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Elfversson, Emma, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5673-9056
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Elfversson, E., Höglund, K., Mutahi, P. & Okasi, B. (2024). Insecurity and Conflict Management in Urban Slums: Findings from a Household Survey in Kawangware and Korogocho, Nairobi. Nairobi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insecurity and Conflict Management in Urban Slums: Findings from a Household Survey in Kawangware and Korogocho, Nairobi
2024 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nairobi: , 2024
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-523021 (URN)
Available from: 2024-02-13 Created: 2024-02-13 Last updated: 2024-02-13
Höglund, K. & Elfversson, E. (2024). Urban Kenyans mistrust police even more than rural residents do: study sets out why it matters.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Kenyans mistrust police even more than rural residents do: study sets out why it matters
2024 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
police, trust, urban, rural, police reform
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-520848 (URN)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Elfversson, E., Höglund, K., Muvumba Sellström, A. & Pellerin, C. (2023). Contesting the growing city?: Forms of urban growth and consequences for communal violence. Political Geography, 100, Article ID 102810.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contesting the growing city?: Forms of urban growth and consequences for communal violence
2023 (English)In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 100, article id 102810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How does rapid urban growth affect risks of communal violence in cities? In rapidly growing cities, poor planning and weak institutions combined with an unregulated influx of migrants can create a potent recipe for violent mobilization. In addition, politicized identity groups often compete for resources and interact in close proximity in urban areas. Despite a growing research agenda on the relationship between rapid urban growth and urban violent unrest, findings remain inconclusive. One explanation for the disparate conclusions is that the theoretical pathways connecting urban growth and unrest largely fail to consider both the violence-generating and violence-stemming effects of urban growth. With a focus on conflict-ridden societies, we theorize processes through which urban growth influences different aspects of group relations in the city, and thereby contribute to prevent, suppress or generate communal violence. To illustrate the framework, we draw on insights from Nairobi, Kampala and Addis Ababa. By paying attention to processes, we are able to identify a range of developments associated with city growth which in turn have different implications for communal violence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
urban, city, conflict, violence, Africa, Nairobi, Kampala, Addis Ababa, ethnocommunal relations
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-491397 (URN)10.1016/j.polgeo.2022.102810 (DOI)000903918200004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-0394Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-00269
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-03-02Bibliographically approved
Elfversson, E., Gusic, I. & Rokem, J. (2023). Peace in cities, peace through cities? Theorising and exploring geographies of peace in violently contested cities. Peacebuilding, 11(4), 321-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peace in cities, peace through cities? Theorising and exploring geographies of peace in violently contested cities
2023 (English)In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This special issue explores geographies of peace in violently contested cities – cities where the socio-political order is contested by actors who use violence and repression to either challenge or reinforce the prevailing distribution of power and political, economic, and social control. The articles within the special issue theorise and explore where, when, how, and why urban conflicts manifest themselves in the context of contested cities. Together, they also uncover strategies and mechanisms that can break dynamics of violence and repression, lead to urban coexistence, and generate peaceful relations in cities, grounding their analyses in rich case studies of different violently contested cities. The special issue thereby advances the research front on violently contested cities by studying their previously underexplored constructive potential. Bringing together different disciplinary perspectives, the special issue speaks to broader issues of conflicted and conflict-driven urbanisation, political violence in cities, and wider processes of urban change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
Contested cities, urban violence, coexistence, peace, urbanism
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-505895 (URN)10.1080/21647259.2023.2225914 (DOI)001019174300001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-02563Swedish Research Council, 2019- 03870
Available from: 2023-06-22 Created: 2023-06-22 Last updated: 2024-02-20Bibliographically approved
Elfversson, E., Gusic, I. & Murtagh, B. (2023). Postwar cities: Conceptualizing and mapping the research agenda. Political Geography, 105, Article ID 102912.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postwar cities: Conceptualizing and mapping the research agenda
