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Salari, Raziye
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Salari, R. & Backman, A. (2017). Direct marketing of parenting programs: comparing a promotion-focused and a prevention-focused strategy. European Journal of Public Health, 27(3), 489-494.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct marketing of parenting programs: comparing a promotion-focused and a prevention-focused strategy
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 3, 489-494 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: For parenting programs to achieve a public health impact, it is necessary to develop more effective marketing strategies to increase public awareness of these programs and promote parental participation. In this article, we compared a promotion-focused and a prevention-focused strategy via two studies. Method: We designed two ads inviting parents to participate in a universal parenting program; one ad focused on the program increasing the likelihood of positive outcomes for children (promotion-focused) and the other on the program reducing the likelihood of negative outcomes (prevention-focused). In study I, the two ads were run online simultaneously. Those who clicked on an ad were directed to a website where they could read about and sign up for the program. In study II, a community sample of 706 parents answered a questionnaire about the ads. Results: In study I, over 85 days, the prevention ad generated more clicks. There was no difference in the number of pages visited on the website nor in the number of parents who signed up for the program. In study II, parents showed a preference for the promotion ad, perceiving it as more relevant and rating it as more effective in getting them interested in the program. Conclusion: A prevention strategy may be more effective in drawing public attention, in general. However, a promotion strategy is more likely to reach parents, in particular, and inspire them to consider participating in parenting programs. These strategies should be developed further and tested in both general and clinical populations.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303712 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckw149 (DOI)000404018800023 ()27645211 (PubMedID)
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden , HFÅ 2010/103
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-10-26Bibliographically approved
Osman, F., Salari, R., Klingberg-Allvin, M., Schön, U.-K. & Flacking, R. (2017). Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 7(12), Article ID e017600.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, e017600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally tailored parenting support programme on Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting.

DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial.

SETTING: A city in the middle of Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Somali-born parents (n=120) with children aged 11-16 years and self-perceived stress in their parenting were randomised to an intervention group (n=60) or a waiting-list control group (n=60).

INTERVENTION: Parents in the intervention group received culturally tailored societal information combined with the Connect parenting programme during 12 weeks for 1-2 hours per week. The intervention consisted of a standardised training programme delivered by nine group leaders of Somali background.

OUTCOME: The General Health Questionnaire 12 was used to measure parents' mental health and the Parenting Sense of Competence scale to measure parent satisfaction and efficacy in the parent role. Analysis was conducted using intention-to-treat principles.

RESULTS: The results indicated that parents in the intervention group showed significant improvement in mental health compared with the parents in the control group at a 2-month follow-up: B=3.62, 95% CI 2.01 to 5.18, p<0.001. Further, significant improvement was found for efficacy (B=-6.72, 95% CI -8.15 to -5.28, p<0.001) and satisfaction (B=-4.48, 95% CI -6.27 to -2.69, p<0.001) for parents in the intervention group. Parents' satisfaction mediated the intervention effect on parental mental health (β=-0.88, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.16, p=0.047).

CONCLUSION: The culturally tailored parenting support programme led to improved mental health of Somali-born parents and their sense of competence in parenting 2 months after the intervention. The study underlines the importance of acknowledging immigrant parents' need for societal information in parent support programmes and the importance of delivering these programmes in a culturally sensitive manner.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02114593.

