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Larm, P., Raninen, J., Åslund, C., Svensson, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2019). The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?. European Journal of Public Health, 29(1), 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recently, an increased trend toward non-drinking among adolescents has been observed in several countries. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a common suggestion in literature, that adolescents do not drink alcohol because they spend more time on the internet, monitored at home, by examining associations between internet activities (social media/chatting and computer gaming) and non-drinking.

Methods: A health questionnaire was distributed to all 9th graders (1516 years) in a mid-sized Swedish county in 2008, 2010 and 2012. In total, 7089 students returned the questionnaire.

Results: In contrast to the suggestion, no association was found between total time spent on computers and non-drinking. Social media/chatting was robustly associated with a decreased probability of non-drinking across the three survey years. On the other hand, computer gaming during weekends only (OR = 1.74, CI = 1.132.69) or both on weekdays and weekends increased the probability of non-drinking (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.312.54) in 2012 only. However, neither social media/chatting nor computer gaming was associated with the increased trend of non-drinking from 2008 to 2012.

Conclusions: Internet activities were in general not associated with non-drinking among adolescents aged 1516 years in Sweden. Although, a weak positive association between computer gaming and non-drinking was found in 2012, this effect benefited the vast majority of the boys. The larger alcohol use among those with extensive social media use/chatting may indicate that these online platforms are arenas where adolescents are exposed for positive alcohol preferences and alcohol advertising without parental supervision.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381843 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky168 (DOI)000462576700007 ()30169631 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C. & Nillson, K. W. (2018). A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents. Brain and Behavior, 8(4), Article ID e00949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents
2018 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e00949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  The aims of the present study were to investigate the long-term stability of problematic gaming among adolescents and whether problematic gaming at wave 1 (W1) was associated with problem gambling at wave 2 (W2), three years later.

Methods:  Data from the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Västmanland born in 1997 and 1999, were accessed and analyzed in two waves W2, N = 1576; 914 (58%) girls). At W1 the adolescents were 13 and 15 years old, and at W2 they were 16 and 18 years old. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), and gambling frequencies. Stability of gaming was determined using Gamma correlation, Spearman’s rho, and McNemar. Logistic regression analysis and General linear model (GLM) analysis were performed and adjusted for sex, age, and ethnicity, frequency of gambling activities and gaming time at W1, with PGSI as the dependent variable, and GAIT as the independent variable, to investigate associations between problematic gaming and problem gambling.

Results:  Problematic gaming was relative stable over time, g = 0.739, P £ 0.001, r = 0.555, P £ 0.001, and McNemar P £ 0.001. Furthermore, problematic gaming at W1 increased the probability of having problem gambling three years later, logistic regression OR = 1.886 (95% CI 1.125-3.161), P = 0.016, GLM F = 10.588, h2 = 0.007, P = 0.001.  

Conclusions: Problematic gaming seems to be relatively stable over time. Although associations between problematic gaming and later problem gambling were found, the low explained variance indicate that problematic gaming in an unlikely predictor for problem gambling within this sample.

Keywords
Adolescence, behavioral addiction, comorbidity, gaming problems, gambling problems
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352513 (URN)10.1002/brb3.949 (DOI)000429700300014 ()
Projects
SALVe Cohort
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C., Raninen, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37(S1), S67-S75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours
2018 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, no S1, p. S67-S75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims

Traditionally, non-drinking adults or young adults have been associated with health deficits rather than health benefits. However, as the proportion of Swedish non-drinking adolescents has doubled since 2000, their health profiles are of interest. The aim of the present study is to examine whether social relations, school characteristics, lifestyle factors or health behaviours distinguish adolescent non-drinkers from adolescent drinkers, and if their health profiles have changed from 2004 to 2012.

Design and Methods

Data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland, a health survey biennially distributed to all 9th graders (15-16years) in a medium-sized Swedish county, was used. In total, 2872 students in 2004 and 2045 students in 2012 were included.

Results

Non-drinkers were distinguished from drinkers in both 2004 and 2012 by elevated parental supervision, a lower rate of school truancy and lower rates of cannabis use, use of other illicit drugs, daily smoking and lower scores on antisocial behaviour, but more problems of getting new friends. No differences between 2004 and 2012 were found.