2023 (English)In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 105, article id 102912Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Postwar cities are often dangerous, poorly functioning, and hurdles for peace. Current research on postwar cities, however, is largely based on a limited number of “paradigmatic” cases, without a shared understanding of the broader population of cases to which these belong. Important insights therefore remain uncontextualized vis-à-vis broader trends and have an unclear scope of generalizability. The purpose of this article is to promote a global comparativist research agenda that enables systematic research across a spectrum of research foci. First, we conceptualize the postwar city as a city which has experienced war, no longer does, but where fully consolidated peace is not yet present. Second, we operationalize and map postwar cities since 1989, identifying 273 such cities in 45 war-affected states. Third, we provided a typology of contestation in postwar cities. We end by highlighting how our approach advances the research agenda by enabling systematic study of postwar cities, capturing postwar cities more equally across the globe, bringing to the fore numerous understudied cases, and providing a stronger foundation for comparative analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
urban, peace, war, postwar cities, postwar city, contested
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-503329 (URN)10.1016/j.polgeo.2023.102912 (DOI)001011232300001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-02563Swedish Research Council, 2019-03870
Available from: 2023-06-02 Created: 2023-06-02 Last updated: 2023-07-11Bibliographically approved
Pellerin, C. & Elfversson, E. (2023). (Re)claiming Finfinne?: Violent Protest and the Right to Addis Ababa. In: Sam Kniknie; Karen Büscher (Ed.), Rebellious Riots: Entangled Geographies of Contention in Africa (pp. 128-161). Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(Re)claiming Finfinne?: Violent Protest and the Right to Addis Ababa
2023 (English)In: Rebellious Riots: Entangled Geographies of Contention in Africa / [ed] Sam Kniknie; Karen Büscher, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2023, p. 128-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since 2015, Addis Ababa has seen an unprecedented rise in political protest contesting the distribution of resources between the country’s ethnic groups and questioning the ownership of the capital city. Ethiopia has a history of civil war and armed struggle, but urban protest remains a recent phenomenon. The fact that struggle against marginalisation by the Oromo, one of Ethiopia’s largest ethnic groups, has finally reached the capital has profoundly shaken many Addis Ababans. Compared to other parts of the country, inter-group relations in the city have often been characterized by relatively high levels of tolerance, with a strong sense of a cosmopolitan urban identity. We seek to contribute to understanding this recent rise in urban contestation, through the lens of how long-term city residents make sense of it. We argue that although the question about the ownership of Addis Ababa is central to the Oromo struggle, the recent violent protests do not signify a simple shift of the Oromo struggle from rural areas into the streets of the capital. Our analysis highlights how ethnicity intertwines with urbanity to create a more complex landscape of self- and other-ascribed identities, in turn shaping how the violence is interpreted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2023
Series
Africa-Europe Group for Interdisciplinary Studies, ISSN 1574-6925 ; 30
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-501806 (URN)10.1163/9789004542402_006 (DOI)978-90-04-54239-6 (ISBN)978-90-04-54240-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-05-12 Created: 2023-05-12 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Elfversson, E., Gusic, I. & Meye, M.-T. (2023). The bridge to violence – Mapping and understanding conflict-related violence in postwar Mitrovica. Journal of Peace Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The bridge to violence – Mapping and understanding conflict-related violence in postwar Mitrovica
2023 (English)In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, E-ISSN 1460-3578Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

How can attention to spatial dynamics improve our understanding of where, how, and why conflict-related violence (CRV) concentrates within postwar cities such as Mitrovica? Like many other postwar cities, Mitrovica – one of Kosovo’s largest cities – remains affected by violence connected to the preceding war. This violence is not equally distributed across the city but rather concentrates to certain flashpoints while other sites are comparatively calm(er). To date, however, research on postwar cities has not fully explained such patterns, partly due to limitations in microlevel data. In this article we rely on novel georeferenced data on CRV, in combination with in-depth fieldwork, to map CRV in Mitrovica and explore the causes for its spatial clustering. Using this approach, we show that CRV concentrates at Mitrovica’s Main Bridge and explore this concentration using relational space as an analytical lens. The analysis contributes new insights into patterns of violence in Mitrovica, demonstrates the value of combining systematic data on the patterns of CRV with in-depth exploration into its underlying dynamics, and contributes to existing research on Mitrovica as well as on postwar cities and postwar violence more broadly.