Keyword
child protection, community child health, mental health, public health
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336729 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017600 (DOI)29222136 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Salari, R., Bohlin, G., Rydell, A.-M. & Thorell, L. (2017). Neuropsychological functioning and attachment representations in early school age as predictors of ADHD symptoms in late adolescence. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 48(3), 370-384.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuropsychological functioning and attachment representations in early school age as predictors of ADHD symptoms in late adolescence
2017 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 3, 370-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to examine relations between parent and child attachment representations and neuropsychological functions at age 8, as well as relations between these constructs and ADHD symptoms over a 10-year period. A community-based sample of 105 children (52 boys) participated. Measures of attachment representations and a range of neuropsychological functions were collected at age 8. Parents rated emotion dysregulation and ADHD symptoms at age 8 and ADHD symptoms again at age 18. Significant, although modest, relations were found between disorganized attachment and some aspects of neuropsychological functioning in childhood. When studying outcomes in late adolescence and controlling for early ADHD symptom levels, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment remained significant in relation to both ADHD symptom domains, and one measure of inhibition remained significant for hyperactivity/impulsivity. When examining independent effects, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment were related to inattention, whereas spatial working memory and dysregulation of happiness/exuberance were related to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Our findings showing that disorganized attachment is longitudinally related to ADHD symptoms over and above the influence of both neuropsychological functioning and early ADHD symptom levels highlights the importance of including measures of attachment representations when trying to understand the development of ADHD symptoms. If replicated in more “at-risk” samples, these findings could also suggest that parent–child attachment should be taken into consideration when children are referred for assessment and treatment of ADHD.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303710 (URN)10.1007/s10578-016-0664-1 (DOI)000400070900002 ()27349655 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bergström, M., Fransson, E., Fabian, H., Hjern, A., Sarkadi, A. & Salari, R. (2017). Preschool children living in joint physical custody arrangements show less psychological symptoms than those living mostly or only with one parent. Acta Paediatrica.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool children living in joint physical custody arrangements show less psychological symptoms than those living mostly or only with one parent
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2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: Joint physical custody (JPC), where children spend about equal time in both parent's homes after parental separation, is increasing. The suitability of this practice for preschool children, with a need for predictability and continuity, has been questioned.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we used data on 3656 Swedish children aged three to five years living in intact families, JPC, mostly with one parent or single care. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, completed by parents and preschool teachers, as the outcome measure.

RESULTS: Children in JPC showed less psychological problems than those living mostly (adjusted B 1.81; 95% CI [0.66 to 2.95]) or only with one parent (adjusted B 1.94; 95% CI [0.75 to 3.13]), in parental reports. In preschool teacher reports, the adjusted Betas were 1.27, 95% CI [0.14 to 2.40] and 1.41, 95% CI [0.24 to 2.58], respectively. In parental reports, children in JPC and those in intact families had similar outcomes, while teachers reported lower unadjusted symptom scores for children in intact families.

CONCLUSION: Joint physical custody arrangements were not associated with more psychological symptoms in children aged 3-5, but longitudinal studies are needed to account for potential preseparation differences.

Keyword
Children, Divorce, Joint physical custody, Parental separation, Psychological problems
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332706 (URN)10.1111/apa.14004 (DOI)28880411 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved
Salari, R., Malekian, C., Linck, L., Kristiansson, R. & Sarkadi, A. (2017). Screening for PTSD symptoms in unaccompanied refugee minors: a test of the CRIES-8 questionnaire in routine care. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(6), 605-611.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening for PTSD symptoms in unaccompanied refugee minors: a test of the CRIES-8 questionnaire in routine care
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 6, 605-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The dramatic increase in the number of refugees in Europe presents a major public health challenge. The limited existing evidence indicates that the mental health needs of refugees are significant; unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) constitute a particularly vulnerable group. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a short questionnaire (Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale; CRIES-8) could be used as a screening tool for PTSD symptoms in URMs, 8-18 years old, during their routine health check-up.

Methods: Data were collected at the healthcare centre for asylum-seekers in Uppsala, Sweden. In total, 208 URMs completed the CRIES-8 during their health assessment.

Results: The CRIES-8 was feasible to use, showed good internal consistency and its factor structure was confirmed. Children with less than four years of education often had difficulties completing the questionnaire by themselves and needed help reading the questions. Almost all the respondents were male (98%), aged 9-18 years. The majority (81%) came from Afghanistan. About 76% scored above the cut-off and therefore were considered to be at risk of PTSD. The proportion of children who screened positive did not differ based on age, country of origin or current living arrangements.

