O25b-ST131 clone and the role of house crow (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh.
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2015 (English)In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, ISSN 1198-743X, E-ISSN 1469-0691, Vol. 21, no 11, article id UNSP 1000.e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two hundred and thirty-eight faecal samples from crows foraging on hospital wastes were analysed for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. ESBL-producing crow isolates were characterized and compared with 31 patient isolates. Among the crows, 59% carried ESBL producers. These included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter cloacae harbouring the genes for CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55, CTX-M-79, and CTX-M-14. Human isolates carried only the CTX-M-15 gene. Two-thirds of crow E. coli isolates and all human E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant. Crows and patients shared E. coli sequence types, including the epidemic E. coli O25b-ST131 clone. The scavenging behaviour of crows at poorly managed hospital waste dumps made them potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, including ESBLs.

Keywords
bla(CTX-M-15); E. coli; hospital waste; house crow; O25b-ST131
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267733 (URN)10.1016/j.cmi.2015.06.016 (DOI)000364572800011 ()26115863 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Järhult, J. D., Wahlgren, J., Hasan, B., Salaneck, E. & Lundkvist, Å. (2015). Mallard or chicken?: Comparing the isolation of avian influenza A viruses in embryonated Mallard and chicken eggs. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 5, Article ID 28458.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mallard or chicken?: Comparing the isolation of avian influenza A viruses in embryonated Mallard and chicken eggs
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2015 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 5, article id 28458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To date, the most efficient and robust method for isolating avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) is using embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs). It is known that low-pathogenic avian IAVs undergo rapid genetic changes when introduced to poultry holdings, but the factors driving mutagenesis are not well understood. Despite this, there is limited data on the effects of the standard method of virus isolation of avian-derived viruses, that is, whether isolation in ECEs causes adaptive changes in avian IAVs. Eggs from a homologous species could potentially offer an isolation vessel less prone to induce adaptive changes.

METHODS: We performed eight serial passages of two avian IAVs isolated from fecal samples of wild Mallards in both ECEs and embryonated Mallard eggs, and hemagglutination assay titers and hemagglutinin sequences were compared.

RESULTS: There was no obvious difference in titers between ECEs and embryonated Mallard eggs. Sequence analyses of the isolates showed no apparent difference in the rate of introduction of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin gene (three substitutions in total in embryonated Mallard eggs and two substitutions in ECEs).

CONCLUSION: Embryonated Mallard eggs seem to be good isolation vessels for avian IAVs but carry some practical problems such as limited availability and short egg-laying season of Mallards. Our study finds isolation of Mallard-derived avian IAVs in ECEs non-inferior to isolation in embryonated Mallard eggs, but more research in the area may be warranted as this is a small-scale study.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265064 (URN)10.3402/iee.v5.28458 (DOI)26356095 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-21 Created: 2015-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Kaarme, J., Hasan, B., Rashid, M. & Olsen, B. (2015). Zero Prevalence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Among Swedish Preschool Children. Microbial Drug Resistance, 21(1), 65-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Zero Prevalence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Among Swedish Preschool Children
2015 (English)In: Microbial Drug Resistance, ISSN 1076-6294, E-ISSN 1931-8448, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Enterococci are a natural part of the bacterial flora of humans, animals, and insects and are frequently found in the community. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as a growing problem, associated with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of VRE among healthy Swedish preschool children and ascertain whether they constitute a reservoir for the bacteria.

Methods: In total, 313 individual diapers were collected from preschools in Uppsala, Sweden. Fecal samples were screened by analyzing the color change in a broth followed by polymerase chain reaction for vanA and vanB genes, which are associated with vancomycin resistance.

Results: Neither vanA nor vanB genes could be detected from the samples.

Conclusions: Preschool children in Uppsala do not constitute a reservoir for VRE. The zero prevalence is consistent with the overall decline in VRE prevalence in Sweden during the last years.

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-237456 (URN)10.1089/mdr.2014.0043 (DOI)000349013000009 ()25140598 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Stedt, J., Bonnedahl, J., Hernandez, J., McMahon, B. J., Hasan, B., Olsen, B., . . . Waldenström, J. (2014). Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 4, 21565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries
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2014 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4, p. 21565-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of antibiotic resistant faecal indicator bacteria from humans and food production animals has increased over the last decades. In Europe, resistance levels in Escherichia coli from these sources show a south-to-north gradient, with more widespread resistance in the Mediterranean region compared to northern Europe. Recent studies show that resistance levels can be high also in wildlife, but it is unknown to what extent resistance levels in nature conform to the patterns observed in human-associated bacteria.

METHODS: To test this, we collected 3,158 faecal samples from breeding gulls (Larus sp.) from nine European countries and tested 2,210 randomly isolated E. coli for resistance against 10 antibiotics commonly used in human and veterinary medicine.

RESULTS: Overall, 31.5% of the gull E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥1 antibiotic, but with considerable variation between countries: highest levels of isolates resistant to ≥1 antibiotic were observed in Spain (61.2%) and lowest levels in Denmark (8.3%). For each tested antibiotic, the Iberian countries were either the countries with the highest levels or in the upper range in between-country comparisons, while northern countries generally had a lower proportion of resistant E. coli isolates, thereby resembling the gradient of resistance seen in human and food animal sources.

CONCLUSION: We propose that gulls may serve as a sentinel of environmental levels of antibiotic resistant E. coli to complement studies of human-associated microbiota.

National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221852 (URN)10.3402/iee.v4.21565 (DOI)24427451 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-04 Created: 2014-04-04 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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