Keywords
city, urban, Kosovo, Mitrovica, peace, postwar, violence
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500085 (URN)10.1177/00223433221147942 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-02563Swedish Research Council, 2019-03870
Available from: 2023-04-12 Created: 2023-04-12 Last updated: 2023-04-19
Elfversson, E. & Höglund, K. (2023). Urban growth, resilience, and violence. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 64, Article ID 101356.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban growth, resilience, and violence
2023 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 64, article id 101356Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities undergoing rapid growth are at risk of outbreaks of violence as competition over scarce resources and space intensifies. In this context, it is critical to identify conditions that make cities and their inhabitants resilient to violence. We review research findings about the general relationship between urban growth and the violence-proneness of cities, as well as insights about the factors that underpin violence–resilience in three different areas: 1) urban governance and planning, 2) security institutions, and 3) the everyday practices of urban dwellers. We argue that in order to understand cities’ resilience to violence, we need to account for both the mechanisms linking urban growth to violence, and the possible conflict resolution and mitigation mechanisms present in cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510864 (URN)10.1016/j.cosust.2023.101356 (DOI)001070683900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03924Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-00269
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Murtagh, B., Elfversson, E., Gusic, I. & Meye, M.-T. (2023). Urban restructuring and the reproduction of spaces of violence in Belfast. Peacebuilding
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban restructuring and the reproduction of spaces of violence in Belfast
2023 (English)In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper maps the distribution of post-conflict violence in Belfast and how it has restructured socially, economically and spatially. An end to hostilities and stable transition produces and is produced by a more complex set of distinctly urban assemblages, actors, resources and places. Bringing the ideas of ‘ordering’ into relation with assemblage theory, the paper suggests that explanations for the survival, volume, type and distribution of violence cannot be understood within exclusively ethnonational frames, identarian politics or military logics. In Belfast, the data reveal a more variegated map of peace and consumption; inner-city alienation and the intensification of division; as well as the emergence of new geographies of displaced violence. The paper concludes by emphasising the need to understand how urban processes and competing ethnic orders create highly differentiated spaces that explain the resilience of violence after hostilities have formally closed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Post-war, violence, assemblages, order, Belfast, urban
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-516276 (URN)10.1080/21647259.2023.2284579 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-02563
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2023-11-20
Höglund, K., Mutahi, P. & Elfversson, E. (2023). Why Kenya wants to send police to Haiti and prospects for success.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Kenya wants to send police to Haiti and prospects for success
2023 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
Kenya, police, Haiti, trust, police reform
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-520850 (URN)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Projects
Programme on Governance, Conflict and Peacebuilding; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Nilsson, D. (2012). Anchoring the Peace: Civil Society Actors in Peace Accords and Durable Peace. International Interactions, 38(2), 243-266Ohlson, T. (Ed.). (2012). From Intra-State War to Durable Peace: Conflict and Its Resolution in Africa after the Cold War. Dordrecht: Republic of Letters PublishingNilsson, D. & Söderberg Kovacs, M. (2011). Revisiting an Elusive Concept: A Review of the Debate on Spoilers in Peace Processes. International Studies Review, 13(4), 606-626Lindgren, M. (2011). Sexual Violence Beyond Conflict Termination: Impunity for Past Violations as a Recipe for New Ones?. Durban, South Africa: ACCORD (15)Höglund, K. & Jarstad, A. K. (2011). Toward Electoral Security: Experiences from KwaZulu-Natal. Africa Spectrum, 46(1), 33-59Themnér, A. (2011). Violence in Post-Conflict Societies: Remarginalization, Remobilizers and Relationships. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: RoutledgeNilsson, D. (2010). Agreements and Sustainability. In: Nigel J. Young (Ed.), The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace: Volume I (pp. 30-32). New York: Oxford University PressHöglund, K. & Söderberg Kovacs, M. (2010). Beyond the Absence of War: The Diversity of Peace in Post-Settlement Societies. Review of International Studies, 36(2), 367-390Höglund, K. & Jarstad, A. K. (2010). Strategies to Prevent and Manage Electoral Violence: Considerations for Policy. Durban: ACCORDNilsson, D. (2010). Turning Weakness into Strength: Military Capabilities, Multiple Rebel Groups and Negotiated Settlements. Conflict Management and Peace Science, 27(3), 253-271
Partnership Project; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict ResearchThe urban dilemma: Urbanization and ethnocommunal conflict [2018-03924_VR]; Uppsala UniversityThe continuation of conflict-related violence in postwar cities: Mapping violence at the street level [2019-02563_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5673-9056

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