Conclusions: The CRIES-8 is a useful tool in clinical settings, however, children should be provided with reading support and instructions about how to complete the questionnaire. The high number of children who screened positive for PTSD symptoms indicates the need for a more thorough mental health assessment, and early prevention/intervention programmes to address URMs' mental health issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2017
Keyword
Unaccompanied refugee minors, PTSD symptoms, screening, CRIES-8
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333721 (URN)10.1177/1403494817715516 (DOI)000407103400004 ()28669316 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2017-11-16Bibliographically approved
Fängström, K., Salari, R., Eriksson, M. & Sarkadi, A. (2017). The computer-assisted interview In My Shoes can benefit shy preschool children's communication. PLoS ONE, 12(8), Article ID e0182978.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The computer-assisted interview In My Shoes can benefit shy preschool children's communication
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, e0182978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interviewing children is a cognitively, socially, and emotionally challenging situation, especially for young and shy children. Thus, finding methods that aid rapport and increase these children's communication is important. The present study investigated whether children's verbal and non-verbal communicative behavior developed differently during the rapport phase, depending on whether children were situationally shy or not, and whether the interview was conducted using the computer-assisted interview In My Shoes (IMS) or a Standard verbal interview. The sample consisted of 60 children aged 4 to 5-years-old. The results showed that for the shy children in the IMS group their talkativeness increased and their answer latency decreased including the amount of encouragement the child needed to talk, while no changes were observed for the shy children in the Standard verbal interview group. There were no significant differences in the non-verbal behavior for the shy children regardless of the interview method used. For the non-shy children, overall, the interview method did not affect either the verbal or the non-verbal outcomes. Our findings indicate that IMS can be a useful tool during the rapport-building phase with shy children as it helps these children to improve their verbal communication.

Keyword
child, interview, communication, In My Shoes
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328584 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0182978 (DOI)000407550500034 ()28813534 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 259-2012-68Swedish Research Council FormasVINNOVA
Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Salari, R. & Filus, A. (2017). Using the Health Belief Model to Explain Mothers’ and Fathers’ Intention to Participate in Universal Parenting Programs. Prevention Science, 18(1), 83-94.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the Health Belief Model to Explain Mothers’ and Fathers’ Intention to Participate in Universal Parenting Programs
2017 (English)In: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, Vol. 18, no 1, 83-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework, we studied factors related to parental intention to participate in parenting programs and examined the moderating effects of parent gender on these factors. Participants were a community sample of 290 mothers and 290 fathers of 5- to 10-year-old children. Parents completed a set of questionnaires assessing child emotional and behavioral difficulties and the HBM constructs concerning perceived program benefits and barriers, perceived child problem susceptibility and severity, and perceived self-efficacy. The hypothesized model was evaluated using structural equation modeling. The results showed that, for both mothers and fathers, perceived program benefits were associated with higher intention to participate in parenting programs. In addition, higher intention to participate was associated with lower perceived barriers only in the sample of mothers and with higher perceived self-efficacy only in the sample of fathers. No significant relations were found between intention to participate and perceived child problem susceptibility and severity. Mediation analyses indicated that, for both mothers and fathers, child emotional and behavioral problems had an indirect effect on parents’ intention to participate by increasing the level of perceived benefits of the program. As a whole, the proposed model explained about 45 % of the variance in parental intention to participate. The current study suggests that mothers and fathers may be motivated by different factors when making their decision to participate in a parenting program. This finding can inform future parent engagement strategies intended to increase both mothers’ and fathers’ participation rates in parenting programs.

Keyword
Universal parenting programs; Intention to participate; Health Belief Model; Fathers; Mothers
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303711 (URN)10.1007/s11121-016-0696-6 (DOI)000392394600009 ()
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden , HFÅ 2010/103Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013–2889
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Wells, M., Sarkadi, A. & Salari, R. (2016). Mothers’ and fathers’ attendance in a community-based universally offered parenting program in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(3), 274-280.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers’ and fathers’ attendance in a community-based universally offered parenting program in Sweden
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 3, 274-280 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Using a public health perspective, this study examined the characteristics of mothers and fathers who attended, compared to those who did not attend, a community-based practitioner-led universally offered parenting program.