Discussion and Conclusions

Non-drinkers presented more adaptive and healthier behaviours than their drinking peers, but it is difficult to determine whether their health benefits were related to their improved alcohol status or to the more general trend towards adaptation that occurred from 2004 to 2012 among adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
adolescence, alcohol, non-drinkers, health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356810 (URN)10.1111/dar.12640 (DOI)000431986800009 ()29218748 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Culverhouse, R. C., Saccone, N. L., Horton, A. C., Ma, Y., Anstey, K. J., Banaschewski, T., . . . Bierut, L. J. (2018). Collaborative meta-analysis finds no evidence of a strong interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype contributing to the development of depression. Molecular Psychiatry, 23(1), 133-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative meta-analysis finds no evidence of a strong interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype contributing to the development of depression
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2018 (English)In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The hypothesis that the S allele of the 5-HTTLPR serotonin transporter promoter region is associated with increased risk of depression, but only in individuals exposed to stressful situations, has generated much interest, research and controversy since first proposed in 2003. Multiple meta-analyses combining results from heterogeneous analyses have not settled the issue. To determine the magnitude of the interaction and the conditions under which it might be observed, we performed new analyses on 31 data sets containing 38 802 European ancestry subjects genotyped for 5-HTTLPR and assessed for depression and childhood maltreatment or other stressful life events, and meta-analysed the results. Analyses targeted two stressors (narrow, broad) and two depression outcomes (current, lifetime). All groups that published on this topic prior to the initiation of our study and met the assessment and sample size criteria were invited to participate. Additional groups, identified by consortium members or self-identified in response to our protocol (published prior to the start of analysis) with qualifying unpublished data, were also invited to participate. A uniform data analysis script implementing the protocol was executed by each of the consortium members. Our findings do not support the interaction hypothesis. We found no subgroups or variable definitions for which an interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype was statistically significant. In contrast, our findings for the main effects of life stressors (strong risk factor) and 5-HTTLPR genotype (no impact on risk) are strikingly consistent across our contributing studies, the original study reporting the interaction and subsequent meta-analyses. Our conclusion is that if an interaction exists in which the S allele of 5-HTTLPR increases risk of depression only in stressed individuals, then it is not broadly generalisable, but must be of modest effect size and only observable in limited situations.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychiatry Neurology Neurosciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346381 (URN)10.1038/mp.2017.44 (DOI)000423441000016 ()28373689 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 102215/2/13/2German Research Foundation (DFG), LA 733/2-1; DA1151/5-1NIH (National Institute of Health), R01 AA07065; NIH R01; HD042157-01A1; MH081802; 1RC2 MH089951; 1RC2 MH089995EU, European Research Council, EU-FP7HEALTH-F2-2008-222963Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239European Science Foundation (ESF)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Olofsdotter, S., Åslund, C., Furmark, T., Comasco, E. & Nilson, K. W. (2018). Differential susceptibility effects of oxytocin gene (OXT) polymorphisms and perceived parenting on social anxiety among adolescents. Development and psychopathology (Print), 30(2), 449-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differential susceptibility effects of oxytocin gene (OXT) polymorphisms and perceived parenting on social anxiety among adolescents
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2018 (English)In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 449-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social anxiety is one of the most commonly reported mental health problems among adolescents, and it has been suggested that parenting style influences an adolescent's level of anxiety. A context-dependent effect of oxytocin on human social behavior has been proposed; however, research on the oxytocin gene (OXT) has mostly been reported without considering contextual factors. This study investigated the interactions between parenting style and polymorphic variations in the OXT gene in association with social anxiety symptoms in a community sample of adolescents (n = 1,359). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to OXT, rs4813625 and rs2770378, were genotyped. Social anxiety and perceived parenting style were assessed by behavioral questionnaires. In interaction models adjusted for sex, significant interaction effects with parenting style were observed for both variants in relation to social anxiety. The nature of the interactions was in line with the differential susceptibility framework for rs4813625, whereas for rs2770378 the results indicated a diathesis–stress type of interaction. The findings may be interpreted from the perspective of the social salience hypothesis of oxytocin, with rs4813625 affecting social anxiety levels along a perceived unsafe–safe social context dimension.