Method: Mothers (141) and fathers (96) of 4- to 5-year-olds completed a set of questionnaires, including their demographic characteristics, their child’s behavioral and emotional problems, and their own parenting behavior. They were all then given the opportunity to attend level 2 of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program. During the first six months of the study, 33 mothers and 11 fathers opted to attend the program.

Results: The relation between program attendance and parental characteristics was similar for mothers and fathers. In general, fathers, non-native and lower educated parents were less likely to attend the program. Mothers, but not fathers, were more likely to attend if they reported more child behavior problems, while fathers, but not mothers, were observed at a trend level to attend if they perceived their child as having more emotional problems. In addition, parents in general were more likely to attend if they used more harsh parenting strategies.

Conclusions: Although the universal offer did not reach parents universally, generally those parents who needed it were more likely to attend. Furthermore, this study shows that different factors may impact mothers’ and fathers’ attendance; therefore, parental data should be analyzed separately and different recruitment strategies should be used for mothers and fathers.

Keyword
Universal programs, parenting programs, child behavior problems, child emotional problems, mother attendance, father attendance, parental attendance, Triple P
National Category
Other Health Sciences Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246564 (URN)10.1177/1403494815618841 (DOI)000373591600008 ()26644160 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-09 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Salari, R., Malekian, C., Linck, L. & Sarkadi, A. (2016). Using CRIES-8 to screen for post-traumatic stress disorder in unaccompanied refugee minors. Paper presented at European Public Health Conference. European Journal of Public Health, 26(s1).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using CRIES-8 to screen for post-traumatic stress disorder in unaccompanied refugee minors
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no s1Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The European Journal of Public Health 26 (suppl 1), ckw164. 007: , 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318519 (URN)
Conference
European Public Health Conference
Available from: 2017-03-24 Created: 2017-03-24 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Sampaio, F., Sarkadi, A., Salari, R., Zethraeus, N. & Feldman, I. (2015). Cost and effects of a universal parenting programme delivered to parents of preschoolers. European Journal of Public Health, 25(6), 1035-1042.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost and effects of a universal parenting programme delivered to parents of preschoolers
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 6, 1035-1042 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Parenting programmes are effective in improving child behaviour and parental well-being, but long follow-up studies of universally offered programmes are scarce.

METHODS:

A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess the costs and effects of Triple P levels 2-3 on child externalizing behaviours and parental mental health. The programme was offered universally to parents of preschoolers (self-selection allowed). Preschools were randomized to Triple P or a waitlist control. Health outcomes were reduction in externalizing behaviours measured on the Eyberg Child Behaviour Inventory-22 and improvement in parental mental health measured on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales collected at baseline, 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up. Child outcomes were based on 355 children aged 3-5 years (child sample) and parental outcomes on 759 parents (parental sample) with baseline data. Costs were collected from a municipality perspective, including 312 children and 488 parents with baseline data in the intervention preschools.

RESULTS:

Sixty-seven (29%) parents attended the intervention. Triple P showed no significant improvement in child externalizing behaviours or parental mental health at either of the follow-up points. Triple P had an average yearly total cost of 3007 Swedish Krona (SEK) (€323) per child or 1922 SEK (€207) per parent. Running Triple P cost 227 SEK (€24) per child or 145 SEK (€16) per parent yearly.

CONCLUSION:

Offering low intensity levels of Triple P with 29% attendance may not be a reasonable use of public resources, as no evidence of improvement in child externalizing behaviours or parental mental health was found.

National Category
Health Sciences Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269208 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckv106 (DOI)000367163900024 ()26063699 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259 - 2012-68Public Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-01
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