National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323574 (URN)10.1017/S0954579417000967 (DOI)000430924500006 ()28606214 (PubMedID)
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseThe Swedish Brain Foundation, F02015-0315Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FORTE 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, MI5-0239Swedish Research Council, VR 2015-00495EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398Stiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmet, SLS-559921
Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, K. W., Åslund, C., Comasco, E. & Oreland, L. (2018). Gene-environment interaction of monoamine oxidase A in relation to antisocial behaviour: current and future directions.. Journal of neural transmission, 125(11), 1601-1626
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene-environment interaction of monoamine oxidase A in relation to antisocial behaviour: current and future directions.
2018 (English)In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 125, no 11, p. 1601-1626Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the pioneering finding of Caspi and co-workers in 2002 that exposure to childhood maltreatment predicted later antisocial behaviour (ASB) in male carriers of the low-activity MAOA-uVNTR allele, frequent replication studies have been published. Two meta-analyses, one in 2006 and the other in 2014, confirmed the original findings by Caspi and co-workers. In the present paper, we review the literature, note some methodological aspects of candidate gene–environment interaction (cG×E) studies and suggest some future directions. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) The direction of the effect in a cG×E model may differ according to the positive and negative environmental background of the population. (2) There is a predictor-intersection problem such that when measuring one type of maltreatment in a person, other kinds of maltreatment often co-occur. Other forms of abuse are implicitly considered in statistical models; therefore, it is difficult to draw conclusions about the effects of timing and the severity of different forms of stressful life events in relation to ASB. (3) There is also an outcome-intersection problem because of the major intersection of ASB and other forms of mental health problems. It is likely that the G×E with MAOA is related to a common unmeasured factor. (4) For the G×E model, in which the effect of the gene on the outcome variable is dependent on other predictor variables, theoretically, hypothesis-driven statistical modelling is needed.

Keywords
Antisocial personality disorder, Brunner syndrome, Conduct disorder, Genetic association studies, Genetic susceptibility, Gene–environment interaction, Juvenile delinquency, Monoamine oxidase A, Review
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368637 (URN)10.1007/s00702-018-1892-2 (DOI)000449118500007 ()29881923 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseStiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmet, SLS-559921; SLS-655791; SLS-745221Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). Individual biological sensitivity to environmental influences: testing the differential susceptibility properties of the 5HTTLPR polymorphism in relation to depressive symptoms and delinquency in two adolescent general samples. Journal of neural transmission, 125(6), 977-993
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual biological sensitivity to environmental influences: testing the differential susceptibility properties of the 5HTTLPR polymorphism in relation to depressive symptoms and delinquency in two adolescent general samples
2018 (English)In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 125, no 6, p. 977-993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gene-environment interaction research field in psychiatry has traditionally been dominated by the diathesis-stress framework, where certain genotypes are assumed to confer increased risk for adverse outcomes in a stressful environment. In later years, theories of differential susceptibility, or biological sensitivity, suggest that candidate genes that interact with environmental events do not exclusively confer a risk for behavioural or psychiatric disorders but rather seem to alter the sensitivity to both positive and negative environmental influences. The present study investigates the susceptibility properties of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) in relation to depressive symptoms and delinquency in two separate adolescent community samples: n = 1457, collected in 2006; and n = 191, collected in 2001. Two-, three-, and four-way interactions between the 5HTTLPR, positive and negative family environment, and sex were found in relation to both depressive symptoms and delinquency. However, the susceptibility properties of the 5HTTLPR were distinctly less pronounced in relation to depressive symptoms. If the assumption that the 5HTTLPR induces differential susceptibility to both positive and negative environmental influences is correct, the previous failures to measure and control for positive environmental factors might be a possible explanation for former inconsistent findings within the research field.

Keywords
Antisocial behaviour, Depression, Emotion regulation, Gene-environment interaction, Human, SERT, SLC6A4
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357554 (URN)10.1007/s00702-018-1854-8 (DOI)000433116200010 ()29427067 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Andreou, D., Comasco, E., Åslund, C., Nilsson, K. W. & Hodgins, S. (2018). Maltreatment, the Oxytocin Receptor Gene, and Conduct Problems Among Male and Female Teenagers. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 112.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maltreatment, the Oxytocin Receptor Gene, and Conduct Problems Among Male and Female Teenagers
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) influences human behavior. The G allele of OXTR rs53576 has been associated with both prosocial and maladaptive behaviors but few studies have taken account of environmental factors. The present study determined whether the association of childhood maltreatment with conduct problems was modified by OXTR rs53576 genotypes. In a general population sample of 1591 teenagers, conduct problems as well as maltreatment were measured by self-report. DNA was extracted from saliva samples. In males, there was a significant positive association between maltreatment and conduct problems independent of the genotype. In females, among G allele carriers, the level of conduct problems was significantly higher among those who had been maltreated as compared to those not maltreated. By contrast, among female AA carriers, conduct problems did not vary between those who were, and who were not, maltreated. The results indicate that OXTR rs53576 plays a role in antisocial behavior in females such that the G allele confers vulnerability for antisocial behavior if they experience maltreatment, whereas the A allele has a protective effect.

Keywords
conduct problems, gene–environment interaction, maltreatment, oxytocin receptor gene, rs53576
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368638 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00112 (DOI)000428080100001 ()29623035 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Kerstis, B., Åslund, C. & Sonnby, K. (2018). More secure attachment to the father and the mother is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in adolescents. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 123(1), 62-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>More secure attachment to the father and the mother is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in adolescents
2018 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To investigate whether more secure attachment to the father and the mother is associated with less depressive symptoms among adolescents, and to explore possible sex differences.

Method: A population-based sample of adolescents completed a school-based survey assessing demographic data, attachment to father and mother, as well as depressive symptoms. Participation rate was 80% of the eligible population, and 3,988 adolescents (1,937 boys and 2,051 girls) had complete data for the analyses.

Results: Paired samples t tests showed that participants rated their attachment to mothers as slightly more secure than their attachment to fathers (t = 15.94, P < 0.001; boys: t = 5.23, P < 0.001; girls: t = 16.16, P < 0.001). In linear regression analyses there was an association between the outcome, number of depressive symptoms, and more secure attachment to the mother for boys (B=-0.532; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.656, -0.407, P < 0.001) and for girls (B = -0.623; 95% CI -0.730, -0.516, P < 0.001). Analogous results were found for more secure attachment to the father for boys (B = -0.499; 95% CI -0.608, -0.391, P < 0.001) and for girls (B = -0.494; 95% CI -0.586, -0.401, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Understanding the relationship between attachment to both father and mother and depressive symptoms in adolescent boys and girls is essential for further development of strategies for prevention and treatment of depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents, attachment, depression, parents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354544 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2018.1439552 (DOI)000428060300008 ()29495912 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Stiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmet, SLS-559921, SLS-655791Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Olofsdotter, S., Furmark, T., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). The mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relationship between early and late adolescent levels of anxiety: Specificity and informant effects. Journal of Adolescence, 69, 118-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relationship between early and late adolescent levels of anxiety: Specificity and informant effects
2018 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 69, p. 118-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The role of parenting behavior is often highlighted in the development of anxiety in youth. However, previous reports are limited in terms of the specificity of relationships between different types of anxiety and parenting behaviors, informant effects on these relationships, and direction of effects.

METHODS: This study investigates these questions using longitudinal data from 1350 Swedish adolescents and their parents. Adolescents' self-reports of six dimensions of anxiety and adolescents' and parents' reports of six dimensions of parenting behaviors were used in the analyses. Parallel multiple mediation models were employed to analyze specificity and informant effects within a reciprocal effects model.

RESULTS: Overall, and irrespective of informant, this study found little support for a mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relationship between early and late adolescent levels of anxiety. Evidence for specificity within the parenting-anxiety relationship was scarce with specific mediating effects observed only for panic/agoraphobia and total anxiety through the parenting dimension of rejection.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study concern the un-conditional mediating role of parenting. Parenting behaviors may be more influential among some adolescents, depending on individual differences in other factors related to the development and course of adolescent anxiety. Thus, further research on moderating factors of the influence of parenting on adolescent anxiety is warranted.

Keywords
Adolescence, Anxiety, Mediator, Parenting
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry; Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374321 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2018.09.011 (DOI)000458345900014 ()30292944 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation, F02015-0315Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, MI5-0239
Available from: 2019-01-20 Created: 2019-01-20 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3589-6113

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